Curriculum by Subject

Art

Art

Art, craft and design embody some of the highest forms of human creativity. At Bishop Challoner Catholic Federation of Schools we deliver a high-quality Art and Design education. We provide a curriculum which engages, inspires and challenges pupils. This equips them with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. As pupils progress, they are able to think critically and develop a more rigorous understanding of the subject. They learn how art and design both reflect and shape our history and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation.

In years 7, 8 and 9 students are taught to develop their creativity and ideas increasing their proficiency in the execution of their work. They develop a critical understanding of artists, architects and designers, expressing reasoned judgements that can inform their own work.

Pupils are taught:

  • to use a range of techniques to record their observations in sketchbooks, journals and other media as a basis for exploring their ideas
  • to use a range of techniques and media, including painting
  • to increase their proficiency in the handling of different materials
  • to analyse and evaluate their own work, and that of others, in order to strengthen the visual impact or applications of their work
  • about the history of art, craft, design and architecture, including periods, styles and major movements from ancient times up to the present day.

 

In Year 7 Students learn about the formal elements of Art and Design; Colour, Tone, Line, Shape and Form, Pattern and Texture. These are the building blocks of all subsequent practice. They explore notions of Personal Identity, creating a colourful profile of themselves from objects and images that relate to themselves and their interests, and also begin looking at portraiture in movements such as Pop Art. In a Landscape Project pupils focus is on using mark-making techniques to create drawings and prints. Pattern and texture are sometimes used to create designs on ceramic tiles.

In Year 8 Students develop notions of identity further in a Self-Portrait project and by learning how the Ancient Egyptians represented their identities through the use of symbols and Hieroglyphics. This time there is focus on drawing and painting more realistic images with better handling of tone and colour. Students look at the way artists have manipulated portraits, such as in David Hockney’s photomontages, and they try these techniques themselves. In an Art & Music project, students look at ways of using art to describe sounds. Students look at the work of artists such as Kandinsky whose exploration in to the spirituality of music led him to become a pioneer of abstract art. Students then create their own abstract work.

Unit Term Topic Theme Lesson Content
Year: 7 
  1 Autumn 1 Formal Elements Baseline Assessment  Pencil assessment drawing - Crushed cup observation
  Line, mark-making (texture), tone, form Line drawing, mark-making techniques and tone
  The Formal Elements Formal Element keywords
  Natural Forms Observational Drawing  Ernst Haeckel Observations 
  The Formal Elements Drawing exercises
  Ernst Haeckel Critical Analysis
  Autumn 2 Monoprinting
  The Colour Wheel  Colour Theory - Primary, Secondary & Tertiary Colours
  Colour Theory - Complementary & Harmonious Colours 
  Colour mixing and applying 
  Colour Theory Yayoi Kusama Critical Analysis 
  Yayoi Kusama Response  
  2 Spring 1 Landscape The Formal Elements Analysing Landscape Art
  Pattern, Shape Analyse and Respond to artist Luke Maitland's work
  The Formal Elements Analyse and respond to at least 3 of the following landscape artists; David Hockney, Paul Klee, Van Gogh, Hundertwasser, Henri Rousseau, Turner
  Spring 2 Printing (applying shape, pattern, line) Polyblock Print - Luke Maitland response 
  Oil Pastel (applying the formal elements) Oil pastel study
  Spring 2  Clay Tile Clay Relief tile design
  Spring 2 Construct clay relief tile design 
  Summer 1 Paint clay relief tile design
  Collage / Photomontage techniques Analyse and respond to one or more of the following photomontage artists; Jiri Kolar, David Hockney, Mimmo Rotella and Jason Chen
  3 Heroes & Villains:  Pop Art Colour Theory and The Formal Elements Analyse and respond to one or more of the following Pop or Op artists; Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Bridget Riley and/or graphic novel depictions of Heroes and Villains
  Summer 2 Heroes & Villains Designs  What is a hero/ villain?  What are their qualities?  Response design idea drawings of heroes and villain characters.
  Response design idea drawings of heroes and villain characters.  Present using a pop art colour palette
  1 Autumn 1 Formal Elements Baseline Assessment  Pencil assessment drawing - Crushed cup observation
  Line, mark-making (texture), tone, form Line drawing, mark-making techniques and tone
  The Formal Elements Formal Element keywords
  Natural Forms Observational Drawing  Ernst Haeckel Observations 
  The Formal Elements Drawing exercises
  Ernst Haeckel Critical Analysis
  Autumn 2 Monoprinting
  The Colour Wheel  Colour Theory - Primary, Secondary & Tertiary Colours
  Colour Theory - Complementary & Harmonious Colours 
  Colour mixing and applying 
  Colour Theory Yayoi Kusama Critical Analysis 
  Yayoi Kusama Response  
  2 Spring 1 Landscape The Formal Elements Analysing Landscape Art
  Pattern, Shape Analyse and Respond to artist Luke Maitland's work
  The Formal Elements Analyse and respond to at least 3 of the following landscape artists; David Hockney, Paul Klee, Van Gogh, Hundertwasser, Henri Rousseau, Turner
  Spring 2 Printing (applying shape, pattern, line) Polyblock Print - Luke Maitland response 
  Oil Pastel (applying the formal elements) Oil pastel study
  Spring 2  Clay Tile Clay Relief tile design
  Spring 2 Construct clay relief tile design 
  Summer 1 Paint clay relief tile design
  Collage / Photomontage techniques Analyse and respond to one or more of the following photomontage artists; Jiri Kolar, David Hockney, Mimmo Rotella and Jason Chen
  3 Heroes & Villains:  Pop Art Colour Theory and The Formal Elements Analyse and respond to one or more of the following Pop or Op artists; Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Bridget Riley and/or graphic novel depictions of Heroes and Villains
  Summer 2 Heroes & Villains Designs  What is a hero/ villain?  What are their qualities?  Response design idea drawings of heroes and villain characters.
  Response design idea drawings of heroes and villain characters.  Present using a pop art colour palette
Year: 8 
  1 Autumn 1 Egyptian Art Observational Drawing  Observational drawings of Facial Features
  Drawing / Collage techniques David Hockney inspired self-portrait collage drawing
  Research Visual Research of Ancient Egyptian Art and artefacts
  Response Designs Create a cartouche design
  Create a sarcophagus design
  Autumn 2 Research and response to the pattern work of Gustav Klimt
  3D Create a 3D outcome in the form of either; Clay Cartouche tile or Papier Mache sarcophagus sculpture
  3D. Painting Painting 3D outcome 
  Evaluation Self-Assessment and Evaluation of Ancient Egyptian Identity Project
  2   Music & Art Composition Onomatopoeia research and response designs
  Mark-making to music
  Research and response to artist Wassily Kandinsky
  2D into 3D drawings (shape into form)
  2D into 3D Compositions
  One point perspective compositions
  1 Autumn 1 Egyptian Art Observational Drawing  Observational drawings of Facial Features
  Drawing / Collage techniques David Hockney inspired self-portrait collage drawing
  Research Visual Research of Ancient Egyptian Art and artefacts
  Response Designs Create a cartouche design
  Create a sarcophagus design
  Autumn 2 Research and response to the pattern work of Gustav Klimt
  3D Create a 3D outcome in the form of either; Clay Cartouche tile or Papier Mache sarcophagus sculpture
  3D. Painting Painting 3D outcome 
  Evaluation Self-Assessment and Evaluation of Ancient Egyptian Identity Project
  3   Typography - Illustrative Lettering Graphic Design 'Words to Describe Themselves' research and response designs
  Research and response to Ed Ruscha, Robert Indiana or another example of illustrative lettering within graphic design

 

Year 9

Term 1

Surrealism of Objects/Self-Image.

Coursework unit =60% of final GCSE grade.

 

Students explore a range of artists and artworks around the theme of Surrealism and create personal responses, making connections to the artist’s work they analyse.

The following artist’s work is explored –Marcelo Monreal, Ian MacArthur and Rene Magritte The following assessment objectives are covered within the

coursework unit.

 

Develop

Develop ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources.

 

Research and analyse the work of Surrealist artists, such as Marcelo Monreal and Redmer Hoekstra and Rene Magritte; focusing on the content, mood, colour and composition of the artworks, as well as making links to their own practical work.

 

 

Refine

Refine ideas through experimenting and selecting appropriate resources, media,

Materials and processes.

Create personal responses to artist’s work using collage materials, observational drawing, printmaking and Photoshop techniques.

 

 

Record

Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.

Work from a range of photographs and record from images using a wide range of media and processes.

 

 

Year 9

Term 2

Surrealism of Objects/Self-Image.

Coursework unit =60% of final GCSE grade.

 

Students explore a range of artists and artworks around the theme of Surrealism and create personal responses, making connections to the artist’s work they analyse.

The following artist’s work is explored –Frida Kahlo, Rene Magritte and Dorothea Tanning.

The following assessment objectives are covered within the

coursework unit.

 

Develop

Develop ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources.

 

Research and analyse the work of Surrealist artists such as Frida Kahlo, Rene Magritte and Dorothea Tanning; focusing on the content, mood, colour and composition of the artworks, as well as making links to their own practical work.

 

 

Refine

Refine ideas through experimenting and selecting appropriate resources, media,

Materials and processes.

Create personal responses to artist’s work using collage materials, observational drawing, printmaking and Photoshop techniques.

 

 

Record

Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.

Work from a range of photographs and record from images using a wide range of media and processes.

 

 

Year 9

Term 3

Surrealism of Objects/Self-Image.

Coursework unit =60% of final GCSE grade.

Students explore a range of artists and artworks around the theme of Surrealism and create personal responses, making connections to the artist’s work they analyse.

The following artist’s work is explored –M.C Esher, Marcelo Monreal, Redmer Hoekstra, Ian MacArthur.

 The following assessment objectives are covered within the

coursework unit.

 

Develop

Develop ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources.

 

Research and analyse the work of Surrealist artists such as Frida Kahlo, Rene Magritte and Dorothea Tanning; focusing on the content, mood, colour and composition of the artworks, as well as making links to their own practical work.

 

 

 

Refine

Refine ideas through experimenting and selecting appropriate resources, media,

Materials and processes.

Create personal responses to artist’s work using collage materials, observational drawing, printmaking and Photoshop techniques.

 

 

Record

Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.

Work from a range of photographs and record from images using a wide range of media and processes.

 

Present

Year 9 – Three-hour mock exam

Students create a final piece under exam conditions, making connections to developmental work within their sketchbooks.

 

 

 

Year 10

Term 1

Overall theme; Identity

Autumn term 1

Objects & Belongings/Self-Image

 

Coursework unit =60% of final GCSE grade.

Students explore a range of artists and artworks around the theme of Objects & Belongings and create personal responses, making connections to the artist’s work they analyse.

The following artist’s work is explored -Michael Craig-Martin, Wayne Thiebaud, Patrick Caulfield, Rembrandt, Dryden Goodwin.

The following assessment objectives are covered within the

coursework unit.

 

Develop

Develop ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources.

 

Research and analyse the work of pop artists Michael Craig- Martin, Patrick Caulfield and Wayne Thiebaud,; focusing on the content, mood, colour and composition of the artworks, as well as making links to their own practical work.

 

 

Refine

Refine ideas through experimenting and selecting appropriate resources, media,

Materials and processes.

Create personal responses to artist’s work using collage materials, observational drawing printmaking and Photoshop techniques.

 

Record

Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.

Work from a range of photographs and record from images using a wide range of media and processes.

 

 

Year 10

Term 2

Objects & Belongings/Self-Image.

Coursework unit=60% of final GCSE grade.

Students explore a range of artist work around the theme of Self – image and create personal responses, making connections to the artist work they analyse.

The following artist’s work is explored -Michael Craig-Martin, Wayne Thiebaud, Patrick Caulfield, Julian Opie, Rembrandt, Dryden Goodwin, David Hockney.

The following assessment objectives are covered within the

coursework unit:

 

Develop

Develop ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources.

 

Research and analyse the work of artists such as Rembrandt and Dryden Goodwin; focusing on the content, mood, colour and composition of the artworks, as well as the range of mark-making techniques within their portraiture work.

 

 

 

Refine

Refine ideas through experimenting and selecting appropriate resources, media,

Materials and processes.

Create personal responses to artist’s work using collage materials, observational drawing printmaking and mark-making techniques.

 

 

Record

Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.

Work from a range of photographs and record from images using a wide range of media and processes.

Year 10

Term 3

Objects & Belongings/Self-Image.

Coursework unit=60% of final GCSE grade.

Students explore a range of artist work around the theme of Self – image and create personal responses, making connections to the artist work they analyse.

The following artist’s work is explored Rembrandt, Dryden Goodwin, David Hockney, John Stezaker and Jiri Kolar.

The following assessment objectives are covered within the

coursework unit:

 

Develop

Develop ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources.

Research and analyse the work of artists such as John Stezaker and Jiri Kolar; focusing on the content, mood, colour and composition of the artworks, as well as the way they manipulate imagery within their work.

 

 

Refine

Refine ideas through experimenting and selecting appropriate resources, media,

Materials and processes.

Create personal responses to artist’s work using collage materials, observational drawing printmaking and mark-making techniques.

 

 

Record

Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.

Create personal responses to artist’s work using collage materials, observational drawing printmaking and mark-making techniques.

 

 

Present

Year 10 – Five-hour mock exam

Students create a final piece under exam conditions, making connections to developmental work within their sketchbooks.

 

 

 

Year 11

Term 1

Objects & Belongings/Self-Image.

Coursework unit=60% of final GCSE grade.

Students begin to select their own artists and explore a range of work around the theme of Self – image and create personal responses, making connections to the artist work they analyse.

Students can continue to develop ideas from an artist they have already researched or introduce other artist work that inspire their own personal work.

The following assessment objectives are covered within the

coursework unit:

 

Develop

Develop ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources.

Research and analyse the work of artists that inspire and make links to students own practical work; focusing on the content, mood, colour and composition of the artworks.

 

Annotate sketchbook work describing the thought process and inspiration behind their own practical work.

 

 

 

 

Refine

Refine ideas through experimenting and selecting appropriate resources, media,

Materials and processes.

Create personal responses to artist’s work using collage materials, observational drawing printmaking and mark-making techniques.

 

 

Record

Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.

Create personal responses to artist’s work using collage materials, observational drawing printmaking and mark-making techniques.

 

 

Present

Year 11 – Ten-hour mock exam

Students create a final piece under exam conditions, making connections to developmental work within their sketchbooks.

Year 11

Term 2

Externally set assignment (theme set by the exam board)

Exam Unit=40% of final GCSE grade.

Students explore a range of artists work around the theme set by the exam board.

Students then create personal responses, making connections to the artist work they analyse.

The following assessment objectives are covered within the

Exam unit:

 

 

Develop

Develop ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources.

Research and analyse the work of artists that inspire and make links to students own practical work; focusing on the content, mood, colour and composition of the artworks.

 

Annotate sketchbook work describing the thought process and inspiration behind their own practical work.

 

Refine

Refine ideas through experimenting and selecting appropriate resources, media,

Materials and processes.

Create personal responses to artist’s work using collage materials, observational drawing printmaking and mark-making techniques.

 

Record

Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.

Create personal responses to artist’s work using collage materials, observational drawing printmaking and mark-making techniques.

 

 

 

 

 

Year 11

Term 3

Externally set assignment (theme set by the exam board).

Exam Unit=40% of final GCSE grade.

Students explore a range of artists work around the theme set by the exam board.

Students then create personal responses, making connections to the artist work they analyse.

The following assessment objectives are covered within the

Exam unit:

 

Develop

Develop ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources.

Research and analyse the work of artists that inspire and make links to students own practical work; focusing on the content, mood, colour and composition of the artworks.

 

Annotate sketchbook work describing the thought process and inspiration behind their own practical work.

 

 

Refine

Refine ideas through experimenting and selecting appropriate resources, media,

Materials and processes.

Create personal responses to artist’s work using collage materials, observational drawing printmaking and mark-making techniques.

 

 

Record

Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.

Create personal responses to artist’s work using collage materials, observational drawing printmaking and mark-making techniques.

 

 

Present

Year 11 – Final ten-hour exam.

Students create a final piece under exam conditions, making connections to developmental work within their sketchbooks.

 

Biology

Year 9

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

B1: Cell level systems

B1.1

Describe how light microscopes and staining can be used to view cells

Name the main sub-cellular structures of eukaryotic cells and prokaryotic cells and explain how they are related to their functions

Explain how electron microscopy has increased our understanding of sub-cellular structures

B1: Cell level systems

B1.2

Describe DNA as a polymer that is made up of two strands, forming a double helix

Describe that DNA is made from four different nucleotides

HT ONLY: Recall a simple description of protein synthesis

HT ONLY: Explain simply how the structure of DNA affects the proteins made in protein synthesis, to include the triplet code

Describe experiments that can be used to investigate enzymatic reactions

Explain the mechanism of enzyme action

B1: Cell level systems

B1.3

Describe cellular respiration as a universal chemical process that occurs continuously to supply ATP in all living cells

Describe cellular respiration as an exothermic reaction

Describe and compare the processes of aerobic and anaerobic respiration in animals and plants/fungi inc ATP yield and location

Explain the importance of sugars in the synthesis and breakdown of carbohydrates

Explain the importance of amino acids in the synthesis and breakdown of proteins

Explain the importance of fatty acids and glycerol in the synthesis and breakdown of lipids

B1: Cell level systems

B1..4

Recall that photosynthetic organisms are the main source of food and therefore biomass for life on Earth

Describe the process of photosynthesis, to include reactants and products, the word equation and location of the reaction

Describe photosynthesis as an endothermic reaction

Describe experiments to investigate photosynthesis

Explain the effect of temperature, light intensity and carbon dioxide concentration on the rate of photosynthesis

HT ONLY: Explain the interaction of the effect of temperature, light intensity and carbon dioxide concentration in limiting the rate of photosynthesis

B2: Scaling up:

 B2.1 Supplying the cell

Explain how substances are transported into and out of cells through diffusion, osmosis and active transport

Describe the process of mitosis in growth, including the cell cycle

Explain the importance of cell differentiation

Recall that stem cells are present in embryonic and adult animals and meristems in plants

Describe the functions of stem cells

Describe the difference between embryonic and adult stem cells in animals

Term 2

B2: Scaling up:

B2.2 The challenges of sizes

Explain the need for exchange surfaces and a transport system in multicellular organisms in terms of surface area: volume ratio

Describe some of the substances transported into and out of a range of organisms in terms of the requirements of those organisms

Describe the human circulatory system, the relationship with the gaseous exchange system and the arrangement of vessels

Explain how the structure of the heart and the blood vessels are adapted to their functions

Explain how red blood cells and plasma are adapted to their transport functions in the blood

Explain how water and mineral ions are taken up by plants, including relating the structure of root hair cells to their function

Describe the process of transpiration and translocation

Explain how the structures of the xylem and phloem are adapted to their functions in the plant

Explain the effect of a variety of environmental factors on the rate of water uptake by a plant

Describe how a simple potometer can be used to investigate factors that affect the rate of water uptake

B4: Community level systems

Recall that many different substances cycle through the abiotic and biotic components of an ecosystem, with examples

Explain the role of microorganisms in the cycling of substances through an ecosystem

Explain the importance of the carbon cycle and the water cycle to living organisms

BIO ONLY: Explain the effect of factors such as temperature, water content, and oxygen availability on rate of decomposition

Describe different levels of organisation in an ecosystem from individual organisms to the whole ecosystem

Explain how abiotic and biotic factors can affect communities

Describe the importance of interdependence and competition in a community

BIO ONLY: Describe the differences between the trophic levels of organisms within an ecosystem

BIO ONLY: Describe pyramids of biomass and explain, with examples, how biomass is lost between the different trophic levels

BIO ONLY: Calculate the efficiency of biomass transfers between trophic levels and explain how this affects the number of trophic levels in a food chain

Term 3

B6: Global challenges:

 B6.1: Monitoring and maintaining the environment

Explain how to carry out a field investigation into the distribution and abundance of organisms in a habitat and how to determine their numbers in a given area

Describe positive and negative human interactions within ecosystems

Explain the impact of human interactions within ecosystems on biodiversity

Explain some of the benefits and challenges of maintaining local and global biodiversity

HT ONLY:  Evaluate the evidence for the impact of environmental changes on the distribution of organisms, with reference to water and atmospheric gases

 

 

Year 10

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

B6: Global challenges:

B6.3: Monitoring and maintaining health

Describe the relationship between health and disease

Describe different types of diseases, to include communicable and non-communicable diseases

Describe the interactions between different types of disease

Explain how communicable diseases are spread in animals and plants

Explain how the spread of communicable diseases may be reduced or prevented in animals and plants

Describe a minimum of one common human infection, one plant disease and sexually transmitted infections in humans

BIO ONLY: Describe physical and chemical plant defences

BIO & HT ONLY: Describe different ways plant diseases can be detected and identified, in the lab and in the field

Explain how white blood cells and platelets are adapted to their defence functions in the blood

Describe the non-specific defence systems of the human body against pathogens

Explain the role of the immune system of the human body in defence against disease

BIO & HT ONLY: Describe what monoclonal antibodies are and how they are produced

BIO & HT ONLY: Describe some of the ways in which monoclonal antibodies can be used

Explain the use of vaccines and medicines in the prevention and treatment of disease

BIO ONLY: Explain the aseptic techniques used in culturing organisms

Describe the processes of discovery and development of potential new medicines

Recall that many non-communicable human diseases are caused by the interaction of a number of factors

Evaluate some different treatments for cardiovascular disease

Analyse the effect of lifestyle factors on the incidence of non-communicable diseases at local, national and global levels

Describe cancer as the result of changes in cells that lead to uncontrolled growth and division

Discuss potential benefits and risks associated with the use of stem cells in medicine

Explain some of the possible benefits and risks of using gene technology in medicine

Discuss the potential importance for medicine of our increasing understanding of the human genome

B3: Organism level systems:

B3.1: Coordination and Control – the nervous system

Describe the structure of the nervous system, to include the central nervous system, sensory and motor neurones and sensory receptors

Explain how the components of the nervous system can produce a coordinated response

Explain how the structure of a reflex arc is related to its function

Explain how the main structures of the eye are related to their functions

Describe common defects of the eye and explain how some of these problems may be overcome

Describe the structure and function of the brain, to include the cerebrum, cerebellum, medulla, hypothalamus and pituitary

HT ONLY: Explain some of the difficulties of investigating brain function

HT ONLY: Explain some of the limitations in treating damage and disease in the brain and other parts of the nervous system

Term 2

B3: Organism level systems:

B3.2: Coordination and Control the endocrine system

Describe the principles of hormonal coordination and control by the human endocrine system

HT ONLY: Explain the roles of thyroxine and adrenalin in the body, including thyroxine as an example of a negative feedback system

Name and describe the roles of hormones involved in human reproduction, including control of the menstrual cycle

HT ONLY: Explain the interactions of FSH, LH, oestrogen and progesterone in the control of the menstrual cycle

Explain the use of hormones in contraception

Evaluate hormonal and non-hormonal methods of contraception

HT ONLY: Explain the use of hormones in modern reproductive technologies to treat infertility

Explain how plant hormones are important in the control and coordination of plant growth and development

Describe some of the variety of effects of plant hormones, relating to auxins

Describe some of the variety of effects of plant hormones, relating to gibberellins and ethene

Describe some of the different ways in which people use plant hormones to control plant growth

B3: Organism level systems:

B3.3: Maintaining Internal Environment 

Explain the importance of maintaining a constant internal environment in response to internal and external change

BIO ONLY: Describe the function of the skin in the control of body temperature

Explain how insulin controls blood sugar levels in the body

HT ONLY: Explain how glucagon interacts with insulin to control blood sugar levels in the body

Compare type 1 and type 2 diabetes and explain how they can be treated

Explain the effect on cells of osmotic changes in body fluids

Describe the function of the kidneys in maintaining the water balance of the body

Describe the gross structure of the kidney and the structure of the kidney tubule

Describe the effect of ADH on the permeability of the kidney tubules

BIO & HT ONLY: Explain the response of the body to different temperature and osmotic challenges

Term 3

B5: Genes, inheritance and selection:

B5.1 Genes, Inheritance and Selection 

Explain the following terms: gamete, chromosome, gene, genome, allele/variant, dominant, recessive, homozygous, heterozygous, genotype and phenotype

Describe the genome as the entire genetic material of an organism

Describe that the genome, and its interaction with the environment, influence the development of the phenotype of an organism

Recall that all variants arise from mutations, and that most have no effect on the phenotype, some influence phenotype and a very few determine phenotype

Describe how genetic variants may influence phenotype, to include how in coding DNA the activity of a protein can be altered and how in non-coding DNA gene expression can be altered

BIO ONLY: Explain some of the advantages and disadvantages of asexual and sexual reproduction in a range of organisms

Explain the terms haploid and diploid

Explain the role of meiotic cell division in halving the chromosome number to form gametes

Explain single gene inheritance

Predict the results of single gene crosses

Describe sex determination in humans using a genetic cross

Recall that most phenotypic features are the result of multiple genes rather than single gene inheritance

BIO ONLY: Describe the development of our understanding of genetics, to include knowledge of Mendel

 

B6: Global challenges:

 B6.2: Feeding the human race

BIO ONLY: Explain the term 'food security' and some of the biological factors that affect it

BIO ONLY: Describe and explain some possible agricultural solutions to the demands of the growing human population

Explain the impact of the selective breeding of food plants and domesticated animals

Describe genetic engineering as a process which involves modifying the genome of an organism to introduce desirable characteristics

HT ONLY: Describe the main steps in the process of genetic engineering

BIO ONLY: Explain some of the possible benefits and risks of using gene technology in modern agriculture

Describe and explain some possible biotechnological and agricultural solutions to the demands of the growing human population

 

 

Year 11

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

B5: Genes, inheritance and selection:

 B5.2 Natural Selection and Evolution 

State that there is usually extensive genetic variation within a population of a species

Describe the impact of developments in biology on classification systems

Explain how evolution occurs through the natural selection of variants that have given rise to different phenotypes

Describe evolution as a change in the inherited characteristics of a population over me, through a process of natural selection

Describe the evidence for evolution, to include fossils and antibiotic resistance in bacteria

BIO ONLY: Describe the work of Darwin and Wallace in the development of the theory of evolution by natural selection

BIO ONLY: Explain the impact of the theory of evolution on modern biology and society

Term 2

B6: Global challenges:

 B6.4: Monitoring and maintaining health

 

Exam revision

 

 

Business

Business

The study of Business and Economics are two exceeding important areas that affect everyone, every day of their lives. You will learn about how the businesses make decisions that affect what you buy and how much you earn. You will study topics that allow you to develop your leadership and management skills and work towards setting up your own businesses. You will also study how economic theory can affect people, businesses and world economies.

Studying Business and Economics courses will allow you to access courses at university and ultimately can allow you to work in many business related careers such as: Accountancy, Business Management, Business Analyst, Economist, 

What you will study at GCSE

Year 9 –

WJEC Retail Business

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

 

Unit 3 Retail Operations (Internal)

LO1 - Know how retail operations are organised

 

 

 

 

LO2 – Understand interaction between customers and retail activities

 

 

  • Describe activities of retail functional areas
  • Describe rights of retail employees
  • Summarise responsibilities of retail employees
  • Describe effects of legislation on retail operations

 

  • Assess methods used by retail businesses to encourage sales
  • Explain how technology is used to interact with customers

Term 2

LO3 - Understand how retail businesses prepare for changes in the retail environment

 

LO4 - Be able to propose changes to retail operations

 

  • Explain the effects of seasonality on retail operations
  • Explain measures retail businesses use to prepare for unplanned situations in daily retail operations

 

  • Identify relevant issues for a retail business to resolve
  • Suggest realistic and detailed actions for changes to a retail business’s operations.
  • Justify suggestions relevant to issues faced by a retail business using relevant examples in support of conclusions

 

Term 3

Controlled Assessment for Unit 3

 

Unit 1 Customer Experience (Internal)

LO1 – Know customer service standards of retail businesses

  • Carry out and complete controlled assessment for Unit 3

 

 

  • Describe principles of customer service in a retail business
  • Describe a wide range of situations when customers interact with retail businesses
  • Outline how customer service delivery differs across retail channels

 

 

Year 10 –

WJEC Retail Business

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

 

 

Unit 1 Customer Experience (Internal cont’d)

LO2 – Understand how retail businesses meet the expectations of customers

 

LO3 - Be able to investigate the quality of customer experience in retail businesses

 

 

 

  • Describe needs of different types of retail customers
  • Explain how retail businesses meet the expectations of different types of customers

 

  • Design research tools for retail businesses
  • Record information from secondary sources and analyse information
  • Present information with appropriate use of content, images and language
  • Draw conclusions with references to research findings

 

Term 2

Controlled Assessment for Unit 1

 

Unit 2 Retail Business (External)

LO1 – Understand retail business

 

LO2 – Understand the business environment in which retail businesses operate

 

  • Carry out and complete controlled assessment for Unit 1

 

 

 

  • Describe forms of retail businesses
  • Assess forms of ownership for retail businesses
  • Suggest objectives of retail businesses

 

  • Explain how the UK business environment affect retail businesses
  • Explain the effect of location characteristics on retail businesses in different locations
  • Suggest methods used by retail businesses to achieve objectives

 

Term 3

LO3 – Be able to recommend solutions to retail business issues

 

Revision and practice assessment:

  • past papers
  • targeted intervention (topic specific)
  • exam techniques
    • describe questions
    • explain questions
    • analyse questions
    • justify questions
    • evaluate questions
    • PEEL
    • BLT

 

External Assessment for Unit 2 – June Series (First attempt)

  • Analyse situations
  • Interpret and evaluate data
  • Review options for solutions to issues

 

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of business concepts and
    issues
  • Apply knowledge and understanding of business concepts and issues
    to a variety of contexts
  • Analyse and evaluate business information and issues to demonstrate
    understanding of business activity, make judgements and draw
    conclusions

 

 

 

Year 11 –

WJEC Retail Business

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

 

 

Unit 2 Retail Business (External)

LO1 – Understand retail business

 

LO2 – Understand the business environment in which retail businesses operate

 

 

  • Describe forms of retail businesses
  • Assess forms of ownership for retail businesses
  • Suggest objectives of retail businesses

 

  • Explain how the UK business environment affect retail businesses
  • Explain the effect of location characteristics on retail businesses in different locations
  • Suggest methods used by retail businesses to achieve objectives

 

Term 2

LO3 – Be able to recommend solutions to retail business issues

 

Revision and practice assessment:

  • past papers
  • targeted intervention (topic specific)
  • exam techniques
    • describe questions
    • explain questions
    • analyse questions
    • justify questions
    • evaluate questions
    • PEEL
    • BLT

 

 

  • Analyse situations
  • Interpret and evaluate data
  • Review options for solutions to issues

 

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of business concepts and
    issues
  • Apply knowledge and understanding of business concepts and issues
    to a variety of contexts
  • Analyse and evaluate business information and issues to demonstrate
    understanding of business activity, make judgements and draw
    conclusions

Term 3

Revision and practice assessment:

  • past papers
  • targeted intervention (topic specific)
  • exam techniques
    • describe questions
    • explain questions
    • analyse questions
    • justify questions
    • evaluate questions
    • PEEL
    • BLT

 

External Moderation – Unit 1 and 3

 

 

External Assessment for Unit 2 – June Series (Second attempt)

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of business concepts and
    issues
  • Apply knowledge and understanding of business concepts and issues
    to a variety of contexts
  • Analyse and evaluate business information and issues to demonstrate
    understanding of business activity, make judgements and draw
    conclusions

 

Chemistry

Year 9

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

C1: Particles

Describe the main features of the particle model in terms of states of matter and change of state

Explain, in terms of the particle model, the distinction between physical changes and chemical changes

HT ONLY: Discuss the limitations of the particle model in relation to changes of state when particles are represented by inelastic spheres

Describe how and why the atomic model has changed over time

Describe the structure of and name the sub atomic particles

State the approximate size of atoms and the relative size of the nucleus and recall where most of the atom's mass is located

State the relative charge of protons, neutrons and electrons and describe the overall charge of an atom

State the relative masses of protons, neutrons and electrons and describe the distribution of mass in an atom

Calculate the number of protons, neutrons and electrons in an atom when given its atomic number and mass number

Define atomic number and mass number

Define an ion and an isotope and use the standard notation to represent these

 

C2: Elements, compounds and mixtures

C2.1 separating mixtures

Explain what is meant by the purity of a substance, distinguishing between the scientific and everyday use of the term ‘pure’

Recall how to use melting point data to distinguish pure from impure substances

Describe what the relative formula mass (Mr) of a compound is and calculate the relative formula mass of a compound, given its formula

Deduce the empirical formula of a compound

Explain that many useful materials are formulations of mixtures

Describe, explain and exemplify the processes of filtration, crystallisation, simple distillation, and fractional distillation

Describe the techniques of paper and thin layer chromatography

Recall that chromatography involves a stationary and a mobile phase

Recall how to interpret chromatograms, including measuring Rf values

Suggest suitable separation and purification techniques for different mixtures

Suggest chromatographic methods for distinguishing pure from impure substances

Term 2

C2: Elements, compounds and mixtures

C2.2 bonding

Describe metals and non-metals and explain the differences between them on the basis of their characteristic physical and chemical properties

Explain how the atomic structure of metals and non-metals relates to their position in the periodic table

Explain how the position of an element in the periodic table is related to the arrangement of electrons in its atoms

Describe how elements are placed in groups and periods and how the electrons link to group number

Describe and compare the nature and arrangement of chemical bonds in: ionic compounds, simple molecules, giant covalent structures, polymers and metals

Explain chemical bonding in terms of electrostatic forces and the transfer or sharing of electrons

Represent ionic compounds and simple covalent molecules using dot and cross diagrams

Discuss the limitations of particular representations and models, including dot and cross diagrams, ball and stick models and two- and three-dimensional representations

Explain how the reactions of elements are related to the arrangement of electrons in their atoms and hence to their atomic number

Explain in terms of atomic number how Mendeleev’s arrangement was refined into the modern periodic table

 

C2: Elements, compounds and mixtures

C2.3  carbon allotropes

Recall that carbon can form four covalent bonds

Explain that the vast array of natural and synthetic organic compounds occurs due to the ability of carbon to form families of similar compounds, chains and rings

Explain the properties of graphite, diamond, fullerenes and graphene in terms of their structure and bonding

Explain the different temperatures at which changes of state occur, using ideas about energy transfers and the relative strength of chemical bonds and intermolecular forces

Use data to predict states of substances under given conditions

Explain how the bulk properties of materials are related to the different types of bonds they contain, their bond strengths and the ways in which their bonds are arranged

CHEM ONLY: Compare the dimensions of nanoparticles to other particles and explain the effect of their high surface area to volume ratio on their properties

CHEM ONLY: Describe the surface area to volume relationship for different-sized particles and describe how this affects properties

CHEM ONLY: Describe how the properties of Nano particulate materials are related to their uses

CHEM ONLY: Explain the possible risks associated with some Nano particulate materials

 

C4: Predicting and identifying reactions and products

C4.1 predicating chemical reactions

Recall the physical and chemical properties of Groups 1, 7 and 0

Explain how observed simple properties of Groups 1, 7 and 0 depend on the outer shell of electrons of the atoms and predict properties from given trends down the groups

Recall the general properties of transition metals and their compounds and exemplify these by reference to a small number of transition metals

Recall how to predict possible reactions and probable reactivity of elements from their positions in the periodic table

Explain how the reactivity of metals with water or dilute acids is related to the tendency of the metal to form its positive ion

Deduce the order of reactivity of metals based on experimental data

Term 3

C4: Predicting and identifying reactions and products

C4.2 identifying products

Describe how to test for the presence of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide and chlorine

Describe tests to identify aqueous cations and aqueous anions

Describe how to perform a flame test

 Recall how to identify species from test results

Interpret flame tests to identify metal ions

Describe the advantages of instrumental methods of analysis

Recall how to interpret an instrumental result when given appropriate data in chart or tabular form

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year 10

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

C3: Chemical reactions

C3.1 introducing chemical reactions

Recall how to use chemical symbols to write the formulae of elements and simple covalent and ionic compounds

Write word equations and balanced symbol equations for chemical reactions, including using appropriate state symbols

Use the names and symbols of common elements and compounds and the principle of conservation of mass to write formulae and balanced chemical equations

Use the names and symbols of common elements from a supplied periodic table to write formulae and balanced chemical equations where appropriate

Use the formula of common ions to deduce the formula of a compound

HT ONLY: Write balanced half equations and ionic equations

HT ONLY: Recall and use the definitions of the Avogadro constant and of the mole, and carry out calculations in standard form using the Avogadro constant

HT ONLY: Explain how the mass of a given substance is related to the amount of that substance in moles and vice versa

Recall and use the law of conservation of mass

Explain any observed changes in mass in non-enclosed systems during a chemical reaction, using the particle model

HT ONLY: Deduce the stoichiometry of an equation from the masses of reactants and products

HT ONLY: Explain the effect of limiting the quantity of a reactant

HT ONLY: Calculate the masses of reactants and products when given a balanced symbol equation

 

C3: Chemical reactions

C3.2 Energetics

Distinguish between endothermic and exothermic reactions on the basis of the temperature change of the surroundings

Draw and label a reaction profile for an exothermic and an endothermic reaction

Explain activation energy as the energy needed for a reaction to occur

HT ONLY: Calculate energy changes in a chemical reaction by considering bond making and bond breaking energies

Term 2

C3: Chemical reactions

C3.3 types of chemical reactions

Explain reduction and oxidation in terms of loss or gain of oxygen, identifying which species are oxidised and which are reduced

HT ONLY: Explain reduction and oxidation in terms of gain or loss of electrons

Recall that acids form hydrogen ions when they dissolve in water and solutions of alkalis contain hydroxide ions

Describe neutralisation as acid reacting with alkali or a base to form a salt plus water

Recall that aqueous neutralisation reactions can be generalised to hydrogen ions reacting with hydroxide ions to form water

Recall that carbonates and some metals react with acids and write balanced equations predicting products from given reactants

HT ONLY: Use and explain the terms dilute and concentrated and weak and strong, in relation to acids

Recall that relative acidity and alkalinity are measured by pH

HT ONLY: Describe neutrality and relative acidity and alkalinity in terms of the effect of the concentration of hydrogen ions on the numerical value of pH

HT ONLY: Recall that as hydrogen ion concentration increases by a factor of ten the pH value of a solution decreases by a factor of one

Describe techniques and apparatus used to measure pH

 

C3: Chemical reactions

C3.4 Electrolysis

Recall at which inert electrode (cathode or anode) that metals, hydrogen and non-metals are formed at

Predict the products of electrolysis of binary ionic compounds (e.g. NaCl) in the molten state

Describe competing reactions in the electrolysis of aqueous solutions of ionic compounds e.g. NaCl and CuSO4

Describe electrolysis in terms of the ions present and reactions at the electrodes

Describe the technique of electrolysis using inert and non-inert electrodes

Term 3

C6: Global challenges

Interpret evidence for how it is thought the atmosphere was originally formed

Explain how, at the beginning of Earth's existence, oxygen was produced by photosynthesis and use the word and chemical equation for photosynthesis

Describe the greenhouse effect in terms of the interaction of radiation with matter within the atmosphere

Evaluate arguments for and against the idea that human activities cause a rise in temperature that results in global climate change

State some potential side effects of global climate change, including discussing scale, risk and environmental implications

List the major sources of carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen and particulates in the atmosphere and explain the problems caused by increased amounts of these substances

Describe the principal methods for increasing the availability of potable water in terms of the separation techniques used

 

C6.3 interpreting  and interacting with the earth

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year 11

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

C6: Global challenges

 

C6.2 Organic chemistry

Recognise functional groups and identify members of the same homologous series

Name and draw the structural formulae, using fully displayed formulae, of the first four members of the straight chain alkanes, alkenes, alcohols and carboxylic acids

 Predict the formulae and structures of products of reactions of the first four and other given members of the homologous series of alkanes, alkenes and alcohols

CHEM ONLY: Recall the basic principles of addition polymerisation by reference to the functional group in the monomer and the repeating units in the polymer

Explain the basic principles of condensation polymerisation

Describe practical techniques to make a polymer by condensation

Deduce the structure of an addition polymer from a simple alkene monomer and vice versa

Recall that DNA is a polymer made from four different monomers called nucleotides and that other important naturally-occurring polymers are based on sugars and amino-acids

Recall that it is the generality of reactions of functional groups that determine the reactions of organic compounds

Describe and explain the separation of crude oil by fractional distillation

Describe the fractions as largely a mixture of compounds of formula CnH2n+2 which are members of the alkane homologous series

Recall that crude oil is a main source of hydrocarbons and is a feedstock for the petrochemical industry

Explain how modern life is crucially dependent upon hydrocarbons and recognise that crude oil is a finite resource

Describe the production of materials that are more useful by cracking

Recall that a chemical cell produces a potential difference until the reactants are used up

Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of hydrogen/oxygen and other fuel cells for given uses

 

C6: Global challenges

C6.1improving processes and products

Explain, using the position of carbon in the reactivity series, the principles of industrial processes used to extract metals

Explain why and how electrolysis is used to extract some metals from their ores

HT ONLY: Evaluate alternative biological methods of metal extraction

Describe the process of condensation polymerisation

Explain the trade-off between rate of production of a desired product and position of equilibrium, in some industrial processes

Recall how to interpret graphs of reaction conditions versus rate

CHEM & HT ONLY: Explain how the commercially used conditions for an industrial process are related to the availability and cost of raw materials and energy supplies, control of equilibrium position and rate

Explain the importance of the Haber process in agricultural production

Compare the industrial production of fertilisers with laboratory syntheses of the same products

Recall the importance of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium compounds in agricultural production

Describe the industrial production of fertilisers as several integrated processes using a variety of raw materials

Describe the basic principles in carrying out a life-cycle assessment of a material or product

Recall how to interpret data from a life-cycle assessment of a material or product

Describe a process where a material or product is recycled for a different use, and explain why this is viable

Evaluate factors that affect decisions on recycling

Describe the composition of some important alloys in relation to their properties and uses

Describe the process of corrosion and the conditions which cause corrosion

Explain how mitigation of corrosion is achieved by creating a physical barrier to oxygen and water and by sacrificial protection

Compare quantitatively the physical properties of glass and clay ceramics, polymers, composites and metals

Explain how the properties of materials are related to their uses and select appropriate materials given details of the usage required

 

C5: Monitoring and controlling chemical reactions

C5.2 controlling rates

Suggest practical methods for determining the rate of reaction

Recall how to interpret rate of reaction graphs

Describe the effect of changes in temperature, concentration, pressure, and surface area on rate of reaction

Explain the effects on rates of reaction of changes in temperature, concentration and pressure in terms of frequency and energy of collision between particles

Explain the effects on rates of reaction of changes in the size of the pieces of a reacting solid in terms of surface area to volume ratio

Describe the characteristics of catalysts and their effect on rates of reaction

Recall how to identify catalysts in reactions

Explain catalytic action in terms of activation energy

Recall that enzymes act as catalysts in biological systems

 

C5: Monitoring and controlling chemical reactions

C5.3 equilibria 

Recall that some reactions may be reversed by altering the reaction conditions

Recall that dynamic equilibrium occurs in a closed system when the rates of forward and reverse reactions are equal

HT ONLY:  Recall how to predict the effect of changing reaction conditions on equilibrium position and suggest appropriate conditions to produce as much of a particular product as possible

Term 2

C5: Monitoring and controlling chemical reactions

HT ONLY: Explain how the concentration of a solution in mol/dm^3 is related to the mass of the solute and the volume of the solution

Describe the technique of titration

: Explain the relationship between the volume of a solution of known concentration of a substance and the volume or concentration of another substance that react completely together

Describe the relationship between molar amounts of gases and their volumes and vice versa

Calculate the volume of a gas at room temperature and pressure from its mass and relative formula mass

Calculate the volumes of gases involved in reactions using the molar gas volume at room temperature and pressure

HT ONLY: Explain how the mass of a solute and the volume of the solution is related to the concentration of the solution

Calculate the theoretical amount of a product from a given amount of reactant

Calculate the percentage yield of a reaction product from the actual yield of a reaction

Define the atom economy of a reaction

Calculate the atom economy of a reaction to form a desired product from the balanced equation

HT ONLY: Explain why a particular reaction pathway is chosen to produce a specified product given appropriate data

 

Exam revision

 

 

Computer Science

Computer Science

Computer Science gives students a real, in depth understanding of how computer technology works. It offers an insight into what goes on ‘behind the scenes’, including computer programming, which many students find captivating. Throughout the key stages students develop critical thinking, analysis and problem-solving skills, which can be transferred to further learning and to everyday life. Students who want to go on to higher study and employment in the field of computer science will find it provides an excellent stepping stone.

 

In Year 7

Term 1: Students learn about the legal safeguards regarding computer use, including overviews of the Computer Misuse Act, Data Protection Act, GDPR and Copyright Law and their implications for computer use. Phishing scams and other email frauds, hacking, “data harvesting” identity theft and safe use of social media are discussed together with ways of protecting online identity and privacy. Health and Safety Law and environmental issues such as the safe disposal of old computers are also discussed.

Term 2: Student consolidate their learning of angles, distance and shapes to program instructions for a turtle using the Python IDE. They are able to see the outcomes of their solutions and test them, refine it and evaluate how effectively their output solves a problem. They move onto making their code more efficient by learning about data types, variables and the three programming constructs including sequence, selection and iteration.

Term 3: Students undertake a practical, skills-based unit covering the principles of creating and formatting basic spreadsheets to produce and use simple computer models. The unit is centred around creating a financial model for a TV show. Students start by looking at different types of model and then use basic spreadsheet techniques to create and format a simple financial model to calculate the expected income from viewers’ voting. The model is then extended to include sales from merchandising, with the introduction of “what if” scenarios. Finally, the students create a seating plan, book seats and calculate income from seat sales. Spreadsheet features covered include SUM, MAX, IF and COUNTIF functions, cell naming for absolute referencing, conditional formatting, validation, charting and simple macros.

 

In Year 8 

Term 1: Students are introduced to a theoretical unit covering the basic principles of computer architecture and use of binary. They will look at the Input-Process-Output sequence and the Fetch-Decode-Execute cycle through practical activities. Students will perform simple binary to decimal conversions and vice versa, and learn how text characters are represented using the ASCII code. This is followed by some simple binary addition and later an in-depth study of how storage devices represent data using binary patterns.

Term 2: Students will learn the second programming language using a textual format in Python, a powerful but easy-to-use high-level programming language. The focus is on getting pupils to understand the process of developing programs, the importance of writing correct syntax, being able to formulate algorithms for simple programs and debugging their programs.

Term 3: Students are introduced to graphics and graphic file types. The unit explores how bitmap and vector images are represented and stored by the computer. There is also opportunity for students to practise skills in design, photo-editing and image manipulation using a Serif Draw Plus.

Unit Term Topic Theme Lesson Content
Year: 7 
  1 Autumn Introduction to ICT Information Technology Rules, Expectations and Shortcuts
  File Management Get organised
  Computer Crime and Cyber Security Email Scams
  Computer Misuse
  Protecting Personal Data
  Copyright
  Health & Safety
  2 Spring Introduction to Python Programming Strings and variables
  Data types and arithmetic
  Selection
  Writing algorithms
  While Loop
  Searching
  3 Summer Spreadsheet Modelling Spreadsheet  Computer Models
  Creating  Financial Model
  What IF' Scenarios
  Conditional Formatting and Validation
  Macros & Charts
Year: 8 
  4 Autumn Understanding Computers Hardware & processing Elements of a computer
  The CPU
  Data and Representation of Data Understanding Binary
  Binary Addition
  Hardware & processing Storage Devices
  Boolean Logic
  Information & Technologies Convergence & New Technologies
  5 Spring Python Next steps Programming The basics
  Loops
  Lists
  Introduction to functions
  Functions returning values
  More function returning values
  6 Summer Graphics Information Technology Introduction to Vector Graphics
  Bitmap Graphics
  Conveying Meaning
  Effects & Enhancements
  Adding Text

GCSE

Year 9 – Computer Science

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Convert denary to binary, binary to denary, hexadecimal to binary and vice versa including two’s compliments
  • Explain the use of binary codes to represent characters and understand the term ‘character set’
  • Explain the representation of an image as a series of pixels represented in binary and calculate the image file sizes making use of colour depth and resolution
  • Explain how sound can be sampled and stored in digital form
  • Perform binary arithmetic and logical binary shift
  • Explain the need for compression and understand encryption and decryption of messages
  • Explain the differences between unstructured and structured data and use databases to store data

Programming

  • identify and use variable types integer, real, Boolean, character and string
  • use arithmetic operations and Boolean operators including mod and div
  • show the results of basic string manipulation
  • use random number generation
  • write a simple problems involving sequence, selection and iteration
  • Explain and use simple functions and procedures that return values to the calling program
  • differentiate between types of error in programs (logic, syntax, runtime)

 

Term 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Problem Solving

 

  • state what is meant by an algorithm
  • define the term abstraction and explain how abstraction is used in given scenario
  • explain how decomposition may be used in an algorithm for a given problem
  • use a flowchart or pseudocode to define the steps in a simple algorithm
  • trace through a simple flowchart or pseudocode algorithm to determine the output
  • interpret, correct or complete a short algorithm
  • Programming
 
  • write pseudocode solutions to problems involving sequence, selection and iteration; and then write program code
  • use nested selection and iteration statements
  • use Boolean operations NOT, AND and OR within conditions for iterative and selection structures
  • use string manipulation functions in pseudocode solutions
  • give examples of and use data structures: arrays and records
  • use one-dimensional arrays in the design of solutions to simple problems
  • write simple functions and procedures using parameters
  • use a trace table to determine what value a variable will hold at a given point in a program
  • interpret error messages and identify, locate and fix errors in a program

Term 3

 

 

Problem Solving

  • explain how a binary search works
  • explain how a bubble sort works
  • state an advantage of the merge sort over the bubble sort
  • show the state of a list after the first pass in a bubble sort
  • list factors relevant to choosing and evaluating an algorithm

Programming

  • explain why data structures (arrays and records) are needed
  • use two-dimensional arrays in the design of solutions to simple problems
  • use, and explain why it is good practice to use local variables in subprograms
  • write functions and procedures using parameters
  • determine the strengths and weaknesses of a program and suggest improvements

 

Year 10 – Computer Science

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Convert denary to binary, binary to denary, hexadecimal to binary and vice versa including two’s compliments
  • Explain the use of binary codes to represent characters and understand the term ‘character set’
  • Explain the representation of an image as a series of pixels represented in binary and calculate the image file sizes making use of colour depth and resolution
  • Explain how sound can be sampled and stored in digital form
  • Perform binary arithmetic and logical binary shift
  • Explain the need for compression and understand encryption and decryption of messages
  • Explain the differences between unstructured and structured data and use databases to store data

 

Programming

  • identify and use variable types integer, real, Boolean, character and string
  • use arithmetic operations and Boolean operators including mod and div
  • show the results of basic string manipulation
  • use random number generation
  • write a simple problems involving sequence, selection and iteration
  • Explain and use simple functions and procedures that return values to the calling program
  • differentiate between types of error in programs (logic, syntax, runtime)

 

Term 2

Problem Solving

 

  • state what is meant by an algorithm
  • define the term abstraction and explain how abstraction is used in given scenario
  • explain how decomposition may be used in an algorithm for a given problem
  • explain how a binary search works
  • explain how a bubble sort works
  • state an advantage of the merge sort over the bubble sort
  • show the state of a list after the first pass in a bubble sort
  • use a flowchart or pseudocode to define the steps in a simple algorithm
  • trace through a simple flowchart or pseudocode algorithm to determine the output
  • interpret, correct or complete a short algorithm
  • list factors relevant to choosing and evaluating an algorithm

 

Programming

  • write pseudocode solutions to problems involving sequence, selection and iteration; and then write program code
  • use nested selection and iteration statements
  • use Boolean operations NOT, AND and OR within conditions for iterative and selection structures
  • use string manipulation functions in pseudocode solutions
  • give examples of and use data structures: arrays and records
  • use one-dimensional arrays in the design of solutions to simple problems
  • write simple functions and procedures using parameters
  • use a trace table to determine what value a variable will hold at a given point in a program
  • interpret error messages and identify, locate and fix errors in a program

Term 3

Computers

 

  • describe the role of the components of the CPU
  • explain the concept of the stored program computer
  • describe the steps in the fetch-decode-execute cycle
  • explain the concept of storing data in the “cloud”
  • describe the function of different types of memory (RAM, ROM, cache)
  • describe how data is stored on physical devices (magnetic, optical, solid state)
  • explain the need for embedded systems and their functions
  • construct truth tables for a given logic statement (AND, OR, NOT)
  • produce logic statements for simple problems
  • describe the functions of an operating system
  • describe the suitability of a high-level or low-level programming language for a particular task
  • describe the purpose and function of security and file management utility software
  • describe how software can be used to simulate and model aspects of the real world
  • describe the advantages and disadvantages of a compiler and an interpreter

 

Programming

  • explain why data structures (arrays and records) are needed
  • use two-dimensional arrays in the design of solutions to simple problems
  • use, and explain why it is good practice to use local variables in subprograms
  • read from and write to a text file
  • write functions and procedures using parameters
  • determine the strengths and weaknesses of a program and suggest improvements

 

 

Year 11 – Computer Science

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Non-Examined Assessment (NEA)

 

  • Solve a problem independently for controlled assessment (a scenario provided by exam board).

 

Programming

  • explain why data structures (arrays and records) are needed
  • use two-dimensional arrays in the design of solutions to simple problems
  • use, and explain why it is good practice to use local variables in subprograms
  • write functions and procedures using parameters
  • read from and write to a text file

Term 2

Communications

 

  • describe the nature of the Internet as a worldwide collection of computer networks
  • distinguish between the Internet and the World Wide Web
  • explain what is meant by a communications protocol and why it is needed such as TCP/IP, HTTP, FTP, POP3, SMTP, IMAP etc
  • explain the advantages of networking stand-alone computers into a local area network and distinguish between a LAN and a WAN
  • describe, using diagrams or otherwise the star, ring, bus and mesh network topologies and for each explain advantages and disadvantages
  • state that network data speeds are measured in bits per second (Mbps, Gbps)
  • list methods of authenticating users (passwords, biometric methods)
  • describe briefly different forms of cyberattack such as phishing and shoulder surfing
  • list methods of protecting a network (access control, physical security and firewalls)
  • describe black box and white box penetration testing

 

Bigger picture

  • Describe some environmental, ethical and legal issues in relation to a given scenario
  • List some privacy issues in relation to a given scenario
  • Give examples of proprietary and open source software
  • List one attribute and advantage of open source software and proprietary software
  • Evaluate the impact of and issues related to privacy arising from the use of computers in society

Term 3

Revision

  • Revisions covering all the topics including past papers.

 

Dance

 

Dance

Dance is expression through movement. Dance develops creativity, self-confidence and self-discipline. Dance allows students to express themselves through movement. Dance improves physical fitness, flexibility, agility, strength and posture. Dance develops an awareness of different forms of music and the way in which we relate to music.

Dance develops students ability to problem solve in a group and share ideas when creating group choreography.

A qualification in dance can lead to a career in theatre, teaching, performing, choreography

Year 7 – Performance and choreography 

  • Introduction to dance – actions space and dynamics
  • Contemporary choreography using a prop
  • Contemporary performance in a narrative dance.
  • Musical theatre – Annie

Year 8 – performance and choreography using different dance styles.

  • Jazz and salsa in musical theatre – West Side Story
  • Jazz performance – Hairspray
  • Rock and roll performance
  • Narrative choreography
  • Performance and choreography blending Martials Arts and contemporary dance.

Performance, choreography and analysis of professional dance practitioners.

  • Christopher Bruce – Ghost Dances explores political oppression.
  • Afrobeats – the life and work of Fela Kuti
  • Christopher Bruce – Swansong explores the plight of political prisoners
  • Alvin Ailey - Revelations tells the story of African-American faith and tenacity from slavery to freedom.
Unit Term Topic Theme Lesson Content
Year: 7 
  1 Autumn 1 Introduction to dance Performance Warm up, actions, unison, timing
  Levels, dynamics, balance.
  Rehearsal skills, performance.
  Developing movement using space.
  Developing movement using canon
  Rehearsal skills in choreography.
  Performance to an audience with concentration.
  Evaluation of performance/ target setting for improvement.
  2 Autumn 2 Annie Choreography Using Lyrics to inform movement.
  Narrative choreography.
  Using character in choreography.
  Using music to inform dynamics.
  Developing movement in quartets
  Developing rehearsal skills.
  Performance to an audience with commitment.
  Evaluation of performance/ target setting for improvement.
  3 Spring 1 Duet choreography using props Performing using complementary movement.
  Performing using contrast.
  Choreography using a prop.
  Choreography using contrast and complement.
  Performance to an audience
  Evaluation of performance/ target setting for improvement.
  4 Spring 2 Group choreography using props Formations, contrasting directions, use of prop to enhance movement.
  Sources for choreography.
  Choreographic structure
  Developing movement using contact.
  Performance to an audience
  Evaluation of performance/ target setting for improvement.
  5 Summer 1 West Side Story Performance Style - jazz/salsa
  Performing using lyrics to inform timing.
  Choreography using lyrics.
  Changing formations in choreography.
  Performance to an audience with confidence.
  Evaluation of performance/ target setting for improvement.
  6 Summer 2 Narrative Choreography - duets Choreography Narrative choreography.
  Planning and structuring choreograhy.
  Dynamics in relation to music.
  Developing character through movement.
  Performance to an audience
  Evaluation of performance/ target setting for improvement.
Year: 8 
  1 Autumn 1 Martial Arts and Dance Performance Strength, extension, flexibility.
  Posture, alignment, contrasting dynamics.
  Refining performance of set movement
  Developing movement using dynamics and space.
  Developing flexibility and strength.
  Using strength and flexibility in performance.
  Performance to an audience with energy.
  Evaluation of performance/ target setting for improvement.
  2 Autumn 2 Hairspray Style - jazz.
  Precision and co-ordination.
  Developing precision and isolations in movement.
  Developing movement using style.
  Refining performance of set movement
  further developmant of movement using style.
  Performance to an audience using movement memory.
  Evaluation of performance/ target setting for improvement.
  3 Spring 1 Fela Developing use of strength in the arms.
  Using muscle tension in performance.
  Group contact/lifts
  Choreography in a particular style - jazz/African
  Performance to an audience
  Evaluation of performance/ target setting for improvement.
  4 Spring 2 Ghost Dances Choreography Using dynamics and mobility in performance to portray a character.
  Using contrast within a narrative dance including elevation and mobility.
  Using contact within a narrative dance.
  Structuring a narrative.
  Performance to an audience using focus.
  Evaluation of performance/ target setting for improvement.
  5 Summer 1 Shadows Structuring a dance using narrative.
  Creating movement based on character.
  Developing movement based on character.
  Refining choreography
  Performance to an audience
  Evaluation of performance/ target setting for improvement.
  6 Summer 2 Swansong Features of a dance production.
  Relationships in choreography.
  Choreographic processes
  Lighting
  Performance to an audience
  Evaluation of performance/ target setting for improvement.

Year 9

Term 1

Unit 1

  • Students will learn what technical performance skills are – 

Actions, space, dynamics, timing, musicality

and use them in practical work when learning performance phrases.

 

Unit 2

  • Students will learn what physical performance skills are –  Strength, stamina, flexibility, coordination, mobility, isolation, alignment, posture.

Students will be able to identify where these are used in practical work and give the definitions.

Unit 3

  • Students will learn how to develop motifs using character in narrative choreography.
  • Students will learn how to develop motifs using a range of developments:

Space, dynamics, levels, fragmentation, retrograde, travelling.

  • Students will learn how to describe motifs and explain how they are developed.
  • Students will learn how to analyse an image and identify the elements that could be used as a stimulus for choreography.

 

Year 9

Term 2

Unit 1

  • Students will learn how to use a professional dance work as a stimulus for choreography by analysing the movement
  • Students will learn how to create solo motifs using action cards.
  • Students will learn how to develop movement in a trio using isolations, contrast, contact.

Unit 2

  • Students will learn how to prepare a group dance for performance using technical and expressive performance skills:

Actions, space, dynamics, timing, musicality

  • Students will learn to analyse their own performance through video and set targets for improvement.

 

Year 9

Term 3

Unit 1

  • Students will learn a performance trio. They will improve their skills of using dance relationship in their performance:
  • Lead and follow
  • Action and reaction
  • Contrast
  • Contact
  • Formations
  • Mirroring
  • Complement
  • Accumulation

Unit 2

  • Students will study the professional set work Emancipation of Expressionism. They will learn to analyse the piece looking at choreographic intention in relation to set/costume/lighting/music/movement.
  • Students will use performance skills to learn phrases from the work.
  • Students will use the choreographic approach of the work to create and develop motifs that will be used in the creation of a performance piece.

 

Year 10

Term 1

Unit 1

  • Students will study the professional set work A Linha Curva. They will learn to analyse the piece looking at choreographic intention in relation to set/costume/lighting/music/movement.
  • Students will learn to compare two different professional works in short and long answer questions.
  • Students will use performance skills to learn phrases from the work.
  • Students will use the choreographic approach of the work to create and develop motifs that will be used in the creation of a performance piece.
  • Students will perform the finished piece, developing their skills of performing to an audience.

Unit 2

  • Students will study the professional set work Shadows. They will learn to analyse the piece looking at choreographic intention in relation to set/costume/lighting/music/movement.
  • Students will learn to compare three different professional works in short and long answer questions.
  • Students will develop their narrative choreography skills, identifying structural elements, character and use of props. They will use this analysis to inform their choreography.

 

Year 10

Term 2

Unit 1

  • Students will study the professional set work Infra. They will learn to analyse the piece looking at choreographic intention in relation to set/costume/lighting/music/movement.
  • Students will create short solo’s using the choreographic technique of the choreographer Wayne McGregor.
  • Students will use advanced motif development techniques using space/contact/contrast/fragmentation/travelling/dynamics.

Unit 2

  • Students will study the professional set work Within Her Eyes. They will learn to analyse the piece looking at choreographic intention in relation to set/costume/lighting/music/movement.
  • Students will learn exam technique focusing on section C of the written exam which analyses the set works.
  • Students will learn about dance for the camera and site sensitive work through practical tasks in a variety of locations around school.

 

Year 10

Term 3

Unit 1

  • Students will study the professional set work Artificial Things. They will learn to analyse the piece looking at choreographic intention in relation to set/costume/lighting/music/movement.

 

Unit 2

  • Students will learn the two set performance phrases. They will consolidate their ability to use physical, technical and expressive performance skills.
  • Students will analyse rehearsal techniques in relation to their own performance classwork. They will build 6 mark answers from section B of the exam paper using this technique.

 

Year 11

Term 1

Unit 1

  • Students will perfect their set phrases. They will consolidate and perfect their ability to use physical, technical and expressive performance skills. They will perform the finished solo phrases to camera which will comprise 15% of their GCSE grade.
  •  

Unit 2

  • Students will learn the performance duet. They will consolidate and perfect their ability to use physical, technical and expressive performance skills. They will perform the finished duet to camera which will comprise 20% of their GCSE grade.

 

 

Year 11

Term 2

Unit 1

  • Students will create their final choreography pieces using the stimulus provided by the exam board. They will use:
  • Actions and dynamics
  • Dance relationships and choreographic devices
  • Structure
  • Aural setting
  • Students will analyse choreography techniques in relation to their own work. They will build 6 mark answers from section B of the exam paper using this technique.

Unit 2

  • Students will complete and perform to camera their final choreography pieces. This will comprise 25% of their GCSE grade.
  • Students will focus on section A of the written exam which asks questions about hypothetical choreography using: Motif and development/structure/music/relationships/choreographic devices.

 

Year 11

Term 3

Unit 1

  • Students will learn to analyse exam questions and use all their consolidated knowledge to answer the paper.

 

 

 

Design and Technology

Our mission is to provide opportunities for pupils at Bishop Challoner to develop as well rounded individuals who are confident and capable of realising their full potential, through application of acquired skills and problem solving. We see the preparation of our pupils for citizenship in a global technological society as integral to our planning of teaching and learning. To that end we are developing our links with cutting edge designers, universities, Colleges, Art and Design, Science and engineering organisations and industry specialists to bring the real world technological experiences into the classroom.

The DT curriculum at KS3 is delivered to all pupils over three years. We offer pupils Resistant Materials, Food Technology, Product Design / Graphics and Food Technology, in a carousel arrangement. This means that pupils get to complete nine to twelve week modules with subject teachers that specialise in the subject areas. Upon arrival in Year 7 all Students are given a baseline assessment which allows us as a Faculty to determine where each Student is and to some extent identify areas they may have a particular flair for.   Furthermore, they are given interim assessments at the end of modules two and four to facilitate tracking of pupil progress throughout the academic year.  In this way we build a clear trackable picture of the individual student’s attainment and progression. KS3 students (years 7 and 9), have a double period in each week lasting 100 minutes. 

Year 7- Textiles-the Monster project. Graphics-The Olympic coin project (CAD/CAM and pewter casting). Resistant materials- Two mini projects covering basic tool and machinery skills. Food- Fruit and vegetables are the focus during this module, which consists of at least six different focused practical tasks.

Year 8- Textiles- the pop Art inspired cushion project. Graphics- The interactive book (Mechanisms).  Resistant materials- Childs Toy. Food- Special diets are the focus during this module, which consists of at least six different focused practical tasks.

Unit Term Topic Theme Lesson Content
Year: 7 
  1 Autumn 1 Health and Safety and polymers H+S General Health and Safety.
  tools Understand which tools go with which materials.
  plastics Understand about polymers. Learn about environmental issues
  practical Working with plastic. How to mark + cut out, finish  + join. Start design ideas
  designing Understand importance of development  of initial ideas + final idea in 3D.
  making Making, differentiate and use a variety  of finishing tools to complete key fob
  assessment All to complete baseline test. All to check result. All will resit + improve.
  2 Autumn 2 Motion and Mechanisms designing To understand what the design brief is and how to analyse it. Research (homework - to gather information and examples of pop up cards)
  Analysis of research, Specification and design ideas 
  modelling modelling of card mechanisms
  making making up the layers for the card
 
  making and testing making up the layers for the card and testing the cards
  Evaluate Write up end of term evaluation using literacy mat  (homework - revise all work for end of term 1 test)
  4 Spring 2 Materials - Timber and wood joints Industrial practicses Work and industry, Mechanical, electrical and farming / logo design
  designing Create a logo based on their chosen industry
  Materials Materials - categories of timber, properties and uses.
  Wood joints
  Making Making - wood joint
 
  5 Summer 1 Product design Designing Design brief and analysis for industrial promotional goods
  designing Specification, design ideas  and analysis. Development of one, two or more designs
  Designing and planning Final design. What is a cutting list?
  List the manufacturing plan
  Making Making promotional good -correct use of tools with supervision
  Summer 2 Making promotional good - independently working
  summer 2 Making promotional good - accuracy
  Making promotional good - quality of build
  Testing Tesing the success if final product
  Evaluating Written evaluation of manufacture
  Evaluating and green pen
Year: 8 
  2 Autumn 1 Graphic design Designing What is Graphic design? Methods of communication and planning and producing a front cover sheet, give clear marking criteria
  Design brief (the event), initial ideas and evaluation of ideas.
  Graphics What is isometric projection? Final design of an event product, look at smart materials
  What is perspective drawing? Final design of an event product.
  3D city 
  Evaluation Evaluation of event project.
  3 Autumn 2 Electronics Circuit theory and soldering safety What is a circuit and how a circuit works / how to solder safely
  Imput components What are they, battery clip, pp3, current, switch and LDR
  Circuit control / process What is a transistor and how does it work / multi core wire and strain holes
  Resistors What are they, how do they work and the colour code
  Output components Examples of outputs / LEDs and how to insultae components
  Report writing and practical Literacy task about how the circuit works / planning the task
  Literacy task about how the circuit works / controlled assessment
  4 Spring 1 Materials - Timber and wood joints Industrial practicses Work and industry, Mechanical, electrical and farming / logo design
  designing Create a logo based on their chosen industry
  Materials Materials - categories of timber, properties and uses.
  Wood joints
  Making Making - wood joint
 
  5 Spring 2 Product design Designing Design brief and analysis and research for industrial promotional goods
  designing Specification and design ideas and development of at least 3 designs
  Designing and planning Final design. What is a cutting list?
  List the manufacturing plan
  Summer 1 Making Modelling promotional good
  Making promotional good
 
  6 Evaluating Testing and Written evaluation of manufacture
  Summer 2 Design history and CAD/CAM Research History of design movements, styles and designers
  Research and designing Study the work of two different designers and create designs for a clock based on their work. Design development, 
  CAD Tutorial on 2D design. Draw 4 of the best designs  onto 2D design and develop them, peer assessment about designs
  Draw final design on 2D design
  CAM How does a laser machine work. Industry and school. Write a report matching clocks to spec and customers
  Making and evaluation. Continue with report and complete clocks

 

What you will study at GCSE 

At GCSE students gain awareness and learn from wider influences on design and technology including historical, social, cultural, environmental and economic factors. Students get the opportunity to work creatively when designing and making and apply technical and practical expertise. At KS4 both boys and girls can select AQA product Design and WJEC Catering. However only the girls are offered Textiles. Students complete a design and make controlled assessment, which is worth 50% 0f the course grade over 30 hours. They then complete one 2 hour examination paper which is worth 50% of the final grade. (WJEC Catering 60% for two practical controlled assessment tasks and 40% for the exam paper )

 

Year

10-11

 

Unit

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

New and emerging technologies 3.1.1

  • Robotics, automation and production in industry
  • Production techniques and systems – automation
  • Enterprise
  • Market pull and technology push
  • People, society and culture

 

  • Sustainability and the environment
  • Critical evaluation of new and emerging technologies – planned obsolescence
  • Design for maintenance
  • Ethics
  • The environment

 

 

Energy generation and storage 3.1.2

  • Nuclear energy
  • Energy storage
  • Kinetic pumped storage systems
  • Alkaline and rechargeable batteries
  • Renewable and non-renewable resources

 

 

Systems approach to designing 3.1.4

  • Systems

 

Mechanical devices 3.1.5

  • Types of motion

 

Developments in new materials 3.1.3

  • Modern materials
  • Smart materials
  • Composite materials
  • Technical Textiles

 

Materials and their working properties 3.1.6

  • Material properties

 

Selection of materials or components 3.2.1

Using and working with materials 3.2.5

 

Example NEA style project to cover 3.2 Section B – Project 1 MP3 docking station/storage.

Introducing the idea of iterative thinking.

  • Functionality
  • Aesthetics
  • Environmental factors
  • Availability
  • Cost
  • Social factors
  • Ethical factors

 

Communication of ideas 3.3.5

Designing:

  • sketching
  • modelling
  • testing

evaluation of work.

 

Ecological and social footprint 3.2.3

  • The six Rs
  • Ecological issues in design and manufacture

 

Design Strategies 3.3.4

Communication of ideas 3.3.5

Ecological and social footprint 3.2.3

Designing:

  • sketching
  • modelling
  • testing
  • evaluation of work.

 

Using and working with materials 3.2.5

  • Properties of materials
  • Modifying properties for a purpose

 

Sources and origins 3.2.4

Stock forms types and sizes 3.2.6

  • Commercially available types and sizes of materials

 

Communication of ideas 3.3.5

Scales of production 3.2.7

Designing:

  • sketching
  • modelling
  • testing
  • evaluation of work.

 

Investigation, primary and secondary data 3.3.1

Communication of ideas 3.3.5

 

  • Manufacturing specification/working drawings

Term 2

Specialist techniques and processes 3.2.8

Material Management 3.3.9

  • Tools, equipment and processes
  • Quality control

 

Specialist techniques and processes 3.2.8

Material management 3.3.9

  • How materials are cut, shaped and formed to a tolerance
  • Quality control

 

 

Surface treatments and finishes 3.2.9

  • The preparation and application of surface treatments and finishes
  • Quality control Surface treatments and finishes
  • Quality control

 

Forces and stresses 3.2.2

  • Types of forces and reinforcing materials
  • Manipulating materials to resist/work with forces

 

 

  • Example NEA style project to cover 3.3 Section C – Project 2 (lighting).
  • Building iteration into a project in preparation for the NEA.

 

 

The work of others 3.3.3

 

  • Investigate, analyse and evaluate the work of past and present designers/ companies

 

Design strategies 3.3.4

Communication of design ideas 3.3.5

  • Generating imaginative and creative designs

 

Investigation, primary and secondary data 3.3.1

  • Using primary and secondary data to understand client and/or user needs.
  • Market research, interviews, human factors

 

Environmental, social and economic challenge 3.3.2

  • Constraints that are presented to designers

 

Investigation, primary and secondary data 3.3.1

  • How to write a design brief

 

Design strategies 3.3.4

Communication of design ideas 3.3.5

  • Generating imaginative and creative designs

 

Investigation, primary and secondary data 3.3.1

  • How to write a design specification

 

Communication of design ideas 3.3.5

  • Isometric and perspective designs
  • Exploded diagrams
  • Working drawings
  • Computer-based tools
  • Audio and visual recordings
  • Modelling

 

Prototype development 3.3.6

  • Satisfy the requirements of the brief
  • Functionality
  • Aesthetics
  • Potentially marketable

 

Selection of materials and components 3.3.7

  • Materials are selected based on functionality, cost and availability

 

Tolerances 3.3.8

 

  • Working accurately

 

 

Material management 3.3.9

  • Cutting, shaping and forming materials to tolerance
  • Planning the cutting of materials to minimize waste (linking to tolerance)

 

Selection of materials and components 3.3.7

Material management 3.3.9

  • Using measuring and marking out to create and accurate and quality prototype

 

Specialist tools and equipment 3.3.10

 

  • Selection of the correct hand tools and machinery
  • Safe use of tools

 

 

Specialist techniques and processes 3.3.11

  • Selection and use of specialist techniques (used to shape, fabricate, construct)
  • Preparing a material for a surface finish
  • Applying a surface finish

 

Specialist tools and equipment 3.3.10

Using and working with materials 3.2.5

Specialist techniques and processes 3.3.11

Surface treatments and finishes 3.3.11

  • Selection of the correct hand tools and machinery.
  • Safe use of tools
  • Selection and use of specialist techniques (used to shape, fabricate, construct)
  • Preparing a material for a surface finish
  • Applying a surface finish

Term 3

Using and working with materials 3.2.5

  • How materials can be altered to change their properties

 

Scales of production 3.2.7

  • Scales of production

 

Specialist techniques and processes 3.2.8

  • Commercial processes

Term 4

 

Year 11 term 1 will be spent on the NEA.

It’s intended to be an iterative process so the learning activities will be directed by the student and will depend on their project.

 

Term 5-6

Mock exams

 

 

NEA

Improvements after moderation

 

Revision

 

 

 

Drama

*Want to be a good Diagnostician in medicine? You need an imagination.
 

*Want to be a lawyer who owns the courtroom with persuasive ideas that win the case? You need an imagination. 

*Want to be an internationally best-selling author? You need an imagination. 

*Want to be a BAFTA award winning actor/actress? You need an imagination. 

To generate those ideas that make you stand out from the crowd, you need to develop and practice that imagination…continually.

To generate those ideas that make you stand out from the crowd, you need to develop and practice that imagination…continually.

In Drama, we do just that. Through extensive practical explorations combined with rigorous theoretical analyses, you will become a confident, creative communicator not just on stage but in the board room, the courtroom and the work arena.

Year 7 - The students explore and acquire a plethora of Drama strategies as they undergo an introduction to Drama at secondary level. From improvisation to physical theatre, they’ll collaborate and create original works based on the theme of “change” – a relevant theme in these young person’s life entering secondary school for the first time.

Year 8 – Students embark on an area of Dramatic study that is entirely text-based. From Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein to Shakespeare’s The Tempest, students will learn how to analyse a text from both a performer and director’s perspective. Developing their use of voice and physicality, your child will learn how to bring a text to life for the stage in a visually engaging and skilful way.

Unit Term Topic Theme Lesson Content
Year: 7 
  1 Autumn 1 Introduction to Drama Improvisation Key skills and stimulus based devising
  Slow motion and Still image Key components of conventions, abstract nouns and refining use of movement
  Monologue Structuring a monologue, sensory exploration and vocal skills. 
  Autumn 2 Physical theatre  Responding to music and theme of change through different elements of movement
  cross-cutting  still-image, modelling of effective cross-cutting, application to a devised piece of work.
  Narration and role play characterisation, mind-map of climate change, elements of quality of narration
  introduction to Drama Assessment vocabulary test, formative assessment on use of soft skills during collaboration
  2 Spring 1 Devising Stimulus-based exploration celebrating differences, mind-mapping, basic structure to a devised play through still image
  Exposition character profiles and hot-seating
  Rising action  Freytag's structure, establishing dilemma's, application of key conventions
  performance  progress check on devising - formative assessment
  Spring 2 Falling action and climax Mind-map, revise creative intentions, resolving the dilemmas in the plot.
  performance  dress rehearsal - formative feedback on performance and use of Drama strategies
  Assessment Use of key drama convetions within a 5 minute piece of drama - summative. 
Year: 8 
  7 Autumn 1 Frankenstein text-based exploration physical skills including levels and proxemics within a text
  vocal skills, character development and analysis
  Character development through exploration of the given circumstances and hot-seating
  Autumn 2 The Tempest Accessing the language of Shakespeare through given circumstances
  Exploring status and communicating themes through performance skills
  Performance and formative assessment. 
  8 Spring 1 Mugged Analysis of scene 1 and establishing character profiles. Practical exploration through still image and direct address
  Analysis of Scene 2 and 3 through exploration of given circumstances and cross-cutting. Performance. 
  Analysis of scene 3 exploring reactions and vocal skills. Discussion on social and cultural relevance to themes of crime and poverty
  Spring 2 performance  Rehearsal, performance and refinement
  9
  Formative assessment. 

Year 9

Term 1

Theatrical Conventions

Students will identify and describe the key theatrical conventions needed for devising a piece of drama.

 

Students will practically explore the key theatrical conventions in order to develop their understanding of style and structure of a short play.

 

Students will analyse their use of key vocal and physical skills.

 

Students will evaluate their use of key vocal and physical skills.

 

Students will incorporate key evaluative and subject-specific terminology into their evaluations when comparing performances.

 

Students will develop their ability to generate ideas and collaborate timely and effectively.

 

 

 

 

Year 9

Term 2

Devising  

Students will create a short play using Freytag’s structure.

 

Students will respond to stimuli in an in-depth way – transforming ideas into reality.

 

Students will learn how to analyse and evaluate the creative process.

 

Students will rehearse and refine their work to communicate clearly to their audiences.

 

Students will recall on style and structure before explaining how these elements have been considered.

 

Students will reflect on their creative process and personal contribution as they prepare for written exams.

Year 9

Term 3

Theatre Makers in Practice

Students will identify and discuss opinions on the themes and characters within a text.

 

Students will practically explore the characters and plot of a text.

 

Students will recall on performance elements as they practically re-create moments from the text.

 

Students will be able to justify their directorial decisions.

 

Students will analyse how performance elements can be used to direct characters from the text on stage.

 

Students will compare key themes and moments from a text as they suggest links for similar direction of actors. 

 

Students will develop an understanding of command words in the exam questions.

 

Students will refine their ability to write exam responses under timed conditions.

 

 

Year 10

Term 1

C1

Students will recall how meaning is extracted from stimuli and analyse their personal response.

 

Students will generate ideas extrapolated from a variety of stimuli and construct an original piece of theatre using key theatrical conventions.

 

Students will interpret assessment criteria in order to develop their ability to evaluate the work of others and their own creative process.

 

Students will suggest ideas for development as they refine practical work and record the process of refinement through in-depth analysis.

C3

Students will practically recall upon and explore the themes and characters within each act of the prescribed text of study.

 

Students will recall on the command words of lower level exam questions and compare with the higher level exam questions in the paper.

 

Students will explain the context that the play was written in as they apply this to the written responses to higher level exam-style questions.

Year 10

Term 2

C1

Students will develop an understanding of Brecht’s methodologies and respond to the theory of “Epic Theatre”

 

Students will apply the methodologies of “Epic Theatre” to their own devised piece as they consolidate their communication of a key message or aim to their audience.

 

Students will evaluate their application of methodologies in written responses to key questions for their coursework.

 

Students will develop exam strategies for practical examination of devised piece in front of a live audience.

 

Students will evaluate the impact of the final performance and submit coursework.

C3

Students will compare the impact of sound and lighting in order to create impact for an audience.

 

Students create ideas for staging the prescribed text for an audience with a focus on lighting and sound.

 

Students will explain how costume can create impact and communicate context for a live audience.

 

Students will explain how performance skills can be used to interpret characters on stage.

 

Students will justify responses linked to in-depth knowledge of context of the play

 

Students will apply exam strategies for answering section A of the exam paper.

Year 10

Term 3

C3

Students will reflect upon and apply feedback to the exam paper.

 

Students will compare key characters and analyse the similarities of their performance in various acts within the text.

 

Students will analyse exemplar responses to the exam questions and link to the assessment criteria.

 

Students will develop their ability to formulate concise ideas for production and performance of the prescribed text under timed conditions.

C2

Students will interpret and explore two key extracts from a text that will be performed and examined.

 

Students will analyse their performance text as they identify ‘The Given Circumstances’ and apply annotations to the text focused on physical and vocal skills.

 

Students will begin rehearsing and evaluating their work and the work of others using the assessment criteria.

 

Students will examine how proxemics and staging can communicate meaning for a live audience.

 

Students will memorise lines in order to develop credibility to their performance and improve characterisation.

 

Students will receive formative feedback on their performed extract and refine their work by applying the feedback received from external peers and professionals.

 

Year 11

Term 1

C2

Students will rehearse and refine the staging of their group performance

 

Students will memorise lines and rehearse off-script

 

Students will consider and apply the assessment criteria to their performance by focusing on varied and controlled use of vocality

 

Students will consider and apply the assessment criteria to their performance by focusing on varied and controlled use of physicality

C3

Students will critically analyse a live performance

 

Students will consolidate their understanding of the requirements for evaluating and analysing a live performance

 

Students will consolidate their understanding of the performance and production elements of staging the prescribed set text

 

Students will refine their ability to write under timed exam conditions

 

Students will interpret the directorial decisions and intentions of a live performance

 

Students will evaluate the impact of performance and production elements on audiences.

Year 11

Term 2

C2

Students will perform a credible performance in front of a visiting examiner

C3

Students will consolidate their knowledge and understanding of the themes and plot within the prescribed text

 

Students will develop and apply exam strategies for analysing a live performance

 

Students will develop and apply exam strategies for evaluating a live performance

 

Students will develop and apply exam strategies writing as a director for a prescribed text

 

Students will develop and apply exam strategies writing as a designer for a prescribed text

Year 11

Term 3

 

Revision until May exam (2nd week)

Economics

 

Year 9 OCR Economics (9-1) - GCSE

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term  1

1. Introduction to Economics

 

1.1 Main economic groups and factors of production

  • Identify main economic groups and factors of production
  • Explain the factors of production: land, labour, capital and enterprise, including how they might be combined

 

1.2 The basic economic problem

  • Explain what is meant by scarce resources and unlimited wants
  • Explain the economic problem, including the questions of how resources should be allocated, what, for whom and how goods and services should be produced
  • Explain what is meant by opportunity cost
  • Evaluate the costs and benefits of economic choices, including the impact on economic, social and environmental sustainability

 

2. The role of markets and money

 

2.1 The role of markets

  • Explain what is meant by a market
  • Explain the features of the primary, secondary and tertiary sectors, including the difference between the production of products and services
  • Explain the difference between factor and product markets, including their interdependence
  • Evaluate the costs and benefits of specialisation and exchange in markets including for producers, workers, regions and countries

 

2.2 Demand

  • Explain what is meant by demand
  • Draw and explain a demand curve using data, including individual and market demand
  • Draw shifts of, and movements along, the demand curve
  • Analyse the causes and consequences for consumers and producers, of shifts of, and movements along, the demand curve
  • Explain price elasticity of demand
  • Draw demand curves of different elasticity
  • Evaluate the importance of price elasticity

 

 

Term 2

2. The role of markets and money

 

2.3 Supply

  • Explain what is meant by supply
  • Draw and explain a supply curve using data, including individual and market supply
  • Draw shifts of, and movements along, the supply curve
  • Analyse the causes and consequences for consumers and producers, of shifts of, and movements along, the supply curve
  • Explain price elasticity of supply
  • Draw supply curves of different elasticity
  • Evaluate the importance of price elasticity of supply for consumers and producers

 

2.4 Price

  • Explain price as a reflection of worth and its role in determining an efficient distribution of resources
  • Explain what is meant by equilibrium price and quantity
  • Draw and analyse the interaction of demand and supply
  • Explain the role of markets in the determination of price and the allocation of resources
  • Analyse how the market forces of demand and supply affect equilibrium price and quantity

Term 3

2. The role of markets and money

 

2.5 Competition

  • Explain competition between producers in a market economy, including the reasons why producers compete
  • Analyse how competition affects price
  • Evaluate the economic impact of competition on producers and consumers
  • Explain the meaning of monopoly and oligopoly and how they differ from competitive markets

 

2.6 Production

  • Explain the role of producers, including individuals, firms and the government
  • Evaluate the importance of production and productivity for the economy
  • Calculate and explain total cost, average cost, total revenue, average revenue, profit and loss
  • Evaluate the importance of cost, revenue, profit and loss for producers, including how costs and revenues affect profit and supply
  • Explain what is meant by economies of scale

Assessment

Regular class topic tests, Multiple choice questions, Extended essays, Research tasks & Exam questions.

 

 

 

 

Year 10 OCR Economics (9-1) - GCSE

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term  1

1. Introduction to Economics

 

1.1 Main economic groups and factors of production

  • Identify main economic groups and factors of production
  • Explain the factors of production: land, labour, capital and enterprise, including how they might be combined

 

1.2 The basic economic problem

  • Explain what is meant by scarce resources and unlimited wants
  • Explain the economic problem, including the questions of how resources should be allocated, what, for whom and how goods and services should be produced
  • Explain what is meant by opportunity cost
  • Evaluate the costs and benefits of economic choices, including the impact on economic, social and environmental sustainability

 

2. The role of markets and money

 

2.1 The role of markets

  • Explain what is meant by a market
  • Explain the features of the primary, secondary and tertiary sectors, including the difference between the production of products and services
  • Explain the difference between factor and product markets, including their interdependence
  • Evaluate the costs and benefits of specialisation and exchange in markets including for producers, workers, regions and countries

 

2.2 Demand

  • Explain what is meant by demand
  • Draw and explain a demand curve using data, including individual and market demand
  • Draw shifts of, and movements along, the demand curve
  • Analyse the causes and consequences for consumers and producers, of shifts of, and movements along, the demand curve
  • Explain price elasticity of demand
  • Draw demand curves of different elasticity
  • Evaluate the importance of price elasticity

 

2.3 Supply

  • Explain what is meant by supply
  • Draw and explain a supply curve using data, including individual and market supply
  • Draw shifts of, and movements along, the supply curve

Term 2

2. The role of markets and money

 

2.3 Supply (continued)

  • Analyse the causes and consequences for consumers and producers, of shifts of, and movements along, the supply curve
  • Explain price elasticity of supply
  • Draw supply curves of different elasticity
  • Evaluate the importance of price elasticity of supply for consumers and producers

 

2.4 Price

  • Explain price as a reflection of worth and its role in determining an efficient distribution of resources
  • Explain what is meant by equilibrium price and quantity
  • Draw and analyse the interaction of demand and supply
  • Explain the role of markets in the determination of price and the allocation of resources
  • Analyse how the market forces of demand and supply affect equilibrium price and quantity

 

2.5 Competition

  • Explain competition between producers in a market economy, including the reasons why producers compete
  • Analyse how competition affects price
  • Evaluate the economic impact of competition on producers and consumers
  • Explain the meaning of monopoly and oligopoly and how they differ from competitive markets

 

2.6 Production

  • Explain the role of producers, including individuals, firms and the government
  • Evaluate the importance of production and productivity for the economy
  • Calculate and explain total cost, average cost, total revenue, average revenue, profit and loss
  • Evaluate the importance of cost, revenue, profit and loss for producers, including how costs and revenues affect profit and supply
  • Explain what is meant by economies of scale

Term 3

2. The role of markets and money

 

  1. The labour market

 

  • explain the role and operation of the labour market, including the interaction between workers and employers
  • analyse the determination of wages through supply and demand, including factors affecting the supply and demand of labour
  • explain and calculate gross and net pay, including deductions through income tax, national insurance and pension contributions

 

2.8 The role of money and financial markets

  • explain the role of money as a medium of exchange
  • explain the role of the financial sector for the economy, including financial institutions such as banks, building societes and insurance companies
  • evaluate the importance of the financial sector for consumers, producers and government
  • analyse how different interest rates affect the levels of saving, borrowing and investment
  • calculate the effect on savings and borrowings of changes in the rate of interest.

 

3. Economic objectives and the role of government

 

3.1 Economic growth

  • explain what is meant by economic growth
  • calculate and explain how economic growth is measured with reference to Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and GDP per capita
  • analyse recent and historical GDP data
  • analyse the determinants of economic growth, including investment, changes in technology, size of workforce, education and training, availability of natural resources and government policies
  • evaluate the costs and benefits of economic growth, including the impact on economic, social and environmental sustainability

 

3.2 Low unemployment

  • explain what is meant by employment and unemployment
  • explain how unemployment is measured using the Claimant Count
  • calculate the unemployment rate
  • analyse recent and historical unemployment figures
  • explain the types of unemployment, including cyclical, frictional, seasonal and structural unemployment
  • evaluate the causes and consequences of unemployment for individuals, regions and the government

Assessment

Regular class topic tests, Multiple choice questions, Extended essays, Research tasks & Exam questions.

 

 

English

English

The study of English provides the fundamental skills necessary to create opportunities for our students and their futures. By studying a variety of texts, both fiction and non-fiction, students are not only prepared for their GCSE and A-Level exams, but are also given a solid foundation on which to build analytical skills and an enjoyment of reading. The curriculum has been carefully designed at each key stage to stretch and challenge pupils to reach their full potential. In addition to classroom lessons, the English faculty also offers a variety of after school clubs and writing competitions to celebrate the talent of our students.

Year 7:

Play scripts (e.g. Frankenstein, Dracula, Noughts and Crosses, The Demon Headmaster)

Novels (e.g. Private Peaceful)

A Collection of Short Stories

A Collection of Poems

Non-fiction texts

Year 8:

Novels (e.g. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, Wonder, Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry)

Fantasy Genre Texts

Character and Voice Poetry Anthology

20th Century Novels (e.g. Call of the Wild, To Kill a Mockingbird)

A Shakespeare Play (e.g. Romeo and Juliet, The Tempest, A Midsummer Night’s Dream)

Unit Term Topic Theme Lesson Content
Year: 7 
  1 Autumn 1 Frankenstein Play Context Setting, time, social conditions, author
  Character and plot characters and plot
  Language use Language and ideas
  Writer's motives/message Writer's views
  Themes Use of themes
  Performance Performance aspect of the play
  Analysis Commenting on the text with evidence
  2 Autumn 2 Novel Context Author and historical context
  Identify  Develop 'identify' skill
  Imagery and figurative language Imagery and figurative language in the text
  Theme Key themes and presentation in the text
  Explain and analyse Develop 'Explain' and 'analyse' skill
  TBC TBC
  Evaluation Evaulation skills for assessment
  3 Spring 1 Introduction to Shakespeare Analysis/ gather ideas Read text 1 and annotate meaning
  Read text 2 and annotate meaning
  Comparision Compare theme in both texts/similarities and differences
  Form Features of form e.g. autobiography
  Planning Independent skills: Planning their own piece of writing
  Writing  What to include in their writing/SPAG/ Write Assessment 
  4 Spring 2 Poetry Context Setting, time, social conditions, author
  Characters and theme characters and theme presentation
  Language use Language and ideas
  Writer's motives/message Writer's views
  Theme  Theme potrayal
  Comparision Compare 2 extracts for theme/character
  5 Summer 1 Gothic Fiction Devices Poetic devices/ SPLITT Acronym
  Structure How poem 1 is structured
  Writer's motives/message Writer's intention and language use
  Punctuation  punctuation and pauses in a poem for effect Start to introduce poem 2 
  Structure/ Language Poem 2 Structure and Language, Plan and write assessment
  6 Summer 2 Creative Writing Gathering Ideas Show image and discuss initial ideas/word choices for effect
  Structuring their work/sentence structure structure of their work- show examples of other stories as a model
  Figurative Language Figurative language- improve their description in their writing.
  Variety of punctuation How to vary puncutation in their work
  writing  Writing their story/self-assessment. 
  Planning Planning Elements of fiction
  Fiction Writing their story/self-assessment. 
Year: 8 
  7 Autumn 1 I Am Malala Context Setting, time, social conditions, author
  Autumn 1  Character and plot characters and plot
  Autumn 1 Language use Language and ideas
  Writer's motives/message Writer's views
  Themes Use of themes
  Performance Performance aspect of the play
  Analysis Commenting on the text with evidence
  8 Autumn 2 Fantasy Writing Context Author and historical context
  Identify  Develop 'identify' skill
  Imagery Imagery in the text
  Theme Key themes and presentation in the text
  Explain Develop 'Explain' skill
  Mystery Semantic Field How is mystery presented?
  Evaluation Evaulation skills for assessment
  9 Spring 1 Protest Poetry Analysis/ gather ideas Read text 1 and annotate meaning
  Read text 2 and annotate meaning
  Comparision Compare theme in both texts/similarities and differences
  Form Features of form e.g. autobiography
  Planning Independent skills: Planning their own piece of writing
  Writing  What to include in their writing/SPAG/ Write Assessment 
  10 Spring 2 19th Century Literature Context Setting, time, social conditions, author
  Characters and theme characters and theme presentation
  Language use Language and ideas
  Writer's motives/message Writer's views
  Theme  Theme potrayal
  Comparision Compare 2 extracts for theme/character
  11 Summer 1 Shakespeare Devices Poetic devices/ SPLITT Acronym
  Structure How poem 1 is structured
  Writer's motives/message Writer's intention and language use
  Punctuation  punctuation and pauses in a poem for effect Start to introduce poem 2 
  Structure/ Language Poem 2 Structure and Language, Plan and write assessment
  Summer 2 Gathering Ideas Show image and discuss initial ideas/word choices for effect
  Structuring their work/sentence structure structure of their work- show examples of other stories as a model
  12 Creative Writing Figurative Language Figurative language- improve their description in their writing.
  Variety of punctuation How to vary puncutation in their work
  writing  Writing their story/self-assessment. 
  Planning Planning Elements of fiction
  Writing  Writing their story/self-assessment. 

Year 9

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Oliver Twist

  • Introduction to the Literature GCSE style text
  • Improve comprehension
  • Build an understanding of the Victorian era
  • Engage with social issues that we share with Dicken’s time
  • Develop understand of character, plot, and themes and a higher level than KS3

Relationship Poetry

  • Learn how to engage with poems of GCSE level
  • Analyse structure and language
  • Compare poems
  • Explore a range of ideas and historic eras

Term 2

King Lear or Twelfth Night

  • Learn about tragic/comedy plays.
  • Develop comprehension of Shakespearean English
  • Compare different character types used by Shakespeare
  • Learn about the performative aspects of the play

Crime Writing

  • Introduction to Language Paper style questions
  • Learn the conventions of the genre
  • Understand what makes good writing, including the language and structural techniques, grammar, punctuation and vocabulary needed for this
  • Use the language and structural techniques grammar, punctuation and vocabulary in their own writing

Term 3

Language

  • Develop comprehension of unseen fiction and non-fiction texts.
  • Analyse the use of language and structure
  • Evaluate fiction
  • Compare the writers’ perspectives
  • Create descriptive and persuasive writing

Speaking and Listening

  • Put the skills improved in the Language module into practice
  • Develop confidence to do public speaking in a formal setting
  • Learn how to structure a speech

 

Year 10

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Conflict Poetry

  • Develop language skills while studying literature texts.
  • Learn about a range of contexts from which the poems were created
  • Analyse structure
  • Improve comparative skills

An Inspector Calls

  • Develop language skills while studying literature texts.
  • Use understanding of the history and politics of 1900 to 1950
  • Learn about the conventions of a modern play

Term 2

Macbeth

  • Develop language skills while studying literature texts
  • Compare Shakespearean times with the Middle ages and contemporary Britain
  • Develop analysis of dense and sophisticated language
  • Learn about the purpose of creating this play
  • Consider how different actors and directors have approached the play

19th Century Novel

  • Develop a thorough understanding of either A Christmas Carol or Strange Case of Jekyll and Hyde
  • Develop language skills while studying literature texts.
  • Improve comprehension of 19th Century texts.
  • Apply understanding of Victorian England to better understand the texts.
  • Learn about the Gothic genre.

Term 3

Language

  • Develop comprehension of unseen fiction and non-fiction texts
  • Analyse the use of language and structure
  • Evaluate fiction
  • Compare the writers’ perspectives
  • Create descriptive and persuasive writing

Speaking and Listening

  • Put the skills improved in the Language module into practice
  • Develop confidence to do public speaking in a formal setting
  • Learn how to structure a speech
  • Complete Speaking and Listening component of their English Language GCSE.

 

Year 11

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Literature

  • Take the core content that they learn in Year 10, revise it and develop it further.
  • Learn how to plan and write an essay
  • Develop their ability to analyse literature
  • Use context to better understand the text
  • Analyse unseen poems

Term 2

Language

  • Develop comprehension of unseen fiction and non-fiction texts
  • Analyse the use of language and structure
  • Evaluate fiction
  • Compare the writers’ perspectives
  • Create descriptive and persuasive writing

Term 3

Revision

  • Focus on areas of weakness to ensure students have a complete understanding of what they need for the exams
  • Develop exam skills
  • Practise answering exam-style questions

 

Food Preparation and Nutrition

Year 9 - 10

 

Unit

Student Learning Outcomes

Term

1-2

 

Week 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

week 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 11-12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 13

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 14-15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • To demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the Eatwell guide guidelines and proportions.
  • To identify the main nutrients required for a healthy balanced diet.
  • To identify the main factors that affect dietary needs throughout different life stages.
  • To select a suitable starter or savoury light lunch dish to make that meets guideline of the Eatwell plate, nutritionally balanced and appealing to a teenager.

 

  • To cook and serve a healthy savoury lunch product for a teenager
  • To demonstrate the essential skills of preparing and cooking a simple soup, starter or lunch
  • To demonstrate and apply the principles of food safety and hygiene when cooking.
  • To demonstrate a good working routine in the food room.
  • To explain how the ingredients in their dish provide the necessary energy and nutrients to meet the dietary reference values (DRVs) for teenagers.

 

Students will learn the:

  • Definition of protein
  • Function of protein in the body
  • Main sources of protein in the diet
  • Effects of a deficiency or excess of protein in the diet
  • Amount of protein needed at different life stages

 

Students also learn:

  • To become familiar with ingredients and cuisine from another country.
  • To recognise that a variety of food is needed in our diets because different foods provide different nutrients for good health and a balanced diet.
  • To describe and explain the importance of energy balance, physical activity and the implications of dietary excess/deficiency, eg malnutrition, maintenance of a healthy weight.
  • To describe and explain the importance of good food safety and hygiene when preparing and cooking high risk ingredients such as chicken.
  • To identify the main health issues related to diet.

 

  • To prepare, cook and serve a healthy fajita or tortilla wrap that contains protein, carbohydrate and at least 2-3 portions of your 5 a day.
  • To demonstrate the essential knife skills of preparing and cooking both meat and vegetables safely and hygienically.
  • To demonstrate an awareness of taste, texture and smell to decide how to season dishes and combine ingredients.
  • To demonstrate safe and hygienic working practices in the food room following teacher instructions and given recipes.

 

Students will learn:

  • The definition of carbohydrates in the diet
  • The main sources of carbohydrate.
  • The effects of deficiency and excess of carbohydrate in diet.
  • The amount of carbohydrate needed for everyday life.
  • The importance of reducing the amount of free sugars in our diets today.

 

 

Students will learn:

  • The definition of dietary fibre
  • The functions of dietary fibre
  • The different types of dietary fibre
  • The effect of excess and deficiency of dietary reference values for fibre
  • How to modify an existing recipe to reduce the amount of free sugar in the recipe and/or increase the amount of dietary fibre in the recipe.
  • Carbohydrates Lesson in increased dietary fibre and reduced sugar practical.

 

Students will learn:

  • To prepare, cook and serve muffin, tray bake or cake that has been adapted to reduce the sugar and increase the fibre.
  • To showcase a range of technical skills when preparing and cooking a suitable dish.
  • To demonstrate and apply the principles of food safety and hygiene when cooking.
  • To demonstrate a good working routine in the food room.
  • To develop skills in garnishing, finishing and presentation of dishes.
  • To analyse the sugar and fibre content of the dish and explain how it has been reduced.

 

Fats- Students will learn:

  • The definition of Fat.
  • The definition of fat in the diet.
  • The main sources of fat in the diet
  • The effects of deficiency and excess of fat in diet.
  • The amount of fat needed for everyday life.
  • The importance of reducing the amount of saturated fat in our diets today.
  • The ingredients and methods to prepare and cook a savoury flan or quiche with a short crust pastry base.
  • The ability of fat to shorten foods such as pastries.

 

Students will learn:

  • The definition of shortening and understand the effect of using different fats to shorten pastry.
  • Write hypothesis or prediction about what type of fat is best for short crust pastry.
  • Investigate what is the best type of fat for pastry making.
  • Work in groups to prepare and make up short crust pastry using different types and ratios of fat: flour
  • Investigate 6 different types of fat used in pastry making and the ratios of each.
  • To develop and practice investigation skills similar to those used later in NEA.
  • To develop sensory analysis techniques when investigating foods.
  • To develop analysis and evaluation skills when working with different fats.

 

Students will learn:

  • To prepare, cook and serve a savoury quiche or flan that has been adapted to reduce the saturated fat content.
  • To showcase a range technical skills when preparing and cooking a suitable savoury dish.
  • To demonstrate and apply the principles of food safety and hygiene when cooking.
  • To demonstrate a good working routine in the food room.
  • To develop skills in garnishing, finishing and presentation of dishes.
  • To identify nutritional profile and science behind the recipe.

 

Students will learn:

  • Vitamin A, D, E & K
  • The functions of vitamins in the body
  • The main sources of vitamins in the body
  • The effect of excess and deficiency of vitamins in the diet.
  • The dietary reference values for the different vitamins needed every day.

 

Students will learn:

  • To prepare, cook and serve soup, salad or starter that is rich in specified Vitamin and suitable for preparing cooking and serving in 1 hour.
  • To showcase a range of technical skills when preparing and cooking a suitable vitamin rich dish.
  • To demonstrate and apply the principles of food safety and hygiene when cooking.
  • To demonstrate a good working routine in the food room.
  • To develop skills in garnishing, finishing and presentation of dishes.
  • To manage time successfully and present dish with fact file for assessment in 1 hour.
  • Why the preparation and cooking of foods has an effect on vitamin content.

 

  • Students will learn about the minerals calcium, iron, salt and flouride.
  • The functions of each mineral in the body.
  • The main sources of minerals in the body.
  • The effect of excess and deficiency of different minerals in the diet.
  • The dietary reference values for the different minerals needed every day.
  • To identify the main ingredients in moussaka, pasta bake or similar style pasta dish.
  • To understand the scientific principles of how starch thickens a sauce by gelatinisation.
  • To analyse the nutritional value of the meal and in particular the mineral content of the dish.

 

 

 

Term

3-4

 

Week 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 2-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 10-11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • To prepare, cook and serve main meal that is rich in calcium and vitamin D
  • To showcase a range of technical skills when preparing and cooking a suitable calcium rich dish. (S1,S2,S3,S4,S5,S6,S7,S8 and S10)
  • To demonstrate and apply the principles of food safety and hygiene when cooking.
  • To demonstrate a good working routine in the food room.
  • To develop skills in garnishing, finishing and presentation of dishes.
  • To manage time successfully and present dish for assessment.
  • To serve the dish with a suitable salad or vegetable accompaniment which is rich in iron

 

Students will learn:

  • The importance of good preparation and revision in advance of end of topic assessment.
  • To practice answering different types of exam questions under examination conditions.
  • To develop exam technique when answering different types of questions
  • To test knowledge and understanding of nutrition and the different nutrients in food.
  • To develop research skills and apply knowledge of healthy eating and nutrition into practical activities.

 

Students will learn:

  • To develop research skills
  • To develop planning skills to include details of timings, instructions for making and include important hygiene or safety points.
  • To analyse the nutritional value of the meal.
  • To calculate the total costs of the dish, how many it will serve and portion size.
  • To produce a time plan for making.

 

Students will learn:

  • To prepare and cook a nutritionally balanced savoury main course dish which meets the advice of the Eatwell Guide.
  • To apply a variety of technical skills and make some creative and quality products with skill and precision.
  • To demonstrate and apply the principles of food safety and hygiene when cooking.
  • To present a dish with a good level of technical skill and is presented with a suitable level of finish and decoration for serving.
  • To carry out sensory analysis with family using a rating test.

 

Students will learn:

  • To prepare and cook an accompaniment that provides a valuable source of one of the antioxidant vitamins A,C and E.
  • To apply a variety of technical skills and make some creative and quality products with skill and precision.
  • To demonstrate and apply the principles of food safety and hygiene when cooking.
  • To present a dish with a good level of technical skill and is presented with a suitable level of finish and decoration for serving.
  • To carry out sensory analysis with family using profiling test.

 

Students will learn:

  • How to record the results of sensory testing in a rating or profiling chart?
  • To analyse the results of sensory testing and write detailed conclusions on the results
  • To calculate costs of dish (es) and evaluate how cost effective and value for money the dish is for family.
  • To analyse the nutritional profile of the dish and suggest modifications for improvement.
  • To evaluate work.

 

Students will learn:

  • The importance of consuming the right diet at different life stages

To include:

  • The dietary needs of pre-school children.
  • The dietary needs of school children aged 5-12.
  • The dietary needs of teenagers.
  • The dietary needs of adults.
  • The dietary needs of the elderly.
  • To develop mind mapping and revision techniques to revise dietary needs of different life stages.

 

Students will learn:

  • To prepare and cook recipe which meets the dietary needs of a chosen life stage.
  • To apply a variety of technical skills and make some creative and quality products with skill and precision
  • To demonstrate and apply the principles of food safety and hygiene when cooking.
  • To present a dish with a good level of technical level of technical skill and is presented with a suitable level of finish and decoration for serving.
  • To carry out sensory analysis with family using profiling test.

 

Students will learn the importance of adapting recipes to meet a range of special dietary needs:

  • Vegetarian and vegans
  • Coeliac
  • Lactose intolerant
  • High fibre
  • Reduced fat

Students will learn:

  • How to adapt a recipe for a layered dessert and make it suitable for a range of different dietary needs.
  • To produce an informative recipe card for chosen layered and chilled dessert.

 

Students will learn:

  • To adapt a given recipe for a layered dessert to make it suitable for chosen dietary need.
  • To apply a variety of technical skills and make some creative and quality products with skill and precision.
  • To demonstrate and apply the principles of food safety and hygiene when cooking
  • To present a dish with a good level of technical skill and is presented with a suitable level of finish and decoration for serving.
  • To carry out sensory analysis with family using profiling test

 

Students will learn:

  • Why the body needs energy
  • How energy is measured
  • The basal metabolic rate (BMR) is and how it is measured
  • What physical activity level is
  • How BMR and PAL work together to determine how much energy in Kilocalories is needed every day.
  • The recommended percentage of energy required by different nutrients
  • The effects of a deficiency or excess of energy in the body.

Term

5-6

 

Week 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 12

 

 

 

 

 

Week 13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 14

 

 

 

 

 

Students will learn:

  • To prepare, cook and serve main meal that a good source of energy.
  • To showcase a range of technical skills when preparing and cooking a suitable calcium rich dish.
  • To demonstrate a good working routine in the food room.
  • To develop skills in garnishing, finishing and presentation of dishes.
  • To manage time successfully and present dish for assessment.
  • To serve the dish with a suitable salad or vegetable accompaniment which is rich in iron.

 

Students will learn the relationship between diet, nutrition and health.

The major diet related diseases, what causes them and how to prevent them including:

  • Obesity
  • Cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease and high blood pressure)
  • Bone health including rickets and osteoporosis
  • Dental health
  • Iron deficiency anaemia
  • Type 2 diabetes.
  • To work as a team and plan a suitable menu for specific dietary illness or health condition.
  • To negotiate which student is going to make which course and dish from their chosen menu.

 

Students will learn:

  • To prepare, cook and serve main meal that a good source of energy.
  • To showcase a range of technical skills when preparing and cooking a suitable calcium rich dish.
  • To demonstrate and apply the principles of food safety and hygiene when cooking
  • To demonstrate a good working routine in the food room
  • To develop skills in garnishing, finishing and presentation of dishes
  • To manage time successfully and present dish for assessment
  • To serve both dishes as a complete meal with a suitable salad or vegetable accompaniment if appropriate

 

Students will learn:

  • To practice answering different types of exam questions under examination conditions.
  • To test knowledge and understanding of nutrition and the different nutrients in food.
  • Peer assessment techniques when assessing Mark papers.

 

Students will learn:

  • The reasons why food is cooked
  • The different ways that heat can be transferred
  • Write a hypothesis or prediction about what way of cooking vegetable to retain freshness and nutritional values.
  • To work in groups to use different methods of cooking a vegetable.
  • To develop and practice investigation skills similar to those used later in NEA
  • To develop sensory analysis techniques when investigating foods
  • To develop analysis and evaluation skills when working to investigate the best cooking time methods for vegetables.

 

Students will learn:

  • To prepare, cook and present kebabs with a range of vegetable and carbohydrate accompaniments that demonstrate 2-3 different methods of heat transfer.
  • To showcase a range of technical skills when preparing and cooking a suitable calcium rich dish.
  • To demonstrate and apply the principles of food safety and hygiene when cooking.
  • To demonstrate a good working routine in the food room.
  • To develop skills in garnishing, finishing and presentation of dishes.
  • To manage time successfully and present dish for assessment.
  • To serve kebabs as a complete meal with a suitable salad or vegetable accompaniment if appropriate.

 

 

 

Students will learn:

The meanings of the following terms:

  • Protein denaturation
  • Protein coagulation
  • Foam formation

 

  • Apply scientific knowledge of these terms to recipes they have already made the course including marinating, pasta making, bread making and whisking meringues.
  • Gluten formation.

 

Students will learn:

  • The scientific principles underlying the role of protein and the formation of gluten when making a bread dough.
  • To identify the ingredients required to make bread, their functions and the essential stages of production processes and stages when making bread and bread products.
  • To prepare, cook and a bread based product which applies the scientific principles using the protein gluten to bind the dough and give elasticity.
  • To understand the function of yeast as a raising agent in bread making.
  • To showcase a range of technical skills when preparing and cooking bread based rolls or pizza (S1,S2,S3,S4,S5 and S8, S10 and S11)
  • To demonstrate and apply the principles of food safety and hygiene when cooking
  • To demonstrate a good working routine in the food room.
  • To develop skills in garnishing, finishing and presentation of dishes.
  • To manage time successfully and present dish for assessment.
  • To suggest ways of adapting the dough recipe to make it suitable for coeliac diets.

 

Students will learn:

  • The scientific principles underlying the use of fats and oils to demonstrate the following:
  1. Shortening eg pastry making
  2. Aeration eg making a cake
  3. Plasticity eg pastry making
  4. Emulsification eg salad dressings or mayonnaise
  5.  

Fruit and vegetables

  1. Enzyme browning of fresh fruit.

Oxidation and preventing vitamin loss when preparing and cooking vegetables

 

Students will learn about:

The scientific principles underlying the use of 4 different types of raising agents used in food today:

  • Chemical
  • Mechanical
  • Steam
  • Biological

 

 

 

Students will learn:

  • To apply knowledge and understanding of using different raising agents to food.
  • To showcase a range of technical skills when preparing and cooking dishes with raising agents added (S1,S2,S3,S4,/s5 and S11)
  • To demonstrate and apply the principles of food safety and hygiene when cooking.
  • To demonstrate a good working routine in the food room.
  • To develop skills in garnishing, finishing and presentation of dishes.
  • To manage time successfully and present dish for assessment.

 

Students will learn:

  • What is meant by the term micro-organisms.
  • Which micro-organisms cause food to spoil and make it unsafe to eat.
  • Conditions for growth of micro-organisms in order to grow and multiply.
  • What enzymes are and how they spoil the palatability of foods.

 

Students will learn about:

  • Food poisoning
  • The bacteria that cause food poisoning
  • How bacteria grow and multiply
  • Temperature control to reduce or prevent bacteria multiplying.

The use of micro-organisms in the production of:

  1. Cheddar cheese
  2. Bread
  3. Yoghurt

 

Students will learn:

  • To prepare, cook and serve a traditionally British soup which uses locally sourced vegetables and celebrates the best of British cuisine.
  • To showcase a range of technical skills when preparing and cooking suitable
  • To demonstrate and apply the principles of food safety and hygiene when cooking.
  • To demonstrate a good working routine in the food room.
  • To explain how the soup makes the best use of locally sourced ingredients.
  • To taste and evaluate the sensory qualities of the soup.
  • To discuss what went well and even better if.

 

Factors that influence what we eat today.

  • Food availability and seasonality
  • Cultural and religious influences
  • Ethical and moral influences
  • Environmental influences.
  • The media

 

 

Students will learn:

  • To explain how the meal makes the best use of fresh locally sourced ingredients.
  • To identify the environmental impact of some of our food choices.
  • To taste and evaluate the sensory qualities of the main meal they had at home and explain to the whole class.
  • To discuss what went well and even better if.

 

Students will learn:

  • To develop research skills and carry out research into the cuisine of another country.
  • About the ingredients and food products from different international countries.
  • About the distinctive features of chosen cuisine including ingredients, equipment, cooking techniques, eating patterns and presentation styles.
  • To gather research from a variety of different primary and secondary sources.
  • To present research findings in a concise and relevant way.

 

 

Year 11

 

Unit

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Week 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 2-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 4-5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 8 -19

  • Understand the requirements of the food investigation task including: Research, plan and carry out and investigation into the working characteristics, functional and chemical properties of ingredients
  • Record the investigation findings
  • Analyse and evaluate results
  • Present the food investigation task.

 

The Food investigation section A-C

  • Research, plan and carry out an investigation into the working characteristics, functional and chemical properties of ingredients.
  • Develop research skills to gather and use primary and secondary sources of information.
  • Develop analysis and evaluation skills and explain how findings will influence practical investigations.

 

 

  • Carry out a range of practical investigations into the working characteristics functional and chemical properties of ingredients as identified in research findings.
  • Identify essential controls when carrying out a food investigation.
  • Record results from investigation using charts, graph, tables, sensory, testing and annotated photographs.
  • Explain how results of each investigation should be used to form the next stage of investigation with reasoning.

 

  • Analyse and interpret the results of investigative work.
  • Link the results to research explaining the working characteristics, functional and chemical properties of ingredients tested.
  • Write a conclusion to the hypothesis/prediction with reasons and justifications.
  • Explain how results can be applied into practical food preparation and cooking.

 

  • Understand the requirements of the food preparation task including:
  • Analyse a task and carry out research on a life stage/dietary group or culinary tradition.
  • Demonstrate a range of technical skills
  • Plan a final menu for chosen life stage/dietary group or culinary tradition
  • Prepare, cook and serve three dishes in a three hour session
  • Analyse and evaluate final menu.

 

  • Plan and carry out research into chosen life stage, dietary group or culinary tradition.
  • Develop research skills to gather and use primary and secondary sources of information.
  • Develop analysis and evaluation skills and explain how findings will influence practical investigations.
  • Present research in a concise and effectively communicated portfolio of work.
  • Plan relevant and appropriate practical activities.

 

Food preparation section B

  • Select a range of three or four suitable dishes to trial further.
  • Justify choices and explain suitability, creativity and technical skills.
  • Record evidence of the choice of dishes made during the technical skills demonstration.

 

  • Understand the assessment criteria for the technical demonstration
  • Make a range of suitable dishes showcasing technical skills, creativity and practice making skills
  • Demonstrate a good understanding of ingredients and making processes
  • Work with confidence, independence and accuracy.
  • Work safely and hygienically at all times.
  • Present dishes with a good level of technical skill and with a suitable level of finish and decoration for serving.
  • Carry out sensory analysis of all the dishes to determine final choice of menu.
  • Evaluate and determine the final menu dishes.

 

 

Term

2-3

Week 20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 25 - 26

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 27 -29

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 30 - 45

food preparation task, section C

  • Select suitable final dishes to make for the three-hour making session
  • Produce a three-hour time plan that includes food safety
  • Justify reasons for choice of final dishes and menu with reference to skills, ingredients, nutrition, cooking methods, costs, provenance, sensory properties and portion size.

 

  • Prepare, cook and serve three final dishes in one three-hour making session demonstrating some complexity and challenge
  • Execute a range of technical skills with confidence, precision and accuracy.
  • Select and use appropriate equipment accurately.
  • Demonstrate a range of appropriate finishing techniques and presentation techniques.
  • Demonstrate evidence of effective organisational skills and time management.
  • Produce all three dishes successfully within the three-hour period following the time plan.
  • Correctly sequence all making activities with effective dovetailing of tasks.
  • Work independently demonstrating good personal hygiene application of food safety.

 

  • Carry out sensory testing of the final dishes.
  • Carry out nutritional analysis of final dish.
  • Compare nutritional profile of dish against Dietary Reference Values for target group.
  • Cost the final dishes,
  • Evaluate the success of the dishes and identify improvements.

 

Revision and mock examinations

  • Allow one or two weeks to prepare students for mock exams.  There is flexibility to build preparation and the mock exam into this scheme of work at a convenient time for schools.
  • Prepare a revision program after auditing what areas of specification have already been covered effectively in Year 10 and prioritise any topics not covered by students which need revising.
  • The following should be covered in this period:
  • How the written is organised
  • How to prepare for the written exam
  • The command words used in written exam
  • The types of question that will be asked in a written exam including
  • Data response
  • Structured question
  • Open-ended response questions or free response questions

 

 

 

 

French

The MFL Faculty strives to prepare students for a globalised world where the importance and relevance of foreign language learning has never been greater, given the wider opportunities for contacts abroad both at work and in leisure time.

Learning a language maximises opportunities for future employment in the UK, and offers a stimulating intellectual experience and a challenge which is worthwhile in itself. It also supports English literacy acquisition.

We believe that gaining insight into other cultures leads to greater tolerance and contributes to breaking barriers of racism and xenophobia.

During Years 7-8, students will have the opportunity to develop their language skills in listening, reading, speaking and writing in the target language. Whenever possible and appropriate, we use authentic material to support teaching and learning.

Weekly homework is a crucial part of learning and ensures students consolidate grammar concepts and vocabulary.

Unit Term Topic Theme Lesson Content
Year: 7 
  1 Autumn 1 Key French sounds + quiz Relationship between letter and sound French sounds and intonation
  Key French sounds + numbers 1-21
  Brothers+sisters+age using AVOIR talking about brothers, sisters , age
  classroom Indefinite / definite article describing a classroom
  Assessment week and DIT    
  2 likes and dislikes verb AIMER and definite article Talking about likes and dislikes
  describing yourself and others adjective agreement/ etre describing yourself and others
  Autumn 2 Saying what you do infinitives and reg -er verbs  Saying what you do
  Giving/understanding dates dates an interview about yourself
  colours + time Masculine & feminine/ prepo pic description + poem
  school subjects and opinions er verbs which subjects you like and why
  Consolidation- Reading strategies    
  Assessment week and DIT
  3 school uniform Adjectives after nouns Talking about what you wear in school
  Spring 1 A school day using new -er verbs ( je-ils) school routine
  A typical French school reading and listening for gist understanding keys facts about French schools
  what there is/isn't combien de / d' describing my school
  Agreeing/disagreeing questions writing a description 
  Consolidation by skill avoir/etre/er verbs/adjectives  
  Assessment week and DIT Opinion verbs and present tense Describing school day and the subjects you like
  4 Spring 2 Weather + seasons KEY French sounds Talking about weather + seasons
  sports Jouer a  je-ils /neg which sports you play/don'tplay
  Activities you do Faire / faire de /est-ce que / qu'est-ce que Free time activities
  what you like doing verb + infinitive Free time verbs and opinions
  an interview with a celebrity forming/answering questions creating an interview
  Consolidation- speaking skills Present tense of irregular verbs, future tense, op Free time
  Summer 1 Assessment week and DIT Present tense, Opinions verbs & infinitives
  5 Taking about animals/ using higher numbers irregular plural / higher numbers Counting 
  Describing your family using possessives My and Your Describing others
  Describing where you live nous form of -er verbs Describing where you live
  Talking about breakfast using the partitive article What do you eat/drink for breakfast
  Summer 2 Bastille Day Using the glossary Learning about a popular celebration
  Consolidation- Reading strategies see above Descriptions
  Assessment week and DIT Descriptions, present tense.
  6 Autumn 1  using NOUS ( present tense) Verbs and verb endings Holidays
  Autumn 1 Getting ready to go out Reflexive verbs ( regular)
  Using higher numbers prices in euros Buying drinks and snacks
  Talking about holidays plans Using the near future tense Holiday activities
  Assessment week 1 Present tense,  near future tense
  DIT with grammar codes Present tense and near future.
  7 Autumn 2 Your dreams for the future Je voudrais + infinitive Plans for the future
  Spare time activities present tense -er verbs TV programmes
  Consolidation  week 3 tenses  
  Assessment week 2 Using the future and present tenses together Holidays
  8 Spare time activities avoir + etre present tense films and cinema
  ir and re verbs Reading books
  spare time activities 3 tenses spare time activities
  Spring 1 Spare time activities aller + faire the internet
  spare time activities The perfect tense Last night activities
  a trip to Paris The perfect tense ( reg. verbs) Activities in Paris
  Consolidation week The perfect tense Visiting Paris
  Assessment week 3 The perfect tense/ Je and on/nous Activities in Paris
  Assessment DIT
  9 Spring 2 when you did things perfect tense of irregular verbs
  understanding information c'etait… J'ai trouve.. + adj
  Where you went and how perfect tense with etre
  Interviewing a suspect asking questions in the perfect tense
  Talking about personality adjectival agreement Identity
  Consolidation Using 3 tenses Spare time activities + holidays
  Summer 1 Assessment 4
  DIT with grammar codes
  10 Talking about relationships Reflexive verbs  identity
  Open book assessment present, past + future Identity
  DIT with grammar codes Using the future, present and preterite tenses to  identity
  Summer 2 Talking about music agreeing, disagreeing, reasons Identity
  Talking about clothes the near future tense
  Talking about your passion past, present, future
  Where you live comparative adjectives My house
  consolidation past, present, future Identity
  Assessment 6
  DIT with grammar codes

Year 9

French

GCSE

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

THEME Identity and culture

Module 1

  • Describing family and friends
  • Revising places in town and activities

 

  • Writing about friendship
  • Using irregular verbs in the present tense.
  • Talking about family relationships
  • Using reflexive verbs in the present tense
  • Planning to go out
  • Describing a night out with friends
  • Being able to say/write  what I did.

Term 2

Module 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Module 2

  • Writing about your childhood using the imperfect tense.
  • Discussing role models
  • Analysing when to use perfect or imperfect tense.
  • Understanding the description of a best friend.
  • Translating sentences with a variety of tenses and vocabulary.

 

 

 

 

  • Evaluating the sport and music vocabulary I remember.
  • Revising technology films and TV

 

  • Explaining which sports I like/dislike

 

  • Using depuis + present tense to say how long I have been doing something.

 

  • Comparing on line activities

 

Term 3

 Module 2

  • Understanding people’s reading habits
  • Comparing present and past reading habits.
  • Describing favourite television programmes.
  • Using direct object pronouns ( le, la,les)
  • Talking about actors and films
  • Using superlatives adjectives. ( the best…)

 

Year 10

French

GCSE

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

THEME Identity and culture

Module 3

  • Talking about food and meals
  • Discussing shopping for clothes

 

  • Describing your daily life

 

  • Expressing what you can /must do

 

  • Talking about food for special occasions

 

  • Using the pronoun “en”

 

  • Differentiating formal / informal language

 

  • Asking questions in the TU and VOUS forms.

 

  • Describing family celebrations

 

  • Telling how to say you have just done something ( venir de + infinitive)

 

  • Describing festival and traditions in France.

 

  • Understanding and using a combination of tenses.

Term 2

Module 4

Local area, holiday and travel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Evaluating how much I can say about where I live, the weather and transport in my area.
  • Describing a typical town and asking the way.
  • Learning about a French region and describing it.
  • Understanding how to use the pronoun”Y”
  • Analysing the pros and cons of your area.
  • Becoming confident at using negative forms.
  • Choosing what to see and do when visiting a city.
  • Translating “which ?”
  • Planning an activity according to the weather.
  • Using the future tense effectively.

 

 

 

Term 3

 Module 5

THEME

Local area, holiday and travel.

  • Brainstorming holiday activities.

 

  • Talking about past/present/future holidays.

 

 

  • Writing creatively about an ideal holiday.

 

  • Using the conditional tense.

 

 

  • Booking and reviewing hotels

 

  • Using reflexive verbs in the perfect tense.

 

 

  • Ordering food and drinks in a restaurant.
  • Using EN + past participle
  • Exploring means of transport
  • Using avant de + infinitive
  • Buying  souvenirs
  • Understanding and using ce/cette/ces
  • Describing a holiday that went wrong.
  • Using the pluperfect tense.

 

Year 11

French

GCSE

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

THEME

Module 6

School

 

  • Brainstorming school subjects.
  • Describing your school.
  • Comparing French /UK school systems.
  • Discussing school rules
  • Using il faut/il est interdit de
  • Analysing what is best about school
  • Talking about a school exchange
  • Using past, present and future time frames.

Term 2

THEME

Module 7

Future aspirations, study and work

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Discussing jobs and work preferences, career choices.
  • Translating better/worse , the best/the worst.
  • Planning for the future
  • Understanding the subjunctive
  • Analysing why languages are important.
  • Using adverbs.
  • Applying for jobs
  • Reading case studies (tourism)
  • Using verbs followed by a or de

Term 3

THEME

International and global dimension

  • Evaluating problems facing the world
  • Making connections between word types.
  • Listing suggestions to protect the environment.
  • Using On pourrait…on devrait…
  • Discussing ethical shopping
  • Using the passive
  • Exploring the world of volunteering.
  • Discussing big events
  • Giving arguments for and against.

 

 

Geography

Geography

Geography provokes and answers questions about the natural and human worlds, using different scales of enquiry to view them from different perspectives. It develops knowledge of places and environments throughout the world, an understanding of maps, and a range of investigative and problem solving skills both inside and outside the classroom. Geography explains the past, illuminates the present and prepares us for the future. What can be more important than that?

Year 7 – Exploring the British Isles, Epic Ecosystems, Map Skills, Exploring Brazil, Wild Weather and Tourism.

Year 8 – Plate tectonics, Population and Development, The Age of Stupid, Into Africa and UK Geography and Geographical Skills

Unit Term Topic Theme Lesson Content
Year: 7 
  1 Autumn 1 What is Geography? Introduction to Geography  The three types of Geography definitions and examples.  Picture sorting activity.  
  Exploring the British Isles Where are we? Plotting the BI on a World Map, labelling the seven continents. Labelling three maps to understand the differences between the British Isles, United Kingdom and Great Britain.  
  Mapping the British Isles  Political and Physical Maps of the British Isles mapping activities using the Atlases.  
  Rural and Urban Britain  Defining rural and urban.  T Table identifying the key characteristics and differences between these areas.  Extended writing activity 'I would rather live in an urban/rural areas'
  What is Britishness? Explanation of perception using famous images.  
  Changing society, changing economy.  Migration in the United Kingdom. 
  2 Autumn 2 Epic Ecosystems Biomes and ecosystems of the World Annotating/labelling of ecosystem, key word match up.   Drawing diagram of a food chain.  Table of the differences between biomes and ecosytems.  World map locating four main ecosystems. Climate graph analysis. 
  The Tropical Rainforest  Layers of the rainforest diagram.  Key word match up and Amazon Rainforest case study.  Plant and animal adaptation A3 worksheet. 
  Threats to the Rainforest  Photograph analysis.  Stakeholder matching task. Card sort activity and extended writing 'Who destroyed the rainforest?'
  The Hot Desert  Definition of deserts and key word match up.  Sahara Desert case study.  Desertification explanation and comprehension activity based on the Bedouins. 
  Coniferous Forests Locate taiga, coniferous or boreal. Analyse climate and adaptations. Utilise bipolar surveys to assess human impacts on coniferous forest ecosystems.  
  3 Spring 1 Map Skills Introduction to Map Skills The key features of every map and the similarities and differences between  6 types of maps. Complete table using powerpoint slides. 
  Grid References Four and Six Figure grid references.  Use powerpoint to explain how we find grid references.  Worksheets containing activities to be completed. 
  Measuring height on a map Learn the difference between contour lines, spot heights and layer shading.  Complete worksheet and questions.  
  What is Scale? Measuring distance on a map.  Measuring distance and using symbols to create a story. 
  OS Map Skills and Symbols OS Map of London Quiz. 
  4 Spring 2 Weather Introduction to Weather  Weather and climate and the importance of this for different stakeholders. 
  The UK and World Climate  Factors affecting climate in the UK analysis and extended writing.  Comparing world climates - climate graphs. 
  Preciptation The water cycle and three types of rainfall. 
  Tropical Storms (Hurricanes, cyclones and typhoons Causes and effects of tropical storms with extended writing task. 
  Comparing Case Studies  Typhoon Haiyan and Hurricane Katrina.  Mystery activities?
  5 Summer 1 Brazil Introduction to Brazil Locate Brazil on a world map, examine the key features of Brazil and compare differences in how Brazil is portrayed. 
  Population of Brazil  Analyse choropleth maps to explain popoulation distribution.  Evaluative writing task discussing problems with living in cities. 
  Favelas  Comprehension carousel task and letter writing skills.   
  Inequality in Brazil  Income and gender inequalities. Comparative writing task. 
  Resources and Sustainability  Brazil's improving economy and creating a sustainable furture of Curitiba.  Analysis of scenarios. 
  Global Brazil  Exploring a cultural melting pot through letter writing skills. Categorising impacts according to social enviornmental or economic.
  6 Summer 2 Tourism The Importance of Tourism  Ranking importance of tourism and reasons behind it. 
  Who are tourists and why is paradise lost? Investigating the tourist and who are the new tourists. Assessing the positive and negatives of tourism. Considering alternative tourism such as sustainable tourism. 
  Should tourists be allowed everywhere? Investigating economic, social and environmental impacts of tourism with specific case studies. Categorising impacts as positive, negative, EN, EC or S. 
  Tourism in Africa Locating case studies. Assessing impacts in current and historical contexts. 
  Comparing Case Studies  Locating Blackpool. Using a living graph to show affect of tourism on Blackpool. Introducing the Butler model to explain theory of development and analyse patterns. 
  Ecotourism  Locating national parks in the UK. Identifying impacts of tourism on a local scale. Assessing how tourism can be changed to eco tourism through independent learning task.
Year: 8 
  1 Autumn 1 Plate Tectonics The Structure of the Earth and Convection Currents Pop up layers of the earth diagram,  jounrney to the centre of the earth,  convection currents worksheet. 
  Plate Boundaries  Map analysis and map activity. Plate boundaries worksheet, key word match up and true or false activity.  PEQ 10 minutes. 
  Causes and Impacts of Earthquakes  Diamond 9 activity of the effects of earthquakes. 
  Haiti Earthquake Case Study  Why did Emmanuel die?  Mystery card sort activity and worksheet.  PEQ Explain the effects of the Haiti Earthquake.  Haiti Earthquake documentary https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EEgA2zSz8rw
  Managing Earthquakes and Japan Case Study  Video notes from a selection of clips about building design.  Annotate earthquake proof building with EQ proof features.  Kobe mystery.   Extended writing; letter to the Haiti government. 
  2 Autumn 2 Age of Stupid Natural Resources Totally stupid worksheet. Geog.3. 4th Edition questions and answers.  PEQ on energy resources.
  Is Oil Stupid  Cartoon analysis, Geog.3 handout, the resource curse videos and extended writing
  Global Warming Fact or Fiction Cartoon timeline, global temperature change graph, the natural and enhanced greenhouse effect.
  Impacts of a warmer Earth Geog.2 4th addition, impacts of climate change comprehension table activity. Questions for Geog.2. Tweet.
  Can we be less stupid? How is electricity made? Renewable energy top trumps. Ideas for the future. Extended writing ‘What is the best option for the future?’
  3 Spring 1 Globalisation and Development Population Introduction  Snapper Island numeracy task.  World population graph analysis. Key term match up.   Population pyramid analysis. 
  Population Impacts Two minute presentation planning.  
  Population Policies  One Child Policy video clips and card sort.  Positives and negatives of OCP.  Writing task.  Singapore Comprehension activity. 
  What is Development? Development indicators, diamond 9 ranking activity,  comparing countries ranking activity, Brandt line, extended writing 'Why are developing countries poor?'
  Development in Malawi and Singapore Define globalisation and TNCS, global brands identification, Nike Case Study, Winners and Losers of globalisation worksheet and Behind the swoosh documentary.  Extended writing task. 
  Globalisation and TNCs
  Putting an end to poverty  A3 worksheets on Wateraid, Single and Conservation farming,  Intermediate technology and Fairtrade. Videos and information to help complete. 
  4 Spring 2 Coastal Landscapes Coastal Erosion Coasts mind map, Hard and Soft coasts, coastal erosion diagrams, PEQ.
  Wave Types and Landforms of Coastal Erosion  Gap fill, 4 mark PEQ, CCASS diagram, 6 mark PEQ. 
  Longshore Drift and Depositional Landforms Gap fill, PEQ 3 marks, landform explanations. 
  Holderness Case Study  Note taking using diagrams and maps, consolidation of notes, 6 mark PEQ, Mid Term Essay writing a letter to persuade.
  Coastal Management  Coastal management worksheet, extended writing, mid-term essay.
  5 Summer 1 Urbanisation Changes in where we live  
  6 River Landscapes The Drainage Basin and Long Profile of  a River  Water cycle explanation and word fill. Drainage basin annotation and gap fill.  Long profile of a river.  Quick answer questions ‘Plenary’.
  Rivers at Works and Landforms of the Upper Course  Drainage basin diagram and crossword recap.  Explanation of erosion, transportation and deposition.  Key word Bingo. PEQ. Mini plenary quick fire round.  Waterfalls, V-Shaped Valleys and Interlocking spurs explanation and worksheets. PEQ. 
  Middle and Lower Course Landforms   
  River Flooding 
  River Management 
  Summer 2 UK Landscapes UK's Physical Landscape 
  UK's Changing Economy
  Demographic Change
  Regeneration Decision making activity.  Extended writing task. 

Year 9 (2020 onwards)

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Introduction to Geographical enquiry

 

Hazardous Earth: Tectonics

Explore the fundamental elements of geographical enquiry

 

 

Understand the causes and impacts of tectonic activity and how management of tectonic hazards varies with location

 

 

Term 2

Hazardous Earth: Climate

 

 

Development Dynamics

Understand the function, change and characteristics of the world’s climate system, including the hazards it creates

 

Understand the scale of global inequality and how it can be reduced

 

Employ a case study characterising how emerging countries manage to develop

 

Term 3

Challenges of an urbanising world

Understand the causes and challenges of rapid urban change

 

Employ a case study signifying why quality of life varies within one megacity in an emerging country

 

 

Year 9 (2019-2020)

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Hazardous Earth: Tectonics

 

 

 

Hazardous Earth: Climate

Understand the causes and impacts of tectonic activity and how management of tectonic hazards varies with location

 

 

Understand the function, change and characteristics of the world’s climate system, including the hazards it creates

 

 

Term 2

Development Dynamics

 

Understand the scale of global inequality and how it can be reduced

 

Employ a case study characterising how emerging countries manage to develop

Term 3

Challenges of an urbanising world

Understand the causes and challenges of rapid urban change

 

Employ a case study signifying why quality of life varies within one megacity in an emerging country

 

 

Year 10

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Hazardous Earth: Tectonics

 

 

 

Hazardous Earth: Climate

Understand the causes and impacts of tectonic activity and how management of tectonic hazards varies with location

 

 

Understand the function, change and characteristics of the world’s climate system, including the hazards it creates

 

 

Term 2

Development Dynamics

 

 

 

 

 

Challenges of an urbanising world

Understand the scale of global inequality and how it can be reduced

 

Employ a case study (India) characterising how emerging countries manage to develop

 

 

Understand the causes and challenges of rapid urban change

 

Employ a case study (Mumbai) signifying why quality of life varies within one megacity in an emerging country

Term 3

The UK’s evolving physical landscape

 

Coastal change and conflict

Understand why the physical landscape of the UK varies from place to place

 

 

Understand how geology, climate, physical and human processes create a variety of distinctive coastal landscapes

 

Investigate the impact of coastal management on coastal processes and communities (Walton-on-the-Naze)

 

Year 11

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

River processes and pressures

 

The UK’s evolving human landscape

Understand how geology, climate, physical and human processes create a variety of river landscapes

 

Understand why places and people are changing in the UK

 

Employ a case study (London) signifying how UK cities are changing

 

Investigate how quality of life varies within an urban area (Stratford)

 

Term 2

People and the biosphere

 

 

Forests Under threat

 

 

Consuming energy resources

Understand the importance of the biosphere to human well-being and explore how humans use and modify the biosphere for resources

 

Understand the threats to forest biomes (taiga and tropical rainforest) and explore strategies for reducing these threats

 

Examine how the growing demand for energy can be met without serious environmental consequences

 

 

 

Term 3

Revision

 

 

Health and Social Care

Health and Social Care

Health and Social Care is a vocational subject available to learners aged 14+. It is a BTEC First qualifications where the skills learnt in studying this will aid progression to further study and prepare learners to enter the workplace in due course. In the health and social care sector, typical employment opportunities may be as an apprentice or in a supervised entry role, depending on specific job requirements and age restrictions. This qualification provides learners with a taste of what the health and social care sector is like, enabling them to make informed choices about their future career.

BTEC First Health and Social Care Level 1/2 is taught in Year 10 and 11. It is a two year course which consists of four units taught over the two years. There are three units of coursework (75% of final mark) and one exam unit (25% of final mark) which students have the opportunity re-sit. Each unit consists of 60 guided learning hours where students have the opportunity to gain marks which are graded as Pass Merit and Distinction.
There are two mandatory units which must be completed and 6 optional units where only two are chosen to study. 

This course has been developed to:

  • Give learners the opportunity to gain a broad understanding and knowledge of the health and social care sector
  • Give learners the opportunity to develop a range of personal skills and techniques, through the selection of units that are essential for successful performance in working life
  • Support progression into a more specialised level 3 vocational or academic course or into an apprenticeship.

The exam board is Edexcel, average class size is 15 pupils

This course is recommended to those interested in working and caring for people that need help and support. This can be children, young people, vulnerable adults and the elderly. This course is also recommended for those that want to run their own health or social care business but want and insight to different areas within this field. If you are interested in careers such as midwifery, counselling, dietetics & nutrition, human rights, nursing and more, then this is the course for you.

History

History

More so now than ever, history allows us to understand the world we live in today; to challenge misconceptions about the past, to identify cause and consequence, changes and developments. History encourages classroom debate and discussion, helps develop student independence and opinion, and crucially provides a set of analytical and communication skills that are transferable across many forms of employment, whether you want to teach history, become a business manager, a doctor or a lawyer! It is a profoundly engaging subject that fuels students’ curiosity and encourages people to ask ‘what if’ and ‘why?’

Bishop Challoner History Department staff are passionate, wildly enthusiastic historians and subject experts, having studied at top universities like LSE, Oxford and Cambridge. We love history, and believe it is a subject that empowers young minds, promotes tolerance and respect, as well emphasising how the past resonates directly with the lives we lead today. Above that, we think it is fascinating!

We are exceptionally proud of our results and provide a number of intervention strategies to help students make progress, from mentoring, exam skills and providing revision guides.

Our students gain offers to study at Oxford University, as well as top universities like Durham, Exeter and Warwick, and we actively support students in making these applications, providing personal statement guidance and interview practice.

We are honoured to be part of the Holocaust Educational Trust’s Lessons from Auschwitz Project, where our students have used their experience of visiting the trip to become Holocaust Community Ambassadors- even speaking in front of Mayor Sadiq Khan!

Additionally, we have been awarded Holocaust Beacon School Status from UCL in recognition of our scheme of work on the Holocaust and ‘myth busting’ students’ misconceptions- In 2016 we were given a ‘Quality Mark’ which means we are recognised as a leading department nationally.

Studying history at Bishop ultimately gives students an opportunity to immerse themselves in the past; through meeting WW2 veterans and Holocaust survivors, to completing independent learning projects and actively pursuing their own historical research, to literally using the historic environment around them- from the Tower of London, to Cable Street!

KS3:

Topics you'll study in Year 7:

Were the Romans really ‘rotten’?

Why were the Vikings significant for England?

Did William win the Battle of Hastings just because of good luck?

What was William’s biggest change?

Did Disney have the correct interpretation of King John?

Richard Vs Saladin: who was the greater ‘hero’?

Mughals and Tudors – how similar were the two dynasties?

 

​Topics you'll study in Year 8:

‘The main cause of countries gaining independence from the British Empire was individuals’ Do you agree?

What was the impact of migration to Britain over time?

Explain how Britain has become more democratic over time.

Who or what did the most to help Black people achieve Civil Rights in America?

What was the main cause that led to the outbreak of the First World War?

‘Appeasement of Hitler was the correct policy for Britain between 1933-1939’. How far do you agree with this statement?

Life in Nazi Germany and the Holocaust.

 

Unit Term Topic Theme Lesson Content
Year: 7 
  1 Autumn 1 Romans Were the Romans really 'rotten'? Keywords, making inferences from interpretations
  The mystery of the Maiden castle skeletons and When did the Romans invade Britain?
  The Roman Army and How Significant was the Roman invasion of Britain?
  Who would kill Julius Ceasar?
  Revision and Assessment: Were the Romans really 'Rotten'?
  2 Vikings What impact did the Vikings have on the Anglo Saxo Who were the Vikings? And Why did the Vikings invade? Where did the Vikings settle? And How were the Vikings organised and led?
  What do sources tell us about the Vikings? And Why was King Cnut so great?
  3 Autumn 2 Battle of Hastings Why Did William Win the Battle of Hastings? Who had a claim to the throne in 1066?
  What happened before and during the Battle of Hastings? What were the key causes of William's victories? 
  4 William of Normandy (the Normans) Howdid the Normans Change England? How did the French king change England: The Feudal System and the Domesday Book?
  How did the French king change England: Castles? And What was William’s biggest change?
  Revision and Assessment: 'The Feudal System was William's biggest change'. To what extent do you agree with this statement?
  5 Spring 1 Medieval Kings: King John Did Disney have the correct interpretation of King What were Medieval Kings supposed to do? And Did Disney have the correct interpretation of King John? 
  Students create and peer assess a play based on the life of King John Was King John a good King? And Why were the Baron's angry? Links to Magna Carta 
  Knowldege recap activity in order to judge the usefulnesses of Disney's interpretation, essay plan, essay
  6 The Crusades Who was the greatest hero? What is a crusade? How did Islam spread? What was the relationship of Christianity and Islam?
  The significance of the crusades; The impact of the Third Crusade; Case Study: Richard and Saladin
  7 Spring 2 The Mughal and Tudor Dynasties How were the Mughal and Tudor Empires Similar? Introduction to chronology and geography of the empires
  Similarities between Mughal and Tudor military
  Similarities between Mughal and Tudor religious tolerance and policy
  Similarities between Mughal and Tudor art and cultural achievements
  Assessment and revision
  8 Summer 1 The Hundred Years War What was the significance of the Hundred Years War Introduction to chronology and geography of the war
  What were the causes of the conflict: social, political and eocnomic
  What happened during the wars? Military evens of the conflict
  What were the consequences of the Hundred Years War for France and England?
  Revision
  Assessment
Year: 8 
  9 Autumn 1 The British Empire Why did Britain want an Empire? Introduction to other world empires and the concept of empire; chronology and geography of the British empire
  Exploration of the benefits and significance of having an empire
  Exploration of which countries were in the British Empire and British methods of conquest and influence
  How did Britain lose their Empire?  The diversity of experience within the British Empire; the positive and negative impacts of the British Empire on its inhabitants
  Independence movements in Ireland and India
  Independence movements in Africa; Assessment and revision
  10 Autumn 2 Democracy and Power How did Democracy develop in Britain? Overview of political changes; the loss of power by English Kings
  The Great Reform Act and the Chartists - votes for the working classes
  Votes for women - the Suffragettes and Suffragists; Emily Davidson
  The effects of WWI on democracy and votes for women
  Revision and Assessment
  11 Spring 1 Slavery How did the Slave Trade work? Logistics of the slave trade, the experience of enslaved peoples on the middle passage; resistance and rebellion on plantations
  Why did the slave trade end? The abolition of slavery
  12 Black History in America How did Emancipation affect Black people? The American Civil War; reconstruction and Jim Crow
  To what extent did life for Black people change in Emmett Till, Rosa Parks, Little Rock and overview
  Who was most significant in fighting for Civil Rig Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, The Black Panthers
  Spring 2 Revision and Assessment
  13 World War One What was the main cause of WWI? Introduction to the countries involved in WWI; militarism and alliances
  Imperialism, Nationalism, Assassination of Franz Ferdinand
  Revision and Assessment
  What was it like fighting the Western front? Case Study: Coward and Shell Shock; weapons of the First World War
  Summer 1 The Battle of the Somme; 'Lions led by Donkeys'; How did the Allies win?
  Interwar Peacekeeping Why did the League of Nations fail? Weaknesses of the League; Manchurian Crisis; Abyssinian Crisis
  Was Appeasement the correct choice? Arguments for and against Appeasement
  14 Nazi Germany How did the Nazis come to Power? Hitlers Rise to Power and creastion of a dictatorship
  Did Germans benefit from Nazi rule? Use of propaganda and terror state
  The experience of women and unemployed in Germany 
  Summer 2 The experience of young people and minorities, revision and assessment

 

Year 9

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

The Holocaust and genocide (depth study)

  • In-depth study of the Holocaust – students will build on what they have studied in Year 8 through the story of Leon Greenman in order to ‘bust myths’ surrounding it. 

 

  • Students will then move on to look at the Rwandan and Bosnian Genocides in order to draw comparisons to the Holocaust and consider the importance of ‘busting myths’ surrounding these Genocides. 

 

Cold War in Europe

  • This unit aims to prepare student for the GCSE topic: Cold War in Asia by exploring some of the key substantive concepts such as communism and capitalism, and the key superpowers (USA/USSR). 

 

  • Students will also consider a causation enquiry to establish the key causes of the rising tension in Europe at this time. 

 

Term 2

Cold War in Asia: Korean War

 

Part one: Conflict in Korea 

• The causes of the Korean War 

• The development of the Korean War 

• The end of the Korean War 

 

 

 

 

Cold War in Asia: Vietnam War

 

 

(including revision for March Mocks)

Part two: Escalation of conflict in Vietnam 

• The end of French colonial rule 

• The US involvement 

• Johnson’s War  

 

Part three: The ending of conflict in Vietnam 

• Nixon’s War 

• Opposition to war 

• The end of the war 

 

Term 3

Germany part (1890-1929)

 

  • Part 1: Germany and the growth of democracy
  • Kaiser Wilhelm and the difficulties of ruling Germany; the influence of Prussian militarism, industrialisation, social reform and the growth of socialism, the navy laws
  • The impact of the First World War; War weariness, economic problems, defeat, the Treaty of Versailles, reparations
  • Occupation of the Ruhr, hyperinflation, Weimar democracy, political unrest, the Spartacists, Munich Putsch
  • Weimar Germany- The Stresemann era; the new currency, the Dawes Plan with the USA, the Young Plan, impact of international agreements, Weimar culture
  •  

Revision for End of Year Exams

  • To consolidate knowledge and skills

 

Year 10

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Germany Growth of dictatorship

 

  • Part 2: Germany and the Depression
  • Growth in support for the Nazis, the role of the SA, Hitler’s appeal, effects of the Wall St Crash
  • Nazi election results, the role of Papen and Hindenburg, Hitler’s appointment as Chancellor
  • Establishment of dictatorship; the Reichstag Fire, the Enabling Act, elimination of political opposition, trade unions, Night of the Long Knives, Hitler becomes Fuhrer

 

  • Part 3: the experiences of Germans under the Nazis
  • Economic changes; employment, Strength Through Joy, rearmament, impact of WW2 on the economy
  • Nazi policies towards women, policies towards youth, education, control of the Church,
  • Nazi persecution; racial policies, Aryan ideas, the Final Solution
  • Goebbels; the use of propaganda and censorship, Nazi culture,
  • Use of terror; the SS, Gestapo, role of concentration camps
  • Opposition and resistance; White Rose movement, the Swing Youth, Edelweiss Pirates, July Bomb Plot.
  • Germany in WW2; rationing, propaganda, bombing, surrender

Term 2

Elizabeth

Part one: Elizabeth's court and Parliament
• Elizabeth I and her court: background and character of Elizabeth I; court life, including patronage; key ministers.
• The difficulties of a female ruler: relations with Parliament; the problem of marriage and the succession; the strength of Elizabeth’s authority at the end of her reign, including Essex’s rebellion in 1601.


Part two: Life in Elizabethan times
• A ‘Golden Age’: living standards and fashions; growing prosperity and the rise of the gentry; the Elizabethan theatre and its achievements; attitudes to the theatre.
• The poor: reasons for the increase in poverty; attitudes and responses to poverty; the reasons for government action and the seriousness of the problem.
• English sailors: Hawkins and Drake; circumnavigation 1577–1580, voyages and trade; the role of Raleigh.

Elizabeth and Revision for mid terms

Part three: Troubles at home and abroad
• Religious matters: the question of religion, English Catholicism and Protestantism; the Northern Rebellion; Elizabeth's excommunication; the missionaries; Catholic plots and the threat to the Elizabethan settlement; the nature and ideas of the Puritans and Puritanism; Elizabeth and her government's responses and policies towards religious matters.
• Mary Queen of Scots: background; Elizabeth and Parliament’s treatment of Mary; the challenge posed by Mary; plots; execution and its impact.
• Conflict with Spain: reasons; events; naval warfare, including tactics and technology; the defeat of the Spanish Armada.


Part four: The historic environment of Elizabethan England – Spanish Armada

 

Term 3

Migration Part 1 and 2

Part one: Conquered and conquerors

• Invasion: Vikings and Anglo-Saxons; reasons for Viking invasions; Danelaw; Alfred and Wessex; King Cnut, Emma of Normandy and the North Sea Empire.

• A Norman Kingdom and ‘Angevin’ Empire: relationship between England and France; Henry II; invasion of Ireland; losses under King John.

• The birth of English identity: The Hundred Years’ War and its impact for England’s future development.

 

Part two: Looking west

• Sugar and the Caribbean: piracy and plunder; the development of the slave trade, including John Hawkins; settlements in Barbados and West Indies; economic and social impact of the slave trade on Britain.

• Colonisation in North America: causes and consequences of British colonisation; Raleigh; Jamestown; contact and relations with indigenous peoples; commodities; Pilgrim Fathers; indentured servants; the War of Independence, loss of American colonies.

• Migrants to and from Britain: Huguenot migration; Highland clearances; the Ulster plantations.

 

Revision for End of Year Exam

  • To consolidate knowledge and skills

 

Year 11

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Migration Part 3 and 4

Part three: Expansion and empire

• Expansion in India: causes and impact of British control; East India Company; Robert Clive; Warren Hastings; Indian Rebellion (1857); the social, political, cultural and economic impact of empire on Britain and India.

• Expansion in Africa: causes and impact of British involvement; trade and missionary activity; South Africa; Egypt; the Scramble for Africa; Cecil Rhodes; the Boer War (1899–1902); imperial propaganda.

• Migrants to, from and within Britain: Irish migration to Britain; Jewish migration to Britain; transportation; migration to and within the Empire, including migration of Asians to Africa; migration from rural to urban settings.

 

Part four: Britain in the 20th century

• The end of Empire: the impact of the First and Second World Wars; the impact of Suez; nationalism and independence in India and Africa, including the role of Gandhi, Nkrumrah and Kenyatta.

• The legacy of Empire: ‘Windrush’ and the Caribbean migrants; the work of Claudia Jones in the UK; migration from Asia and Africa, including the role of Amin in Uganda; the Commonwealth; the Falklands War.

 

Term 2

Revision Paper 1

  • To consolidate knowledge and skills of Paper 1

Term 3

Revision Paper 2

  • To consolidate knowledge and skills of Paper 2

 

 

IT

Year 9 – Vocational IT (Cambridge Nationals in IT)

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

 

Module 1

LO1 (R012) Module 1

Understand the tools and techniques that can be used to initiate and plan solutions

  1. Phases of the project life cycle and the tasks carried out in each phase
  • Understand what project management is
  • Identify the phases of the project life cycle
  • Understand what types of task are carried out during each phase of the project life cycle
  • List advantages of following the project life cycle

1.2 Interaction and iteration between the phases of the project life cycle 1

  • Learn that each stage of the project life cycle can repeat at the end of every phase
  • Learn that the process of reviewing work is carried out to inform actions to be implemented within the current phase or next stage of the project life cycle
  • Identify the inputs and outputs of each phase of the project life cycle

 

1.3 The inputs and outputs of each stage of the project life cycle

1.4 Initial project considerations

  • Learn what SMART targets are and how they are useful
  • Learn how to identify user requirements
  • Learn what success criteria are
  • Learn what constraints and limitations there are in a project
  • Learn why it is important to set goals when planning a project

LO2 (R013) Module 1

To be able to initiate and plan a solution to meet an identified need

2.1 Learn how to initiate a project by analysing the requirements to a given context

  • Learn what keyword analysis is
  • Learn how to do a SWOT analysis
  • Begin planning a project by analysing the requirements of a given context
  • Create SMART objectives
  • Create the scope for a project
  • Create the schedule for a project

Term 2

 

Module 2

LO1 (R012) Module 2

Understand the tools and techniques that can be used to initiate and plan solutions

 

2.2 Learn how to mitigate risks through the planning process

  • Identify the risks associated with time, resources, regulation, security and ethical/moral issues
  • Learn about how planning can reduce the risks of a project going wrong or not being completed
  • Understand that preparing for known issues and problems can make a project run more smoothly

 

4.4 Prevention Measures

  • Understand what measures can be taken to prevent data loss when collecting and processing data 
  • Learn about physical prevention measures
  • Learn about logical prevention measures
  • Learn about different methods for the secure destruction of data

4.5 Current legislation, its implications and applications

  • Understand the implications of the law in relation to information technology
  • Produce a mind map to show the legal protection that each law provides
  • Discuss moral and ethical issues relating to the use of information technology

 

Term 3

 

Module 3

LO1 (R012) Module 3

Understand the tools and techniques that can be used to initiate and plan solutions

1.5 Planning tools and the software types used to develop project plans

  • Learn about a variety of project-planning tools and the software types that are used to develop project plans
  • Understand the purpose and components of each planning tool
  • Understand the advantages and disadvantages of different planning tools

 

 

 

 

 

 

LO8 (R103) Module 3

 

To be able to iteratively review the development of the solution

8.1 Learn how to carry out and document an iterative review i.e. Phase review

  • Learn how to carry out a detailed iterative (repeating) phase review
  • Learn what needs to be recorded or documented in a phase review
  • Understand that an iterative phase review is something that is done during or after each phase

 

 

 

 

Year 10 – Vocational IT (Cambridge Nationals in IT)

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

LO3 (R012) Module 4

Understand how data and information can be collected, stored and used

3.1 Data types

  • Learn that information is processed from raw facts and figures known as data
  • Learn about different types of data and understand how they are used in different contexts

 

3.2 Information

  • Understand what type of data and information can be collected
  • Learn how data and information are related to each other

 

LO5 (R013) Module 4

To be able to import and manipulate data to develop a solution to meet an identified need

5.1 Learners should be taught how to create, edit and delete data using appropriate software tools and techniques

 

Spreadsheets

  • Learn how to create, edit and delete and process data using spreadsheet software
  • Learn how to use a variety of functions
  • Understand the difference between relative referencing and absolute referencing
  • Learn how to link spreadsheet worksheets
  • Undertake a ‘what if’ analysis to forecast results
  • Learn how to use macros
  • Learn how to import data from different sources
  • Learn how to link external data to a spreadsheet
  • Learn how to produce charts and graphs
  • Learn how to hide and unhide columns
  • Learn how to apply password protection to cells, sheets, documents and read-only access
  • Learn how to export data to other applications

 

Databases

  • Learn how to create, edit and delete and process data using database software
  • Learn how to create a relational database by linking two tables by using foreign keys
  • Learn how to import data from different sources
  • Learn about different validation techniques such as presence check, length check, format check, lookup value, range check and input mask
  • Learn how to create and use different types of input forms (list box, checkbox, text field, multiple table entry and subforms)
  • Learn how to create and use different controls with the use of macros
  • Learn how to design and create queries using multiple tables, wild cards, parameters, crosstabs, grouping data in a query and complex queries
  • Learn how to design and create a report using multiple tables and results of complex queries
  • Learn how to apply password protection to cells, sheets, documents and read-only access
  • Learn how to export data to other applications

Term 2

 

Module 5

LO6 (R012) Module 5

Understand the different methods of processing data and presenting information

6.1 Selection and justification of the appropriate tools and techniques and formats to process data to meet the defined objectives in a given context

 

6.2 Purpose and suitability of presenting methods

  • Learn that social demographics are to do with gender, age, ethnicity, income, location and accessibility

 

 

  • Understand that all publication designs are based on social demographics with a target audience in mind
  • Learn that social demographics are a human creation and do not reflect an individual’s thoughts or preferences (and, therefore, create content limitations)
  • Learn to identify a target audience of a publication by analysing its content and design features
  • Learn to identify the purpose of a publication using its content and written language

 

6.3 The resources required for presenting information and data and the appropriateness of the use of these in context

  • Learn that social demographics are to do with gender, age, ethnicity, income, location and accessibility
  • Understand that all publication designs are based on social demographics with a target audience in mind
  • Learn that social demographics are a human creation and do not reflect an individual’s thoughts or preferences (and, therefore, create content limitations)
  • Learn to identify a target audience of a publication by analysing its content and design features
  • Learn to identify the purpose of a publication using its content and written language
  • Learn that individuals and organisations share information using a variety of different communication methods
  • Learn about a range of communication methods including messaging services, websites, VoIP, multimedia, cloud based technologies and mobile apps
  • Learn to identify the advantages and disadvantages of sharing and communicating information using technology

 

 

 

LO7 (R013) Module 5

To be able to select and present information in the development of the solution to meet an identified need

7.1 How to select and present information 

7.2 Learners should be taught how to present information using appropriate software tools and techniques

  • Learn about the different ways of presenting information
  • Present the same information in different formats; for example, a report, a presentation, graphs, charts, tables, end user documentation or a mixture of these
  • Understand what to include in the different presentation methods
  • Understand that different tools and techniques can be used to achieve what you intend to do and the outcome that you want
  • Understand that not all tools and techniques need to be used and that some tools may need to be used in one software package and then integrated into a different software package
  • Identify the advantages and disadvantages of presenting information

 

7.3 Learners should be taught presentation techniques

 

 

 

Term 3

Module 6 & 7

LO8 (R103) Module 6

To be able to iteratively review the development of the solution

8.1 Final review

  • Learn how to do a final evaluation of a project
  • Learn what needs to be recorded or documented in the final project review/evaluation
  • Carry out a final project review for the project scenario

 

 

LO3 (R012) Module 7

Understand how data and information can be collected, stored and used

 

3.3 Methods used to collect and store data and information, and the appropriateness of the use of these in a given context

3.4 Storage and the appropriateness of the use of these in context 

3.5 Use of data in a given context including Big Data

 

R013: Coursework (20 hours)

 

Year 11 – Vocational IT (Cambridge Nationals in IT)

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

 

Module 8

LO4 (R012) Module 8

Understand the factors to be considered when collecting and processing data and storing data/information

4.1 Types of threats

4.2 The vulnerabilities –which can be exploited in a cyber-security attack 

4.3 The impacts of a cyber-security attack

4.4 (DETAILED) Prevention methods

 

R013: Coursework (20 hours)

Term 2

LO4 (R012) Module 8

Understand the factors to be considered when collecting and processing data and storing data/information

4.5 Current relevant IT legislation, at time of delivery, its implications and applications

4.6 The importance of validity, reliability and bias when collecting and using data and information

R013: Coursework (20 hours)

R013 Coursework Submission

 

Term 3

 

LO4 (R012)

Understand the factors to be considered when collecting and processing data and storing data/information

R012 Exam Revision

Exam

Mathematics

Mathematics

Traditionally Mathematics has involved knowing the rules to deal with numbers, percentages, areas, equations etc. This course will demonstrate that Mathematics can be used to solve practical problems in everyday situations.

An important aim of the course is to help students talk about Mathematics and use mathematical language correctly. Helping students to read and understand mathematical information given in tables, graphs and diagrams, building confidence to enable you to pass on knowledge to others in a clear, concise and logical way.

 

Unit Term Topic Theme Lesson Content
Year: 7 
  1 Autumn 1 Numbers and the number system Number Addition and subtraction of integers
 
  Multiplication and Division of integers
  BIDMAS and inverse operations
  2 Counting and comparing Multiplication of decimals
 
  3 Defining and classification Division of decimals
  4 Naming and defining Geometry Lines- Definitions

 
   Angles- defintions
  5 Calculating  To calculate angles on a straight line, on a triangle and around a point
  6 Autumn 2 Defining and classification Polygons- definition, classification, angles
 
  5 Calculating Worded problems on triangles: perimeter and angles
  6 Defining and classification Quadrilaterals- definition, classifcation, angles
  5 Calculating Area and perimeter of parallelograms:
 
  6 Defining and classification Trapezia- definition, area and perimeter

 
  Kites- defintion, area and perimeter

Extension: compound shapes with parallelograms and rectangles
  5 Calculating Geometrical problems
  6 Autumn2 Defining and classification Number Factors, multiples and prime numbers
  7 Calculating  Powers

 
   Prime Factor decomposition
 
  Highest Common Factor
 
  Lowest Common Multiple
-
- Recognise factors and multiples
Factor trees and expressing a number as product of prime factors (example: 18=2x3x3)
  8 Spring 1 Fractions- definition, shading, comparison, drawing, reciprocal
  Equivalent fractions
  Compare fractions with different denominator and numerator
 
  Addition and subtraction of fractions
  Multiplication and division of fractions
  Fractions of amounts

 
  Percentages of an amount
  Comparing fractions , decimals and percentages
  Increasing, decreasing an amount by a percentage
  Ratios
  9 Spring 2 Application of Ratios
  Worded problems with ratios
 
  Ratios and direct proportion
 
  Geometry Scales in diagrams
  Statistics Probability
  Experimental probability
 
  10 Defining and classification Geometry Circles- defintion and drawing
 
  Solids
 
  11 Summer 1 Calculating Surface area


 
  Volume of solids
 
  Number Negative numbers
  Multiplication with negative numbers
 
  Division with negative numbers
  Algebra Algebra notation, simplifying expressions and substitution
  Algebra expressions
  1 Autumn 1 Numbers and the number system Number Addition and subtraction of integers
 
  Multiplication and Division of integers
  BIDMAS and inverse operations
  2 Counting and comparing Multiplication of decimals
 
  3 Defining and classification Division of decimals
  4 Naming and defining Geometry Lines- Definitions

 
   Angles- defintions
  5 Calculating  To calculate angles on a straight line, on a triangle and around a point
  6 Autumn 2 Defining and classification Polygons- definition, classification, angles
 
  5 Calculating Worded problems on triangles: perimeter and angles
  6 Defining and classification Quadrilaterals- definition, classifcation, angles
  5 Calculating Area and perimeter of parallelograms:
 
  6 Defining and classification Trapezia- definition, area and perimeter

 
  Kites- defintion, area and perimeter

Extension: compound shapes with parallelograms and rectangles
  5 Calculating Geometrical problems
  6 Autumn2 Defining and classification Number Factors, multiples and prime numbers
  7 Calculating  Powers

 
   Prime Factor decomposition
 
  Highest Common Factor
 
  Lowest Common Multiple
-
- Recognise factors and multiples
Factor trees and expressing a number as product of prime factors (example: 18=2x3x3)
  8 Spring 1 Fractions- definition, shading, comparison, drawing, reciprocal
  Equivalent fractions
  Compare fractions with different denominator and numerator
 
  Addition and subtraction of fractions
  Multiplication and division of fractions
  Fractions of amounts

 
  Percentages of an amount
  Comparing fractions , decimals and percentages
  Increasing, decreasing an amount by a percentage
  Ratios
  9 Spring 2 Application of Ratios
  Worded problems with ratios
 
  Ratios and direct proportion
 
  Geometry Scales in diagrams
  Statistics Probability
  Experimental probability
 
  10 Defining and classification Geometry Circles- defintion and drawing
 
  Solids
 
  11 Summer 1 Calculating Surface area


 
  Volume of solids
 
  Number Negative numbers
  Multiplication with negative numbers
 
  Division with negative numbers
  Algebra Algebra notation, simplifying expressions and substitution
  Algebra expressions
  12 Summer 2 Algebra expanding and simplifying
  Solving equations
  Sequences
 
  Nth term of arithmetic sequences
 
  13 Defining and classification Geometry Congruence

 
  Similarity and enlarement
Year: 8 
  14 Autumn 1 Calculating Number BIDMAS and inverse operations
  Operations with decimals (include working with money) and worded problems
  Fractions, reciprocals and simplifying fractions
  Improper fractions
 
  Addition and subtraction of fractions and worded problems
 
  Multiplication and division of fractions
 
  Fractions of amounts
 
  Percentages

 
  15 Autumn 2 Ratios
  Worded problems with ratios
 
  Ratios and direct proportion
 
  Reverse Percentages
 
  16 Defining and classification Geometry Lines- definition, naming and identification


 
  17 Drawing and interpreting Measuring and drawing angles
  16 Defining and classification Naming angles
  18 Calculating Calculating angles using geometry facts
  16 Defining and classification Polygons: Definition of regular and irregular polygons
  18 Calculating Calculating interior and exterior angles
  16 Defining and classification Triangles: classification and properties
 
  Quadrilaterals: classification and properties
 
  18 Calculating Geometrical problems and ratios
 
  19 Spring 1 Drawing and interpreting Construction of triangles
 
  Constructing bisectors and shapes
 
  20 Defining and classification Circles defining, naming, area and circumference
 
  21 Calculating Area of circles
 
  Sectors
 
  Arcs
 
  Number Powers and roots
 
  Index laws and standard form
 
  Factors, multiples and prime numbers
 
  Highest Common Factor  and Lowest Common Factor
  22 Spring 2 Negative numbers
 
  Algebra Algebra simpification, writing expressions and subsitutions
 
  Expanding and factorising brackets
  Solving equation: One step equations and two step equations
 
  Algebraic Problems
 
  23 Drawing and interpreting Coordinates
 
  22 Calculating Drawing straight line graphs
  Equation of a straight line
 
  24 Summer 1 Direct proportion on graphs
 
  Number Direct proportion as a special type of ratio
  Probability
  Algebra Sequences (arithmetic, geometric, Fibonacci)
  Nth term
  Statistics Averages 
  25 Drawing and interpreting Pictogram charts
  Bar charts
  Summer 2 Scatter graphs
  Pie charts
  Line graphs
  26 Defining and classification Geometry Congruence and similarity
  27 Drawing and interpreting Symmetry
  Rotational symmetry 
  Enlargement 
  Reflection 
  Translation
  Rotation
  28 Calculating Solids recap- names, definitions , nets and sketching
  Surface area
  Volume of solids

Year 9 - Foundation

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Unit 1 – Number

Unit 2 – Algebra

  • Multiply and divide positive and negative numbers
  • Evaluate expressions involving squares, cubes and roots
  • Compare and order decimal numbers using the symbols <, >
  • Round to a given number of decimal places.
  • Round to any given number of significant figures
  • Manipulate and simplify algebraic expressions by collecting ‘like’ terms
  • Substitute numbers into a formula
  • Simplify expressions involving brackets
  • Factorise algebraic expressions by taking out common factors.
  • Forming algebraic expressions

Term 2

Unit 3 – Graphs, tables and charts

Unit 4 – Fractions and percentages

  • Extract data from lists and tables
  • Use information provided to complete a two-way table
  • Frequency tables
  • Construct and interpret simple pie charts
  • Draw scatter graphs
  • Order fractions, by using a common denominator
  • Add, subtract, multiply and divide fractions
  • Convert between fractions, decimals and percentages.
  • Increase/decrease quantities using percentages
  • Use percentages in real-life situations
  • Use a multiplier to increase or decrease by a percentage

Term 3

Unit 5 – Equations, inequalities and sequences

Unit 6 – Angles

  • Use function machines
  • Solve linear equations
  • Substitute into a formula, and solve the resulting equation
  • Show inequalities on number lines
  • Find the nth term of an arithmetic sequence
  • Estimate sizes of angles
  • Draw sketches of shapes
  • Find missing angles using properties of corresponding and alternate angles
  • Tessellations
  • Calculate and use the angles of regular polygons

Year 10 - Foundation

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Unit 7 – Averages and Range

Unit 8 – Perimeter, Area and Volume 1

Unit 9 – Graphs

  •  Calculate the mean, mode, median and range for discrete data
  • Reverse mean
  • Mean, mode and median from a frequency table
  • Mean, mode and median from a bar chart
  • Convert metric units to metric units
  • Convert between metric volume measures
  • Area and perimeter of rectangles, triangles, parallelograms and trapezia
  • Identify and name common solids: cube, cuboid, cylinder, prism, pyramid, sphere and cone;
  • Sketch nets of cuboids and prisms
  • Find the volume of a prism, including a triangular prism, cube and cuboid
  • Find the surface area of a prism
  • Find the coordinates of the midpoint of a line segment
  • Plot and draw graphs of straight lines of the form y = mx + c using a table of values.
  • Identify parallel lines from their equations
  • Find the equation of a straight line from a graph
  • Draw and interpret distance–time graphs and velocity–time graphs

Term 2

Unit 10 – Transformations

Unit 11 – Ratio and Proportion

Unit 12 – Right-angled triangles

 

  • Reflections
  • Translations
  • Rotations
  • Enlargement
  • Write ratios in form 1 : m or m : 1 and to describe a situation
  • Write ratios in their simplest form, including three-part ratios
  • Write a ratio as a fraction
  • Proportional reasoning: Use a ratio to find one quantity when the other is known
  • Divide a given quantity using a ratio.
  • Use a ratio to find one quantity when the other is known
  • Scale up recipes
  • Best buy questions.
  • Convert between currencies.
  • Pythagoras
  • Calculate the length of the hypotenuse.
  • Calculate the length of the shorter side in a right angled triangle
  • Exact trig values
  • SOHCAHTOA to find angles and lengths in 2D figures/problems.

Term 3

Unit 13 – Probability

Unit 14 – Multiplicative Reasoning

Unit 15 – Constructions, loci and bearings

  • Probability of an event
  • Mutually exclusive events
  • Sample space diagrams
  • Experimental and theoretical probability
  • Venn diagrams and set notation
  • Tree diagrams
  • Percentages using a multiplier
  • Reverse Percentages
  • Compound interest
  • Conversions m/s to km/hr, g to kg, cm2 to m2 etc
  • Use kinematics formulae from the formulae sheet to calculate speed, acceleration, etc (with variables defined in the question)
  • Speed, Distance, Time
  • Density, Mass, Volume
  • Pressure, Force, Area
  • Direct proportion
  • Inverse Proportion
  • Draw circles and arcs to a given radius or given the diameter
  • Measure and draw lines, to the nearest mm;
  • Measure and draw angles, to the nearest degree
  • Make accurate drawings of triangles and other 2D shapes using a ruler and a protractor
  • Know the terms face, edge and vertex and identify quantities of each on 3D shapes.
  • Given the quantities of faces, edges and vertices, identify 3D shapes.
  • Understand and draw front and side elevations and plans of shapes made from simple solids;
  • Constructions
  • Construct the perpendicular bisector of a given line;
  • Construct the perpendicular from a point to a line;
  • Construct the bisector of a given angle
  • Loci:
  • Find and describe regions satisfying a combination of loci;
  • Use constructions to solve loci problems (2D only)
  • Use and interpret maps and scale drawings
  • Bearings:
  • Give a bearing between the points on a map
  • Construct bearings
  • Use accurate drawing to solve bearings problems

Year 11 - Foundation

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Unit 16 – Quadratic equations and graphs

Unit 17 – Perimeter, area and volume 2

Unit 18 –Fractions, indices and standard form

  • Multiply together two algebraic expressions with brackets
  • Factorise quadratic expressions of the form x2 + bx + c
  • Solve quadratic equations by factorising
  • Generate points and plot graphs of simple quadratic functions, then more general quadratic functions.
  • Find approximate solutions to quadratic equations using a graph
  • Recognise, sketch and interpret graphs of simple cubic functions
  • Recognise, sketch and interpret graphs of the reciprocal function  with x ≠ 0
  • Recognise, sketch and interpret graphs of quadratic, cubic and reciprocal functions
  • Circles
  • Find circumferences and areas enclosed by circles
  • Find the perimeters and areas of semicircles and quarter-circles
  • Find radius or diameter, given area or perimeter of a circles
  • Sectors of circles
  • Find the area of a sector
  • Find the arc length of a sector
  • Find the perimeter of a sector
  • Volume and surface area of cylinders
  • Volume and surface area of pyramids and cones
  • Volume and surface area of spheres and composite solids
  • Use index laws to simplify and calculate the value of numerical expressions involving multiplication and division of integer powers, powers of a power and negatives.
  • Convert large and small numbers into standard form and vice versa
  • Add and subtract numbers in standard form
  • Multiply and divide numbers in standard form

Term 2

Unit 19 – Congruence, similarity and vectors

Unit 20 – More algebra

 

  • Use the basic congruence criteria for triangles (SSS, SAS, ASA and RHS)
  • Understand similarity of triangles and of other plane shapes, use this to make geometric inferences, and solve angle problems using similarity
  • Understand and use column notation in relation to vectors
  • Be able to represent information graphically given column vectors
  • Identify two column vectors which are parallel
  • Calculate using column vectors, and represent graphically, the sum of two vectors, the difference of two vectors and a scalar multiple of a vector.
  • Solve simultaneous equations (linear/linear) algebraically and graphically
  • Change the subject of a formula involving the use of square roots and squares

Term 3

Revision of all units

  • Focus on revision of previous topics that students were not able to do based on the November and March mocks

 

 

Year 9 - Higher

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Unit 1 – Number

Unit 2 – Algebra

  • Estimate answers to one- or two-step calculations
  • Find the prime factor decomposition of positive integers
  • Multiply and divide using index laws
  • Venn diagrams
  • Multiply and divide numbers in standard form
  • Simplify surd expressions
  • Manipulate an expression by collecting like terms
  • Substitution
  • Expanding double brackets
  • Factorise quadratic expressions
  • Set up and solve linear equations

Term 2

Unit 3 – Intepreting and representing data

Unit 4 – Fractions, ratio and proportion

  • Design and use two-way tables for discrete and grouped data
  • Calculate mean and range, find median and mode
  • Construct and interpret grouped frequency tables for continuous data
  • Draw and interpret scatter graphs
  • Construct and interpret time–series graphs
  • Add, subtract, multiply and divide fractions – include mixed numbers
  • Find a percentage of a quantity using a multiplier
  • Convert between fractions, decimals and percentages
  • Divide a given quantity using a ratio
  • Convert between currencies

Term 3

Unit 5 – Angles and trigonometry

Unit 6 – Graphs

  • Understand and use the angle properties of parallel lines
  • Calculate the angles of regular polygons and use these to solve problems
  • Understand, recall and use Pythagoras’ Theorem in 2D
  • SOHCAHTOA to find angles and lengths in 2D figures/problems
  • Plot and draw graphs of straight lines of the form y = mx + c
  • Find the equation of the line through two given points
  • Generate points and plot graphs of simple quadratic functions

Year 10 - Higher

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Unit 7 – Area and volume

Unit 8 – Transformations and constructions

Unit 9 – Equations and inequalities

  • Area and perimeter of rectangles, triangles, parallelograms and trapezia
  • Volume of prisms
  • Surface area of prisms
  • Conversions
  • Circles
  • Find circumferences and areas enclosed by circles
  • Find the perimeters and areas of semicircles and quarter-circles
  • Find radius or diameter, given area or perimeter of a circles
  • Sectors of circles
  • Find the area of a sector
  • Find the arc length of a sector
  • Find the perimeter of a sector
  • Volume and surface area of cylinders
  • Volume and surface area of pyramids and cones
  • Volume and surface area of spheres and composite solids
  • Reflections
  • Translations
  • Rotations
  • Enlargement
  • Make accurate drawings of triangles and other 2D shapes using a ruler and a protractor
  • Know the terms face, edge and vertex and identify quantities of each on 3D shapes.
  • Given the quantities of faces, edges and vertices, identify 3D shapes.
  • Understand and draw front and side elevations and plans of shapes made from simple solids;
  • Constructions
  • Construct the perpendicular bisector of a given line;
  • Construct the perpendicular from a point to a line;
  • Construct the bisector of a given angle
  • Loci:
  • Find and describe regions satisfying a combination of loci;
  • Use constructions to solve loci problems (2D only)
  • Use and interpret maps and scale drawings
  • Change the subject of a formula
  • Factorise and solve quadratic expressions
  • Solve quadratic equations by using the quadratic formula
  • Set up and solve quadratic equations
  • Completing the square
  • Solve quadratic equations by completing the square.
  • Deduce turning points by completing the square.
  • Sketch quadratics

Term 2

Unit 15 – Equations and graphs

Unit 7 – Area and Volume

Unit 10 – Probability

Unit 14 – Further statistics

 

  • Solve simultaneous equations
  • Solve simultaneous equations containing a quadratic.
  • Show inequalities on number lines
  • Solve inequalities graphically
  • Solve quadratic inequalities.
  • Represent the solution set for inequalities using set notation
  • Solve quadratic inequalities
  • Calculate the upper and lowers bounds of numbers given to varying degrees of accuracy;
  • Find the upper and lower bounds of calculations involving perimeters, areas and volumes of 2D and 3D shapes
  • Calculate the upper and lower bounds of more complex calculations, particularly when working with measurements
  • Probability of an event
  • Mutually exclusive events
  • Sample space diagrams
  • Experimental and theoretical probability
  • Venn diagrams and set notation
  • Tree diagrams
  • Sampling
  • Box plots
  • Cumulative Frequency graphs
  • Histograms
  • Comparing data

Term 3

Unit 11 – Multiplicative reasoning

Unit 12 – Similarity and congruence

Unit 17 – More algebra

  • Compound interest and depreciation
  • Conversions m/s to km/hr, m2 to cm2 etc
  • Use kinematics formulae from the formulae sheet to calculate speed, acceleration, etc (with variables defined in the question)
  • Speed, Distance, Time
  • Density, Mass, Volume
  • Pressure, Force, Area
  • Direct proportion
  • Inverse Proportion
  • Use the basic congruence criteria for triangles (SSS, SAS, ASA and RHS)
  • Similar shapes
  • Identify the scale factor of an enlargement of a similar shape as the ratio of the lengths of two corresponding sides, using integer or fraction scale factors
  • Use the linear/area/volume scale factor to work out missing values
  • Simplify algebraic fractions
  • Multiply and divide algebraic fractions
  • Add and subtract algebraic fractions
  • Solve quadratic equations arising from algebraic fraction equations
  • Proofs - using consecutive integers (n, n + 1), squares a2, b2, even numbers 2n, odd numbers 2n +1

Year 11 - Higher

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Unit 13 – Trigonometry

Unit 16 – Circle theorems

Unit 18 – Vectors and geometric proof

  • Know and apply Area = ab sin C
  • Know the sine and cosine rules and use to solve 2/3D problems (including involving bearings)
  • Circle theorems
  • Understand and use theorems.
  • Give reasons for missing angles in problem solving questions, using circle theorems.
  • Ensure isosceles triangles are a focus.
  • Vectors
  • Understand and use vector notation.
  • Work out the magnitude of a vector.
  • Calculate using vectors and represent the solutions graphically.
  • Calculate the resultant of two vectors.
  • Solve problems using vectors.
  • Use the resultant of two vectors to solve vector problems (including ratio problems)
  • Express points as position vectors.
  • Prove lines are parallel.
  • Prove points are collinear.

 

Term 2

Unit 19 – Proportion and graphs

Unit 15 – Equations and graphs

  • Recognise, sketch and interpret graphs of exponential functions y = kx for positive values of k and integer values of x.
  • Estimate the gradient of a quadratic or non-linear graph at a given point by sketching the tangent and finding its gradient
  • Estimate area under a quadratic or other graph by dividing it into trapezia
  • Transformation of functions
  • Translating and reflecting graphs of functions for linear, quadratic, cubic and trigonometric functions
  • Sketching Quadratics
  • Sketching Cubics
  • Use function notation e.g. f(x) = 5x + 1, then f(1) =
  • Inverse functions, e.g. f(x) = 2x + 3, f-1(x) =
  • Composite functions, e.g. f(x) = 2x + 3, g(x) = x2, gf(x) =
  • Iteration
  • Combinations/Product rule for counting

 

Term 3

Revision of all units

  • Focus on revision of previous topics that students were not able to do based on the November and March mocks

Media

Media

Overview:

Component 1: Exploring Media Language and Representation (40%)

Component 2: Understanding Media Forms and Products (30%)

Component 3: Non-examination assessment (30%)

 

“The media is the most powerful entity on Earth. They have the power to make the innocent guilty and to make the guilty innocent, and that’s power. They control the minds of the masses” – Malcolm X

Every day you are exposed to newspaper headlines, film trailers, advertising on billboards, and constant updates on your social media accounts. What could be more important than thinking critically about the messages you are receiving? How is your life impacted by the media you consume? How does the mainstream media manipulate the masses to maintain the status quo? What are the consequences? What are the alternatives? What might the future hold?

 

Btec Level 2 Tech Award in Creative Media Production

Year 9

Term 1: Introduction to Media Key Concepts and Practical Skills

Media Language

  • To develop basic textual analysis skills.
  • To identify and explain elements of mise en scene and cinematography using denotation/connotation analysis structure.
  • To apply and consolidate textual analysis skills in the deconstruction of a range of print-based media texts.

Representation

  • To develop basic knowledge and understanding of the way in which people, places, events and issues are portrayed in the media.

Narrative

  • To develop basic knowledge and understanding of the ways in which media texts are structured to create meaning to the audience.

Audience

  • To develop basic knowledge and understanding of the relationship between media products and the target audience.

Photoshop Technical skills

  • To develop a range of image manipulation skills and design techniques using Adobe photoshop software.
  • Resizing images, cropping images, deleting backgrounds, text (Insert, resize, colour, font style, effects) colour filters, lighting adjustments, colour balance, using layers.

 

Practical Production

To create a range of print publishing media texts using appropriate layout and design conventions

  • Re- create existing print adverts
  • Re- create an existing magazine cover
  • Create an original magazine cover with original images

 

Year 9

Term 2 Component 1: Exploring Media Products

Learning Aim A:

Investigate Media Products

 

 

 

  • To identify and categorise media products into relevant media sectors (audio/visual, publishing and interactive).
  • To analyse own media consumption and consider how media products are accessed across a range of different mediums.

Introduction to audiences-

  • Students identify and explain the target audience (age range, gender and ethnicity) for a range of media products across the three sectors (audio/visual, publishing and interactive).
  • To develop knowledge and understanding of primary, secondary, mass and niche audiences. Students will apply their knowledge to a range of media products across the three media sectors  (audio/visual, publishing and interactive).
  • To identify and explain the purpose of media products across the three sectors (audio/visual, publishing and interactive).
  • To evaluate  own media consumption in relation to the three purposes (information, entertainment, escapism). More able students will apply the uses and gratification theory to the media products they consume.
  • To develop knowledge and understanding of socio-economic groups and create lifestyle audience profiles for a range of media products.

Assignment 1: Exploring Media Products

Summative assessment and initial research.

The report must include media products past and present across the three sectors, and analyse:

the target audience for each product

the purpose of each product

the relationship between product, target audience and purpose.

Year 9

Term 3 Component 2: Exploring Media Products

Learning Aim B:

Explore how digital media products are created to provide meaning and engage audiences

B1: Genre, narrative, representation and audience interpretation

To develop knowledge and understanding of genre focusing on media products from the audio/visual sector.

 

  • To identify the different genres for a range of film and television texts.
  • To categorise television and film texts into hybrid and subgenres.
  • To develop knowledge and understanding of genre by analysing the codes and conventions across a range of British television sitcoms.
  • To examine how British television sitcom conventions have developed over time through textual analysis of set texts.
  • To apply Steve Neale’s ‘repetition and Difference’ genre theory to analyses work.
  • To develop and apply knowledge and understanding of hybrid and subgenre to British television sitcoms.
  • To examine how and why the codes and conventions can be subverted in sitcoms, through textual analysis of set texts.
  • To compare and contrast the social contexts of British/American sitcoms and examine how it effects the use of codes and conventions in a range of UK/US texts.

To develop knowledge and understanding of narrative focusing on media products from the audio/visual sector.

 

  • To develop knowledge and understanding of narrative focusing on media products from the audio/visual sector.
  • To identify and explain a range of narrative structures (Linear, non-linear, open ended, closed, circular, interactive, multi strand and single strand).
  • To apply knowledge and understanding of narrative structure to a range of film and TV texts.
  • To consolidate knowledge and understanding of narrative structures by recreating narrative structures from existing film and television texts.

 

 

Assignment 2: Exploring Media Products

Summative Assessment:

The report must include media products from one of the three sectors, and must analyse how:

  • Genre, narrative and representation combine to create meaning
  • How the audience may respond to the product
  • How media production techniques combine to create meaning.

 

 

Year 10

Term 1 Component 2: Developing digital media production skills (audio/moving image)

Learning Aim A: Develop Media Production Skills and Techniques

A1: Practical skills and techniques

To develop skills and techniques for creating content relevant to the audio/moving image sector;

  • Shooting video in different locations
  • Shot composition
  • Framing, angle, camera movement
  • Recording audio in a studio and on location, acoustics, microphones, ambient sound, recording levels

 

Year 10

Term 2 Component 2: Developing digital media production skills (audio/moving image)

Learning Aim B:

Apply Media Production Skills and Techniques

B1: Pre-production processes and practices

T demonstrate imaginative application of pre-production, skills and techniques when reworking aspects of an existing media product, leading to creative outcomes.

 

e.g. sound script, shooting script, storyboard.

The assignment will require students to apply media skills and techniques to ‘re-imagine’ an existing media product for a new teenage audience, e.g. produce a scene from a blockbuster action film or music video recreated in the local area.

 

B2: Production processes and practices

e.g. recording audio, shooting footage.

The assignment will require students to apply media skills and techniques to ‘re-imagine’ an existing media product for a new teenage audience, e.g. produce a scene from a blockbuster action film or music video recreated in the local area.

Students will demonstrate imaginative application of production skills and techniques when reworking aspects of an existing media product, leading to creative outcomes.

 

 

B3: Post-production processes and practices

The assignment will require students to apply media skills and techniques to ‘re-imagine’ an existing media product for a new teenage audience, e.g. produce a scene from a blockbuster action film or music video recreated in the local area.

Students will use optimisation and compression techniques, e.g. rendering audio and video.

 

 

Year 10

Term 3 Component 2: Developing digital media production skills (audio/moving image)

Learning Aim C:

Review of progress and development

 

C1: Review of progress and development

To analyse own development and application of skills and techniques, using considered examples to identify strengths and set targets for improvement.

  • Development of skills and techniques
  • Responding to audience/user feedback
  • Identifying strengths and areas for development
  • Actions and targets for future production work
  • Reference to professional working practice
  • Use of terminology appropriate to the media field.

 

 

 

Year 11

Term 1 Component 3: Create a Media Product in Response to a Brief

Learning Aim A:

Develop Ideas in Response to a brief

A1: Responding to a brief –

  • To establishing the purpose, technical requirements of the brief and define the target audience.
  • To Research similar existing media products, within the publishing media sector, to understand the market place/competition.
  • To compare and contrast a range of media products from the following categories: mainstream, niche, alternative, generic, unconventional
  • To evaluate a media product in terms of how effective it is in targeting the audience.
  • To analyse the stylistic and technical codes in a media product (magazine/digital print advert campaign) from the publishing sector.
  • To carry out a Content analysis to establish the contents, order and sequencing within the media product (magazine/print advert campaign).

A2: Generating ideas

  • To explore and consider different ideas for a magazine/print advert campaign, including its content and style in order to develop a coherent product proposal.
  • To analyse and interpret current trends and innovative practice within the magazine and advertising industry.
  • To reflect upon creative ideas by consistently selecting, revising and developing creative ideas based on primary and secondary research into similar existing products.

 

 

 

Learning Aim B:

Develop pre-production materials in response to a brief

B1: Planning materials

To produce digital publishing planning materials that are sufficiently detailed to enable the client to visualise the proposed product.

  • To continue to develop and refine a range of pre -production planning skills relevant to the publishing media sector.
  • Page layout and design
  • Thumbnail sketches
  • Design annotations
  • To evaluate planning documents and make necessary revisions.

Year 11

Term 2 Component 3: Create a Media Product in Response to a Brief

Learning Aim B:

Develop pre-production materials in response to a brief

B2: Managing the production process

To evaluate production process and documents making necessary revisions where necessary.

  • narrated screen recordings
  • annotated screenshots
  • video and audio recordings
  • annotated drafts or mock-ups of practical work

 

 

 

Learning Aim C:

Apply skills and techniques to the creation of a media product

C2: Production skills and techniques

Sourcing content from secondary sources.

 

C3: Combining and refining content

Students will record an advanced skills audit to revise, consolidate and extend their practical creative skills in the following software packages and technical areas;

  • Software: Adobe Photoshop/In Design
  • Stylistic codes: mise en scène, lighting.
  • Combining assets for the magazine pages/adverts: alignment, formatting text and images, use of colour, typography.
  • aligning text and images
  • use of white space
  • creating a visual hierarchy
  • balance and contrast
  • Adding interactivity: usability/playability.
  • previewing magazine/advert campaign drafts for consistency in fonts, colours, layout and design.

 

 

 

Year 11

Term 3 Component 3: Create a Media Product in Response to a Brief

Learning Aim C:

Apply skills and techniques to the creation of a media product.

C4: Testing and exporting for distribution

Compressing media products and exporting in appropriate file formats for the chosen distribution platform.

 

External Summative Assessment:

 Exam date TBC

 

 

GCSE Media Studies

Year 9

Term 1

Denotation/Connotation Image Analysis

  • know and understand the process of deconstructed media texts through denotation/connotation analysis.
  • analyse text examples using denotation/connotation structure to explore how meaning is created through images and words.

Photoshop Introduction

  • know the basics of Photoshop including setting up a document, importing images, resizing objects, deleting backgrounds, and changing colours, as well as using layers.
  • know how to set up photography equipment safely
  • apply knowledge to make a copy of an existing film poster

Introduction to narrative theory

  • know and understand structuralism theory including Todorov, Propp, and Levi-Strauss
  • apply these theories to example texts
  • analyse texts to suggest how micro elements construct narrative meaning
  • evaluate the extent to which structuralism theory can be applied to a text.

 

 

Year 9

Term 2

Component 1A: Images, Language, Layout & Design, Narrative and Intertextuality

  • carry out denotation/connotation analysis to engage with the way meaning is created in images from print advertising (This Girl Can & Quality Street) magazine covers (GQ & Pride), film posters (Spectre & TMWTGG). This will include exploring mise-en-scene, camerawork, and editing.
  • carry out denotation/connotation analysis to engage with the way media language is communicated through language (words) used in the set texts.
  • carry out denotation/connotation analysis to engage with the way media language is communicated through page layout and design used in the set texts
  • carry out denotation/connotation analysis to suggest how micro elements construct narrative meaning
  • evaluate the extent to which structuralism theory can be applied to a text.
  • carry out denotation/connotation analysis to engage with the way media language is communicated through intertextuality used in the set texts
  • evaluate the impact of intertextuality on the creation of meaning

 

 

Year 9

Term 3

Component 1A: Images, Language, Layout & Design, Narrative and Intertextuality

  • carry out denotation/connotation analysis to engage with the way meaning is created in images in newspapers (The Sun, The Times). This will include exploring mise-en-scene, camerawork, and editing.
  • carry out denotation/connotation analysis to engage with the way media language is communicated through language (words) used in the set texts.
  • carry out denotation/connotation analysis to engage with the way media language is communicated through page layout and design used in the set texts
  • carry out denotation/connotation analysis to suggest how micro elements construct narrative meaning
  • evaluate the extent to which structuralism theory can be applied to a text.
  • carry out denotation/connotation analysis to engage with the way media language is communicated through intertextuality used in the set texts
  • evaluate the impact of intertextuality on the creation of meaning

 

Component 1A: Representation

  • to know and understand representation theory including Laura Mulvey and Paul Gilroy.
  • to analyse the set texts and unseen texts to draw out the way representations have been constructed.
  • to evaluate the extent to which representation theory can be applied to the set text, and compare and contrast the representation to an unseen text.
  • to make judgements about the representation and how it reflects the context in which the product was made

 

 

Year 10

Term 1

Component 1B: Fortnite

  • to know and understand the nature of media production by large organisations, focusing on the production context of Fortnite
  • to analyse the effect of ownership and control on the production and distribution of Fortnite
  • to analyse the impact of convergence on the production, distribution and exhibition of Fortnite
  • to evaluate the impact of regulation on the video games industry
  • to know the ways audiences are categorised
  • to analyse the ways Fortnite targets audiences through marketing and the role of media technologies in reaching audiences
  • to evaluate the different ways audiences might interpret media products and how they use media products such as Fortnite, referring to the Uses and Gratifications theory.

Component 1B:

The Archers

  • to know and understand the nature of media production by large organisations, focusing on the production context of The Archers
  • to analyse the effect of ownership and control on the production and distribution of The Archers
  • to analyse the impact of convergence on the production, distribution and exhibition of The Archers
  • to evaluate the impact of regulation on the radio industry
  • to know the ways audiences are categorised
  • to analyse the ways The Archers targets audiences through marketing and the role of media technologies in reaching audiences
  • to evaluate the different ways audiences might interpret media products and how they use media products such as The Archers,  referring to the Uses and Gratifications theory.

Year 10

Term 2

Component 1B:

The Sun

  • to know and understand the nature of media production by large organisations, focusing on the production context of The Sun
  • to analyse the effect of ownership and control on the production and distribution of The Sun
  • to analyse the impact of convergence on the production, distribution and exhibition of The Sun
  • to evaluate the impact of regulation on the newspaper industry
  • to know the ways audiences are categorised
  • to analyse the ways The Sun targets audiences through marketing and the role of media technologies in reaching audiences
  • to evaluate the different ways audiences might interpret media products and how they use media products such as The Sun, referring to the Uses and Gratifications theory.

Component 1B: Spectre

  • to know and understand the nature of media production by large organisations, focusing on the production context of Spectre
  • to analyse the effect of ownership and control on the production and distribution of Spectre
  • to analyse the impact of convergence on the production, distribution and exhibition of Spectre
  • to evaluate the impact of regulation on the film industry
  • to know the ways audiences are categorised
  • to analyse the ways Spectre targeted audiences through marketing and the role of media technologies in reaching audiences
  • to evaluate the different ways audiences might interpret media products and how they use media products such as Spectre, referring to the Uses and Gratifications theory.

Year 10

Term 3

Component 3: Controlled Assessment

  • know and understand the codes and conventions of the selected genre for production (confirmed by exam board in March 2021)
  • to analyse professional products engaging with key concepts including media language, representation, industry, and audience (e.g. analysis of film posters in selected genre).
  • to apply understanding to create a new idea for a media production (e.g. create a film poster and DVD cover), including evaluating the idea in terms of genre codes and conventions, narrative, industry, media language, and audience appeal.
  • to create products using practical skills including photography and use of Photoshop.

 

Year 11

Term 1

Component 2A: Luther & The Sweeney

  • to know and understand the codes and conventions of TV drama, with a focus on crime drama.
  • to understand theoretical perspectives on genre including principles of repetition and variation, hybridity, and intertextuality.
  • to apply narrative theory to the set text, including Propp, Todorov, Levi-Strauss and Barthes.
  • to know and understand the principles of media language including revisiting mise-en-scene and cameras, and introducing editing and sound.
  • to analyse the way media language creates meaning in the set text through mise-en-scene, camerawork, editing, and sound.
  • to analyse representations within the set text including representations of: heroes and villains; gender; place; realism.
  • to analyse the significance of social, cultural, and political representations in terms of themes and issues explores in the set text
  • to evaluate the reasons for particular representations including the under-representation and misrepresentation of particular social groups.
  • to know and understand the impact media ownership has on media production and distribution, with a focus on the BBC and other distributors of Luther.
  • to analyse the way Luther appeals to a range of audiences and how audiences are targeted through marketing and distribution.
  • to evaluate why and how audiences engage with Luther, with reference to the Uses and Gratifications theory.

Year 11

Term 2

Component 2B: Music videos and online media (Bad Blood, Uptown Funk, Rio, plus artists’ websites)

  • to know and understand the codes and conventions of music video
  • to understand theoretical perspectives on genre including principles of repetition and variation, hybridity, and intertextuality.
  • to apply narrative theory to the set texts, including Propp, Todorov, Levi-Strauss and Barthes.
  • to know and understand the principles of media language including revisiting mise-en-scene and cameras, editing and sound.
  • to analyse the way media language creates meaning in the set texts through mise-en-scene, camerawork, editing, and sound.
  • to analyse representations within the set texts including: representations of ethnicity and gender
  • to analyse the significance of social, cultural, and political representations in terms of themes and issues explores in the set texts
  • to evaluate the reasons for particular representations including the under-representation and misrepresentation of particular social groups.
  • to know and understand the impact media ownership has on media production and distribution
  • to analyse the ways the set texts and artists appeals to a range of audiences and how audiences are targeted through marketing and distribution.
  • to evaluate why and how audiences engage with the set texts and artists, with reference to the Uses and Gratifications theory.

Year 11

Term 3

Revision

Exam practice focusing on Component 1A and 1B.

Music

Music

  • We have a fantastically well-resourced Music Department:
  • Two full sized teaching classrooms with Apple Mac computers and MIDI Keyboards.
  • Eight practice rooms each with an upright piano (one with a Baby Grand Piano) and a Keyboard for breakout performance space.
  • A recital room with a Yamaha Baby Grand Piano that is used for instrumental workshops and recitals.
  • A recording studio with state of the art recording equipment used in KS3 & KS4 lessons.
  • A Yamaha Grand Piano within the Theatre used for ABRSM Examinations and weekly recitals.
  • A Grand Piano in the Drama Studio, allowing cross curricular work with the Drama Department.

All Music lessons enable pupils to develop highly-desirable skills in areas such as self-management, teamwork, problem-solving and communication, all areas which are looked upon extremely favourably by top Universities and employers.

At Key Stage 3 our pupils focus on the building blocks of Music. Pupils’ learning will range from how to play a Musical instrument to learning how to listen to and describe music appropriately. Pupils study a range of topics, some of which are listed:

  • Reading Music
  • Creating their own instruments
  • African Music
  • Film Music
  • Rap Music
  • Blues Music 


At the start of Year 7, students are given the option of learning how to play an instrument. A “Taster Week” is given and pupils can see the range of instruments they can learn.

There are many extracurricular clubs which run before, during and after school

Unit Term Topic Theme Lesson Content
Year: 7 
  1 Autumn Stomp Note Values Note values / Rhythmic patterns  / call and response
  Rhythm  Note values / Rhythmic patterns  / call and response / composing ostinatos
  Reading Note Values  Drum notation / composing
  Composing in a group Structuring a piece of Music / Composing Music / Notation
  Composing & Performing in a group
  Performing a group performance Performing an assessment / feedback
  2 Autumn  The Keyboard Treble stave notation and Right Hand playing Treble Clef Notation / Finding Middle C / C Major Scale / 5 note pieces
  Treble Clef Notation / 5 note pieces / performing to pupils
  Assesment Preparation Treble Clef Notation / Ode to Joy Assessment Preparation
  Keyboard Assessment Ode to Joy Assessment 
  3 Spring The Orchestra Family of instruments Families of Instruments / Treble Clef Notation / Keyboard task
  Brass Section Recognising Brass Instruments / Darth Vader Theme Task
  Woodwind Section Recognising Woodwind Instruments / Gabriel's Oboe Task
  Percussion Section Recognising Percussion Instruments / Polyrhythmic Composition
  String Section Canon on Keyboards / Open Stringed Violins
  4 Carnival of the Animals Appraising Music Music Vocabulary / How to describe music / Keyboard Task
  Representation in Music Carnival of The Animals / Appraising Music / Composition Task 1
  Composing Music 1 How to Compose Music on GarageBand
  Composing Music 2 / Assessment Started How to Compose Music on GarageBand / Beginning Compsosition Assessment
  Composition Assessment Prep Composition Assessment based on Carnival of the Animals
  Composition Assessment  Composition Assessment based on Carnival of the Animals / Handing in Work
  5 Summer African Drumming Introduction to African Music Different African Instruments / Djembe Drums 1
  Drumming 1 Bass / Tone / Slap 
  Drumming 2  Performing a traditional african song with the use of call and response
  Drumming 3 Polyrhythms / Composing  Polyrhythms
  Drumming 4
  Drumming 5  Preparing for Drumming assessment
  Drumming 6 Performing an assessment / feedback
  6 Song Writing 1 Chord Sequences What is a chord / Major minor Chord Sequences / Playing in time with metronome
  Bass Lines Composing a bass line using the notes of the chords
  Melodies Composing a melody using the food method
  Drums Recognising different parts of the drum kit / composing a simple drum rhythm
  Lyrics How to write lyrics 
  Matching lyrics to melody
  Assessment  Bouncing song as an MP3 / Feedback
Year: 8 
  1 Autumn  The Ukulele Ukulele 1 Chords of C / G - Simple songs using the chords of C & G
  Ukulele 2 Chords of C / G / Am / F - Simple songs using the chords of C,G,Am & F
  Ukulele 3 Working as part of a group to perform a simple 4 chord song
  Ukulele 4  Performing a 4 chord song as part of a group
  Ukulele 5 Group Assessment Preparation
  Ukulele 6 Assessment Performance & Feedback
  2 Film Music Leitmotifs What is a Leitmotif / Recognising a Leitmotif / composing a leitmotif
  Music & Mood How music can change the mood of the action that is happening on screen 
  Sound Effects How film music composers use sound effects in movies
  Assessment Project Adding Music and Sound Effects to a movie clip
 
  Assessment Assessment and Feedback
  3 Spring The Keyboard 2 The Left Hand Recap Treble clef notation / Bass Clef Notation / Left hand keyboard task
  Sharps and Flats Where to find a sharp and flat note / Performing pieces using sharps and flats
  Assessment Preparation Fur Elise / Harry Potter Assessment preparation 
 
  Assessment begins Performing an assessment / feedback / pop song extension
  Assessment finished
  4 Programme Music How Music tells a story The Sorcers Apprentice
  Performing Programme Music Morning - Peer Gynt Suite
  Performance assessment
  Brief composition Composing a piece of music using a brief stimilus 
 
  Composition assessment Exporting composition and feedback
  5 Summer Blues Music 12 Bar Blues  Recap of what a chord is / Chords of 12 bar blues / 7th chords extension
  Bass Lines Recognising a walking bass / Performing a walking bass in time with chords
  Bishop Blues Performing a melody on top of 12 bar blues chords / composing using C blues scale
  Tidy up week Ensuring that all three parts of a blues song are completed and exported to hand in folder
  Improvisation How improvisation is used in blues music
  Improvisation performance
  6 Remixing Music Creating a remix What creates a good remix / choosing a song to remix / adding additional music
  Editing a track Cutting a track / copying a track / adding plug ins to track to change sound / Automation / Retriggering 
  Mash up of songs - Assessment Choosing two songs and putting the tracks together / Experimenting with plug ins
  Using Automation to enhance your track
  Mixing song and output levels 
  Assessment Bouncing song as an MP3 / Feedback

Year 9

Term 1

Unit 1

Ensemble Performing 1

 

  • To learn to play Pachelbel’s ‘Canon’
  • To develop individual performance skills
  • To perform individual musical lines within a group performance
  • To develop rehearsal skills
  • To develop knowledge of primary chords

 

Assessment – Ensemble performance recording

Unit 2

Music Technology

 

  • To develop basic keyboard skills
  • To use Midi Keyboards to play different instruments
  • To explore different sonorities and textures
  • To use Music Technology to enhance compositions and arrangements
  • To use GarageBand/Logic

 

Assessment – Remix assessment (Pachelbel’s ‘Canon’)

 

 

Year 9

Term 2

Unit 3

Music Theory

 

  • To learn to read notes on the treble Clef
  • To learn to read notes on the bass Clef
  • To learn to read different forms of notation
  • To learn different time signatures and recognise them aurally
  • To learn key signatures for the major keys up to four sharps and flats
  • To develop dictation skills, both rhythmic and melodic
  • To learn how to follow a score
  • To learn to identify key elements from the score

 

Assessment – Music Theory test & Score Reading exercise.

Unit 4

Instruments of the Orchestra

 

  • To learn to recognise the four families of instruments in the orchestra
  • To learn to recognise the individual instruments in the orchestra both visually and aurally
  • To learn about orchestral playing styles
  • To learn about the development of the orchestra from 1600-1900.
  • To learn about the role of the conductor
  • To learn the key features of the Baroque, Classical and Romantic periods of music
  • To be able to aurally identify music from different periods

 

Assessment – Listening Test

Unit 5

Ensemble Performing 2

 

  • To learn to perform ‘Africa’ by Toto
  • To develop rehearsal skills through group performance
  • To develop keyboard/singing/ukulele/guitar performance skills
  • To develop knowledge of chords and chord sequences
  • To learn the pop song structure

 

Assessment – Ensemble performance recording

Year 9

Term 3

Unit 6

Musical Elements

 

  • To learn to describe music using vocabulary of the elements of music
  • To learn the Italian terms and subject specific vocabulary related to the elements of music
  • To learn how to describe music using Italian terms and subject specific vocabulary
  • To develop listening skills and aural awareness

 

Assessment – Exam style listening test & compare contrast questions

Unit 7

Composing Music 1

 

  • To understanding the assessment criteria and requirements
  • To learn how to compose using different structures
  • To develop knowledge and use of harmony
  • To develop melodic writing

 

Assessment – 32 bar composition.

 

Year 10

Term 1

Unit 1

AoS 4 – Popular Music

  • To learn the origins, development, key composers, structures relating to Popular Music (AoS4)
  • To learn how the digital age has influenced popular music.
  • To learn how composers use instrumental techniques in popular music.
  • To learn about fusion music
  • To learn about different voice types.
  • To learn how to describe popular music using the Elements of Music.

 

Assessment – Pop music performance assessment, 32 bar pop composition & Listening test.

Unit 2

AoS4 – Prepared Extract

  • To learn how to analyse our first set work.
  • To learn how to apply the elements of music to analyse a piece of music
  • To learn how to answer exam style questions

 

Assessment – Listening Test for prepared extract & Elements Essay

Unit 3

Composing Music 2

  • To learn the GCSE Music Composing requirements.
  • To learn how to compose a melody to fit a chord sequence.
  • To learn how to develop a melody.
  • To learn how to compose music to a set brief.

 

Assessment – Melodic Composition to a given chord sequence to be handed in before Christmas.

Year 10

Term 2

Unit 4

AoS1 – Musical Forms & Devices

  • To learn the origins, development, key composers, structures relating to Western Classical Music.
  • To learn about the Baroque, Classical and Romantic eras of music.
  • To learn what a rhythmic and melodic device is
  • To learn how to recognise rhythmic and melodic devices through aural perception.
  • To consolidate learning of Key signatures
  • To consolidate learning of accompaniment styles and how they are used through Western Classical Music.

 

Assessment – Listening & Theory test.

Unit 5

Aos1 – Prepared Extract

  • To learn how to analyse our second set work.
  • To learn how to apply the elements of music to analyse a piece of music
  • To learn how to answer exam style questions

 

Assessment – Listening Test for prepared extract & Elements Essay

Unit 6

Composing Music 3

  • To consolidate learning of a chord sequence
  • To learn how to compose using different accompaniment styles.
  • To learn what a perfect and plagal cadence is an how to compose using these.
  • To learn how to recognise a perfect and plagal cadence through aural perception.
  • To consolidate learning of how to compose and develop a melody on top of an accompaniment.
  • To learn how to compose in sections to meet the requirements of GCSE Music.

 

Assessment – Composition to a brief to be handed in by May Half Term.

 

 

Year 10

Term 3

Unit 7

AoS 2 – Music for Ensemble

  • To learn the origins, development, key composers, structures relating to Music for Ensembles
  • To consolidate learning of Texture
  • To learn about different types of ensembles
  • To learn about Chamber Music, Musical Theatre, and Jazz & Blues music. 

 

Assessment – Performance Assessment & Listening Assessment.

Unit 8

Performing Music

  • To consolidate learning of ensemble performance and the GCSE requirements.
  • To learn how to perform with accuracy and expression both as a solo performer and an ensemble performer.

 

Assessment - Year 10 Performance Evening. Pupils must perform and record either a solo or ensemble performance.

 

 

Year 11

Term 1

Unit 1

AoS 3 – Film Music

  • To learn the origins, development, key composers, structures relating to Film Music.
  • To learn how composers, use leitmotifs and thematic transformation to develop thematic material.
  • To learn how composers, use the musical elements to interpret a given stimulus or commission.
  • To learn how sonority affects mood.
  • To learn how Music technology is used to enhance sonority.  
  • To learn how minimalistic techniques are used in film music.  

 

Assessment – Listening & Theory test.

Unit 2

Composing Music 4

  • To consolidate knowledge and understanding of GCSE Requirements
  • To consolidate learning of melodic and accompaniment development.
  • To learn about the set briefs set by the examination board.
  • To begin work on our brief composition.
  • To complete draft 1 of our free composition by Halloween.
  • To complete draft 1 of our brief composition by Christmas

 

Assessment – Draft 1 – Free & Brief Composition

Unit 3

Performing Music 4

  • To consolidate knowledge and understanding of GCSE Requirements
  • To consolidate learning of Ensemble Performance

 

Assessment – Ensemble Recording 1

Year 11

Term 2

Unit 4

Composing Music 5

  • To consolidate knowledge and understanding of GCSE Requirements
  • To learn how to adapt and develop compositions with teacher feedback

 

Assessment – Final Draft – Free & Brief Composition

Unit 5

Performing Music 5

  • To consolidate knowledge and understanding of GCSE Requirements
  • To consolidate learning of Ensemble Performance

 

Assessment – Final Recordings – Ensemble & Solo Performance

Unit 6

Revision 1

  • To consolidate knowledge and understanding of AoS1
  • To consolidate knowledge and understanding of AoS1 Set Works
  • To learn specific examination technique to answer exam questions

 

Assessment – Listening exam.

Year 11

Term 3

Unit 7

Revision 2

  • To consolidate knowledge and understanding of AoS2
  • To consolidate knowledge and understanding of AoS4
  • To consolidate knowledge and understanding of AoS4 Set Works
  • To learn specific examination technique to answer exam questions

 

Assessment – Listening exam

Unit 8

Revision 3

  • To consolidate knowledge and understanding of AoS3
  • To consolidate knowledge and understanding of both set works.

 

 

 

PE

PE

The aim of the PE Faculty at Bishop Challoner School is to promote physical activity that enables our students to progress physically, socially and academically.

 
We believe that PE is unique in its ability to develop positive character traits such as determination, discipline and team work.
 
As a Faculty we work tirelessly to provide opportunity for all our students to participate in competitive sport throughout the year that encourages commitment and endeavour to achieve excellence. We aim to compete at the highest level possible. Borough, county and national successes in football and athletics and various other sports are all testimony to the efforts of the staff, students and their families.

 

In Years 7-9 you will develop performance, thinking and analytical skills through a range of different sporting activities from the list below:

  • Badminton
  • Cricket
  • Swimming
  • Football
  • Hockey
  • Basketball
  • Trampoline
  • Fitness
  • Netball
  • Athletics
  • Table Tennis
  • Gymnastics
  • Rowing
  • Canoeing
  • Rock climbing
  • Handball
  • Rounders
  • Aerobics

Gain a theoretical underpinning of the following units of sport:

Year 7

Theory Term 1 Theory Term 2 Theory Term 3

Purpose of warm up and cool down

Phases of a warm up

Activities included in warm ups and cool downs

Name and location of muscles Name and location of bones

Year 8

Theory Term 1 Theory Term 2 Theory Term 3
Definitions of fitness, health, exercise and performance and the relationship between them

Components of fitness and the relative importance of these components in physical activity and sport: cardovascular fitness (aerobic endurance), stength, uscular endurance, flexibility, body composition, agility, balance, coordination, power, reaction time and speed 

Fitness tests for specific components of fitness: cardovascular fitness - Cooper 12 minute tests (run, swim), Harvard Step Test, strength - grip dynamometer, muscular endurance - one-minute sit-up, one-minute press-up, speed - 30m sprint, power - vertical jump, flexibility - sit and reach
Unit Term Topic Theme Lesson Content
Year: 7 
  1 Autumn Invasion Games Netball  passing and core task
  footwork
  attacking skills
  defensive skills
  positional play
  Netball match play and rules
  tactics, match play and core task
  2 Autumn Football passing, dribbling and core task
  first touch and shooting
  attacking skills
  defensive skills
  positional play
  game play and rules
  tactics, game play and core task
  3 Spring Net Wall Games Badminton Grip and Serve, core task 
  Clears
  Net shot and drop shot
  push, flick, whip
  Smash
  Umpire and match play, core task 
  4 Gymnastics Trampolining shapes, twists, seat landing
  swivel hips
  front landing
  back landing
  shaped landings
  routines
  5 Summer Performing at maximum levels Athletics Middle distance
  sprint
  jump
  throw
  hurdle
  relay changeover 
  7 Invasion Games Basketball passing, dribbling, core task
  lay up
  set shot, jump shot
  attacking skills
  defensive skills
  match play, rules and core task 
Year: 8 
  1 Autumn Invasion Games Netball  passing and core task
  footwork
  attacking skills
  defensive skills
  positional play
  match play and rules
  tactics, match play and core task
  2 Football passing, dribbling and core task
  first touch and shooting
  attacking skills
  defensive skills
  positional play
  game play and rules
  tactics, game play and core task
  3 Spring Net Wall Games Badminton Grip and Serve, core task 
  Clears
  Net shot and drop shot
  push, flick, whip
  Smash
  Umpire and match play, core task 
  4 Gymnastics Trampolining shapes, twists, seat landing
  swivel hips
  front landing
  back landing
  shaped landings
  routines
  5 Summer Performing at maximum levels Athletics Middle distance
  sprint
  jump
  throw
  hurdle
  relay changeover 
  7 Invasion Games Basketball passing, dribbling, core task
  lay up
  set shot, jump shot
  attacking skills
  defensive skills
  match play, rules and core task 
  8 Striking and fielding Cricket throw, catch and core task
  bowl
  batting stance, technique and grip
  play a variety of shots
  Fielding techniques
  match play and rules
  match play and core task
  9 Invasion Games Handball  pass, catch and core task
  dribble and 3 steps 
  shooting
  attacking skills
  defensive skills
  goalkeeping
  rules, match play, tactics and core task

Year 9

Muscular-skeletal system

Functions of skeletal system.

Understand classification of bones.

Recall location of bones

Recall location of muscles

Understand antagonistic pairs
 

Cardio-respiratory system

Functions of Cardiovascular system

Structure of the system

Location and components of Respiratory system
 

What You Will Study at GCSE/BTEC

 

BTEC

Over the 2 years you will study 4 units of work which are:

Health and Fitness for Sport and Exercise

Practical Sports

Training for personal Fitness

Leading Sports Activities
 

Activities

Various sporting activities such as: Football, Fitness, Badminton, Athletics, Basketball, Netball, Trampoline.

Fitness testing.

Leading coaching sessions.

Officiating in games. 

Controlled Assessment

  • Observed performing in different sporting activities that is internally assessed.
  • Observed leading different sports activities which are internally assessed.
  • Observed officiating in different sporting activities which are internally assessed.

Examination

“The unit 1 fitness for sport and exercise is assessed by an onscreen test. It is 1 hour and fifteen minutes long and assessed out of 60 marks”

GCSE

In sport science you will study the following:

In your theory lessons you will focus on “Fitness and Body Systems” including Applied anatomy and physiology, Movement analysis, Physical training and the use of data. Also “Health and Performance” which includes Health, fitness and well-being, Sport psychology, Socio-cultural influences. 

During your double lessons you will take part in various sporting activities ranging from Football, Badminton, Rowing, Climbing, Athletics, Basketball, Netball and Trampoline.

70% theory

Written paper Fitness and Body Systems 1 hr 45 mins

Written paper Health and Performance 1 hr 15

Personal Exercise Programme (PEP)

30% practical

Practical performance – 3 sports

 

NB School PE lessons and sports fixtures are often offsite. Please contact the PE Staff via reception for more details. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year 10

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

PEP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cardiovascular System

To Independently design a 6-week personal training programme to develop weakness in sporting performance

 

To successfully implement a 6-week personal training programme, logging all repetitions and summarising adaptations to each session

 

To review the effectiveness of a personal training programme by comparing pre and post results, evaluating current performance and providing recommendations for the future.

 

To know the functions of the cardiovascular system and can apply knowledge to performance in physical activities.

 

To know the structure of the cardiovascular system and each component’s role in maintaining blood circulation during performance in physical activity and sport.

 

To know the structure of arteries, capillaries and veins and how their structure relates to their function and importance during physical activity and sport.

 

To understand the mechanisms required and the need for redistribution of blood flow during physical activities compared to when resting.

 

To know the function and importance of red and white blood cells, platelets and plasma for physical activity and sport.

Term 2

Respiratory System

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Movement Analysis

To know the composition of inhaled and exhaled air and the impact of physical activity and sport on this composition.

 

To explore the lung volumes including vital capacity, tidal volume and minute ventilation. To identify changes to lung volumes due to physical activity and sport

 

To identify the location of the main components of the respiratory system and know their role in movement of oxygen and carbon dioxide into and out of the body.

 

To understand how the cardiovascular and respiratory systems work together to allow participation in physical activity and sport.

 

To identify first, second and third class levers and their use in physical activity and sport.

 

To understand the mechanical advantage and disadvantage of the body’s lever systems and the impact on sporting performance.

 

To explore the movement patterns using body planes and axes applied to physical activities and sporting action.

Term 3

Health, Fitness and Wellbeing

 

To understand physical, emotional and social health and how participation in physical activity and sport can improve health and how these benefits are achieved.

 

To explore the impact of fitness on well-being and the associated long term health disorders

To explore lifestyle choices in relation to: Diet, activity level, work/rest/sleep balance, and recreational drugs.

 

To explore sedentary lifestyles and the associated consequences.

 

To know the nutritional requirements and ratio of Macronutrients for a balanced diet in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle and optimise performance in physical activity and sport.

 

To know the role and importance of micronutrients, water and fibre for performers/players in physical activities and sports activities and sports, carbohydrate loading for endurance athletes, and timing of protein intake for power athletes.

 

To explore the factors that affect a person's optimum weight.

 

To understand the variation in optimum weight according to roles in specific physical activities and sports.

 

To know the correct energy balance to maintain a healthy weight.

I understand the requirements of hydration for physical activity and sport.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year 11

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Sports Psychology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Socio Cultural Issues

 

To understand the classification of a range of sport's skills using the open-closed, basic (simple)-complex, and low organisation-high organisation continua.

 

To explore practice structures including massed, distributed, fixed and variable.

 

To explore the different types of guidance to optimise performance.

 

To understand the use of goal setting to improve and/or optimise performance.

 

To understand the different types of feedback to optimise performance.

 

To explore mental preparation for performance.

 

To explore participation rates in physical activity and sports and the impact on participation rates considering the following personal factors: Gender, age, socio-economic group, ethnicity, disability.

 

To understand the relationship between commercialisation, the media and sport.

To explore the advantages and disadvantages of commercialisation and the media for: The sponsor, the sport, the player/performer, the spectator.

 

To understand the different types of sporting behaviour and the reasons for, and consequences of, deviance at elite level.

Term 2

Revision

Exam Technique

To diagnose misunderstanding (areas of development) within the GCSE PE specification using the PLC

 

To address misunderstanding using therapy revision methods

 

To assess the effectiveness of therapy revision using exam style questions

 

To review misunderstanding through use of PLC

 

To develop exam strategies to deal effectively with Explain (using an example) command words

 

To develop exam strategies to deal effectively with Assess command words

 

To develop exam strategies to deal effectively with Analyse command words

 

 

To develop exam strategies to deal effectively with Examine command words

 

To develop exam strategies to deal effectively with Discuss command words

 

To develop exam strategies to deal effectively with Evaluate command words

Physics

Year 9

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

P1: Matter

P1.1 particle model

Describe how and why the atomic model has changed over time

Describe the structure of the atom and discuss the charges and relative sizes of the particles

State the typical size (order of magnitude) of atoms and small molecules

Define density

Explain the differences in density between the different states of matter in terms of the arrangements of the atoms and molecules

Apply the relationship between density, mass and volume to changes where mass is conserved

P1: Matter

P1.2 Changes of state

Describe how mass is conserved when substances melt, freeze, evaporate, condense or sublimate

State that physical changes differ from chemical changes because the material recovers its original properties if the change is reversed

Describe how heating a system will change the energy stored within the system and raise its temperature or produce changes of state

Define the term specific heat capacity and distinguish between it and the term specific latent heat

Apply the relationship between change in internal energy of a material and its mass, specific heat capacity and temperature change to calculate the energy change involved

Apply the relationship between specific latent heat and mass to calculate the energy change involved in a change of state 

P1: Matter

P1.3 pressure

Explain how the motion of the molecules in a gas is related both to its temperature and its pressure

Explain the relationship between the temperature of a gas and its pressure at constant volume (qual only)

Recall that gases can be compressed or expanded by pressure changes and that the pressure produces a net force at right angles to any surface

: Explain how increasing the volume in which a gas is contained, at constant temperature can lead to a decrease in pressure

HT ONLY: Explain how work done on a gas can lead to an increase in its temperature

Describe a simple model of the Earth's atmosphere and of atmospheric pressure

Explain why atmospheric pressure varies with height above the surface of the planet

HT ONLY: Describe the factors which influence floating and sinking

HT ONLY: Explain why pressure in a liquid varies with depth and density and how this leads to an upwards force on a partially submerged object

HT ONLY: Calculate differences in pressure at different depths in a liquid

P5: Waves in Matter

 P5.1: Wave behaviour

Describe wave motion in terms of amplitude, wavelength, frequency and period

Define wavelength and frequency

Describe and apply the relationship between these and the wave velocity

Apply formulae relating velocity, frequency and wavelength

Describe differences between transverse and longitudinal waves

Explain how changes, in velocity, frequency and wavelength, in transmission of sound waves from one medium to another, are inter-related

PHY ONLY: Describe the effects of reflection, transmission, and absorption of waves at material interface

PHY & HT ONLY: Describe, with examples, processes which convert wave disturbances between sound waves and vibrations in solids

PHY & HT ONLY: Explain why such processes only work over a limited frequency range, and the relevance of this to human hearing

Describe how ripples on water surfaces are used to model transverse waves whilst sound waves in air are longitudinal waves, and how the speed of each may be measured

Describe evidence that in both cases it is the wave and not the water or air itself that travels

 

P5: Waves in Matter

P5.2 Electromagnetic spectrum

Recall that electromagnetic waves are transverse and are transmitted through space where all have the same velocity

Explain that electromagnetic waves transfer energy from source to absorber

Apply the relationships between frequency and wavelength across the electromagnetic spectrum

Describe the main groupings of the electromagnetic spectrum and that these groupings range from long to short wavelengths and from low to high frequencies

Describe that our eyes can only detect a limited range of the electromagnetic spectrum

Recall that light is an electromagnetic wave

State examples of some practical uses of electromagnetic waves in the radio, micro-wave, infra-red, visible, ultra-violet, X-ray and gamma-ray regions

Describe how ultra-violet waves, X-rays and gamma-rays can have hazardous effects, notably on human bodily tissues

PHY & HT ONLY: Explain how the differences in velocity, absorption and reflection between different types of waves in solids and liquids can be used both for detection and for exploration of structures

HT ONLY: Recall that radio waves can be produced by, or can themselves induce, oscillations in electrical circuits

 

P5: Waves in Matter

P5.3 wave interactions

HT ONLY: Recall that different substances may absorb, transmit, refract, or reflect electromagnetic waves in ways that vary with wavelength

HT ONLY: Explain how some effects are related to differences in the velocity of electromagnetic waves in different substances

Use ray diagrams to illustrate reflection, refraction and the similarities and differences between convex and concave lenses

Recall how to construct two-dimensional ray diagrams to illustrate reflection and refraction

 Explain how colour is related to differential absorption, transmission and reflection

Term 2

P6: Radioactivity

P6.1 radioactive emission

Recall that atomic nuclei are composed of both protons and neutrons, that the nucleus of each element has a characteristic positive charge

Recall that atoms of the same elements can differ in nuclear mass by having different numbers of neutrons

Use the conventional representation for nuclei to relate the differences between isotopes

Recall that some nuclei are unstable and may emit alpha particles, beta particles, or neutrons, and electromagnetic radiation as gamma rays

Relate these emissions to possible changes in the mass or the charge of the nucleus, or both

Recall how to use names and symbols of common nuclei and particles to write balanced equations that represent radioactive decay

Recall how to balance equations representing the emission of alpha-, beta- or gamma-radiation in terms of the masses, and charges of the atoms involved

Recall that in each atom its electrons are arranged at different distances from the nucleus and that such arrangements may change with absorption or emission of electromagnetic radiation

Recall that atoms can become ions by loss of outer electrons

Recall that changes in atoms and nuclei can also generate and absorb radiations over a wide frequency range

Explain the concept of half-life and how this is related to the random nature of radioactive decay

HT ONLY: Recall how to calculate the net decline, expressed as a ratio, during radioactive emission after a given (integral) number of half-lives

Recall the differences in the penetration properties of alpha-particles, beta-particles and gamma-rays

P6: Radioactivity

P6.2: Uses and Hazards

Recall the differences between contamination and irradiation effects and compare the hazards associated with these two

Explain why the hazards associated with radioactive material differ according to the half-life involved

Describe the different uses of nuclear radiations for exploration of internal organs, and for control or destruction of unwanted tissue

Recall that some nuclei are unstable and may split, and relate such effects to radiation which might emerge, to transfer of energy to other particles and to the possibility of chain reactions

Describe the process of nuclear fusion

Term 3

P8 Global challenges:

P8.3: Powering the earth

PHY ONLY: Explain the red-shift of light from galaxies that are receding, and how this red-shift changes with the distance of the galaxy from Earth

Explain how red shift and other evidence can be linked to the Big-Bang model

: Recall that our Sun was formed from dust and gas drawn together by gravity and explain how this caused fusion reactions

Explain that all bodies emit radiation, and that the intensity and wavelength distribution of any emission depends on the temperature of the body

Recall the main features of our solar system, including the similarities and distinctions between the planets, their moons, and artificial satellites

HT ONLY: Explain that, for circular orbits, the force of gravity leads to a constantly changing velocity but unchanged speed

HT ONLY: Explain that, for a stable orbit, the radius must change if the speed changes

 HT ONLY: Explain, using everyday examples, how the temperature of a body is related to the balance between incoming radiation absorbed and radiation emitted

HT ONLY: Explain how the differences in velocity, absorption and reflection between different types of waves in solids and liquids can be used both for detection and exploration

 

P8 Global challenges P8..2poweing the earth

Describe the main energy sources available for use on Earth, compare the ways in which they are used and distinguish between renewable and non-renewable sources

Explain patterns and trends in the use of energy resources

Recall that, in the national grid, electrical power is transferred at high voltages from power stations, and then transferred at lower voltages in each locality for domestic use

Describe how step-up and step-down transformers are used to change the potential difference as power is transferred from power stations

Explain how the national grid is an efficient way to transfer energy

: Use simple calculations to link the potential differences and numbers of turns of a transformer to the power transfer involved, and relate this to the advantages of power transmission at high voltages

Recall that the domestic supply in the UK is a.c. At 50Hz and about 230 volts

Explain the difference between direct and alternating voltage

Recall the differences in function between the live, neutral and earth mains wires, and the potential differences between these wires

Explain that a live wire may be dangerous even when a switch in the mains circuit is open, by explaining the danger of providing any connection between the live wire and earth

 

P8 Global challenges

P8.1 driving safely

Recall typical speeds encountered in everyday experience for wind and sound, and for walking, running, cycling and other transportation systems

Estimate the magnitudes of everyday accelerations

Recall how to make calculations using ratios and proportional reasoning to convert units and to compute rates

Explain methods of measuring human reaction times and recall typical results

Explain the factors which affect the distance required for road transport vehicles to come to rest in emergencies and the implications for safety

Estimate how the distances required for road vehicles to stop in an emergency, varies over a range of typical speeds

Explain the dangers caused by large decelerations

Estimate the forces involved in typical situations on a public road

PHY ONLY: Estimate, for everyday road transport, the speed, accelerations and forces involved in large accelerations

 

Year 10

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

P3: Electricity:

 P3.1 Static Electricity

Describe that charge is a property of all matter, that there are positive and negative charges, and that the effects of charges are not seen inc how they cancel each other out

Describe the production of static electricity, and sparking, by the rubbing of insulating surfaces

Describe evidence that charged objects exert forces of attraction or repulsion on one another when not in contact

Explain how transfer of electrons between objects can explain the phenomena of static electricity

PHY ONLY: Explain the concept of an electric field and how it helps to explain the phenomena of static electricity

Recall that current is a rate of flow of charge (electrons) and the conditions needed for charge to flow

Recall that current has the same value at any point in a single closed loop

Recall and use the relationship between quantity of charge, current and time

P3: Electricity:

 P3.2: Simple Circuits

Describe the differences between series and parallel circuits

Recall how to represent d.c. circuits with the conventions of positive and negative terminals, and the symbols that represent common circuit elements

Recall that current depends on both resistance and potential difference and the units in which these are measured

Recall and apply the relationship between I, R and V, and that for some resistors the value of R remains constant but that in others it can change as the current changes

Explain that for some resistors the value of R remains constant but that in others it can change as the current changes

Explain the design and use of circuits to explore such effects

Recall how to use graphs to explore whether circuit elements are linear or non-linear

Recall how to use graphs and relate the curves produced to the function and properties of circuit elements

Explain why, if two resistors are in series the net resistance is increased, whereas with two in parallel the net resistance is decreased

Recall how to calculate the currents, potential differences and resistances in d.c. series and parallel circuits

Explain the design and use of such circuits for measurement and testing purposes

Explain how the power transfer in any circuit device is related to the potential difference across it and the current, and to the energy changes over a given time

Apply the equations relating potential difference, current, quantity of charge, resistance, power, energy, and time, and solve problems for circuits

Term 2

P4: Magnetism

Describe the attraction and repulsion between unlike and like poles for permanent magnets

Describe the difference between permanent and induced magnets

Describe the characteristics of the magnetic field of a magnet, showing how strength and direction change from one point to another

Explain how the behaviour of a magnetic compass is related to evidence that the core of the Earth must be magnetic

Describe how to show that a current can create a magnetic effect and describe the directions of the magnetic field around a conducting wire

Recall that the strength of the field depends on the current and the distance from the conductor

Explain how solenoid arrangements can enhance the magnetic effect

HT ONLY: Describe how a magnet and a current-carrying conductor exert a force on one another

HT ONLY: Recall how to show that Fleming’s left-hand rule represents the relative orientations of the force, the current and the magnetic field

HT ONLY: Apply the equation that links the force on a conductor to the magnetic flux density, the current and the length of conductor to calculate the forces involved

HT ONLY: Explain how the force exerted from a magnet and a current-carrying conductor is used to cause rotation in electric motors

Recall that a change in the magnetic field around a conductor can give rise to an induced potential difference across its ends, generating a magnetic field that would oppose the original change

Explain how this effect is used in an alternator to generate a.c., and in a dynamo to generate d.c.

Explain how the effect of an alternating current in one circuit, in inducing a current in another, is used in transformers

Explain how the ratio of the potential differences across the two coils depends on the ratio of the number of turns on each, and so distinguish a step-up from a step-down transformer

: Apply the equation linking the potential differences and number of turns in the two coils of a transformer

Explain the action of the microphone in converting the pressure variations in sound waves into variations in current in electrical circuits and reverse for loudspeakers and headphones

P2: Forces:

P2.1: Motion

Describe how to measure distance and time in a range of scenarios

Describe how to measure distance and time and use these to calculate speed

Recall how to make calculations using ratios and proportional reasoning to convert units and to compute rates

Explain the vector–scalar distinction as it applies to displacement and distance, velocity and speed

Relate changes and differences in motion to appropriate distance-time, and velocity-time graphs; interpret lines and slopes

Recall how to interpret enclosed area in velocity-time graphs

Recall how to calculate average speed for non-uniform motion

Recall how to apply formulae relating distance, time and speed, for uniform motion, and for motion with uniform acceleration

Term 3

P2: Forces:

P2.2: Newton’s Law

Recall examples of ways in which objects interact and describe how such examples involve interactions between pairs of objects which produce a force on each object

Recall how to represent such forces as vectors

Recall and apply Newton’s First Law to explain the motion of an object moving with uniform velocity and also an object where the speed and/or direction change

HT ONLY: Recall how to use vector diagrams to illustrate resolution of forces, a net force (resultant force), and equilibrium situations

HT ONLY: Describe examples of the forces acting on an isolated solid object or system

HT ONLY: Describe, using free body diagrams, examples where two or more forces lead to a resultant force on an object

HT ONLY: Describe, using free body diagrams, examples of the special case where forces balance to produce a resultant force of zero (qualitative only)

Recall and apply Newton’s second law in calculations relating forces, masses and accelerations

HT ONLY: Explain that inertia is a measure of how difficult it is to change the velocity of an object and that the mass is defined as the ratio of force over acceleration

HT ONLY: Define momentum and describe examples of momentum in collisions

PHY ONLY: Apply formulae relating force, mass, velocity and acceleration to explain how the changes involved are inter-related

Recall how to use the relationship between work done, force, and distance moved along the line of action of the force and describe the energy transfer involved

Calculate relevant values of stored energy and energy transfers; convert between newton-metres and joules

Explain, with reference to examples, the definition of power as the rate at which energy is transferred

Recall and apply Newton’s third law

HT ONLY: Explain why an object moving in a circle with a constant speed has a changing velocity (qualitative only)

P2: Forces:

 P2.3: Forces and Acceleration

Explain that to stretch, bend or compress an object, more than one force has to be applied

Describe the difference between elastic and plastic deformation caused by stretching forces

Describe the relationship between force and extension for a spring and other simple systems

Describe the difference between linear and non-linear relationships between force and extension

Recall how to calculate a spring constant in linear cases

Recall how to calculate the work done in stretching

Describe that all matter has a gravitational field that causes attraction, and the field strength is much greater for massive objects

Define weight and describe how it is measured

Describe the relationship between the weight of an object and the gravitational field strength (g) (and) has a value of 10N/kg at the Earth’s surface

Recall the acceleration in free fall

Apply formulae relating force, mass and relevant physical constants, including gravitational field strength (g), to explore how changes in these are inter-related

 Describe examples in which forces cause rotation

Define and calculate the moment of the force in such examples

Explain how levers and gears transmit the rotational effects of forces

Recall that the pressure in fluids (gases and liquids) causes a net force at right angles to any surface

Recall how to use the relationship between the force, the pressure and the area in contact

 

Year 11

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

P7: Energy:

 P7.1 Work Done

Describe that, in situations where there are energy transfers in a system, there is no net change to the total energy of a closed system

Describe all the changes involved in the way energy is stored when a system changes for common situations

Describe the changes in energy involved when a system is changed by heating, by work done by forces, and by work done when a current flows

Recall how to make calculations of the energy changes associated with changes in a system, recalling or selecting the relevant equations for mechanical, electrical, and thermal processes

Calculate the amounts of energy associated with a moving body, a stretched spring and an object raised above ground level

P7: Energy:

 P7.2 Power and Efficiency

Describe, with examples, the process by which energy is dissipated, so that it is stored in less useful ways

Describe how, in different domestic devices, energy is transferred from batteries or the a.c. from the mains

Describe, with examples, the power ratings for domestic electrical appliances and how these are linked to the changes in stored energy when they are in use

Calculate energy efficiency for any energy transfer

HT ONLY: Describe ways to increase efficiency

Explain ways of reducing unwanted energy transfer

Describe how the rate of cooling of a building is affected by the thickness and thermal conductivity of its walls

Term 2

Exam revision

 

 

 

RE

RE

Religious Education is the core of the curriculum and provides a sound introduction to Roman Catholic teachings and the Gospel values of truth, justice, equality, forgiveness, peace and love. Throughout the key stages students study a variety of topics that enables them to develop their understanding of the Catholic faith and recognise the seeds of truth in other faith traditions. They gain understanding of what it means to be ‘People of God’ and the importance of faith in action.

In year 7 students begin with an introduction to the Catholic faith, which includes religious practices and prayer life. Students also study how to be holy and explore beliefs about judgement and the afterlife. In year 8 students learn about God's revelation, the nature of grace and the 7 Sacraments.

Throughout Key Stage 3 students study ethical topics such as Global Issues, in which they reflect on their impact on the world around them and the importance of stewardship.

Students are also given the opportunity to explore other faith traditions with a particular focus on Islam, Sikhism and Judaism

Year 7

  • Introduction to RE: Students learn the essential parts of the Catholic faith. Particularly focusing on the role of the Bible and its importance to Catholic life.
  • Catholic Beliefs and Values: Students continue to learn the key aspects of the Catholic faith, focusing on the nature of God. We look at how these beliefs impact Catholic practice today.
  • Global Issues: Students learn about Jesus’ teachings and how they are being lived out by Catholics today. Students have an opportunity to reflect on key issues impacting our world today, such as poverty, war, and intolerance.
  • Covenants: Students learn about the term covenant and key promises that were made in Jewish history. Furthermore, students have an opportunity to reflect on Holy Week alongside a focus on artwork surrounding this important time.
  • Marks Gospel: Students learn the background to the Gospel of Mark and how this impacts our understanding of Jesus’ role today.
  • Islam: Students study some of the key beliefs and practices of Islam, focusing on the importance of the Five Pillars of Islam.

 

Year 8

  • Divine Revelation and Incarnation: We explore how God has revealed himself to us, using the Bible to understand the role of the prophets. We then focus on the most important revelation of God; Jesus, and his role in our Salvation.
  • Grace: In this unit, we discuss the importance of grace in our life and think about the key terms sanctifying and sacramental grace. We reflect on key parts of the Christian life, such as baptism.
  • Ethics – Marriage and Family Life: Here, we have an opportunity to investigate a key issue in our world today. We look at issues, such as marriage, the family, adoption, and divorce.
  • Sacrifice and Death: This unit is focussing on the sacrifice and death of Jesus Christ, particularly analysing how it is expressed in Mark’s Gospel. This unit leads up to Easter as we think about the importance of his death for Christians today.
  • Judgement and Afterlife: We take a closer look at the topic of death in this unit, looking at what Scripture has to say about death. We evaluate the implications of purgatory, heaven, and hell, on our lives today.
  • Sikhism: We introduce the topic of Sikhism, exploring different key teachings through the lens of the 10 Gurus. We reflect on their practices and evaluate whether these key beliefs are still relevant today.
Unit Term Topic Theme
Year: 7 
  1 Autumn 1 Introduction to RE Introduction to RE
  The Bible 
  Old and New Testament 
  Midterm 
  The God of Christianity 
  Christian Worship and prayer 
  Visit to St. Mary's and St. Michael's Church
  Holy Orders and the Religious Life
  End of Unit assessment 
  2 Autumn 2 Beliefs and Values Introduction /God as Father and Creator
  God as Son
  God as Holy Spirit and the Church 
  Midterm 
  Mary the Mother of God
  The Rosary 
  Bishop Challoner/ Form Patrons 
  End of Unit assessment 
  3 Spring 1 Global issues Introduction and Catholic Social Teaching 
  Poverty and The Christian response
  CaFOD and Charity 
  Midterm 
  Fairtrade
   Violence and War
  Just War and Wepons of Mass Destruction
  End of Unit assessment 
  4 Spring 2 Covenants Introduction 
  Moses and the Passover
  Ten Commandments and First Two Commandments
  Commandments 3,4,5,6
  Commandments 7,8,9,10
  Midterm 
  New Covenent and New Commandment 
  Holy Week: Palm Sunday & Last Supper 
  Holy Week: Good Friday and Easter Sunday
  End of Unit Assement 
  5 Summer 1 Mark's Gospel Introduction and Purpose
  The Beginning of Jesus' Mission
  The Cost of Discipleship and the Feeding of the 50
  Jesus and the Authorities 
  Outcasts and the Sick
  Midterm 
  Jesus reveals his identidy to the 12
  Jesus The Messiah : Son of God and Son of Man
  End of unit Assessment 
  6 Summer 2 Islam Introduction & Beliefs about God in Islam 
  The Life of Mohammed & the Quran 
  First and Second Pillar of Islam
  Third and Fourth Pillar of Islam 
  Fifth Pillar of Islam
  Islamic Art
  Presentation preparation
  Presentations
  End of unit Assesment 
  1 Autumn 1 Introduction to RE Introduction to RE
  The Bible 
  Old and New Testament 
  Midterm 
  The God of Christianity 
  Christian Worship and prayer 
  Visit to St. Mary's and St. Michael's Church
  Holy Orders and the Religious Life
  End of Unit assessment 
  2 Autumn 2 Beliefs and Values Introduction /God as Father and Creator
  God as Son
  God as Holy Spirit and the Church 
  Midterm 
  Mary the Mother of God
  The Rosary 
  Bishop Challoner/ Form Patrons 
  End of Unit assessment 
  3 Spring 1 Global issues Introduction and Catholic Social Teaching 
  Poverty and The Christian response
  CaFOD and Charity 
  Midterm 
  Fairtrade
   Violence and War
  Just War and Wepons of Mass Destruction
  End of Unit assessment 
  4 Spring 2 Covenants Introduction 
  Moses and the Passover
  Ten Commandments and First Two Commandments
  Commandments 3,4,5,6
  Commandments 7,8,9,10
  Midterm 
  New Covenent and New Commandment 
  Holy Week: Palm Sunday & Last Supper 
  Holy Week: Good Friday and Easter Sunday
  End of Unit Assement 
  5 Summer 1 Mark's Gospel Introduction and Purpose
  The Beginning of Jesus' Mission
  The Cost of Discipleship and the Feeding of the 50
  Jesus and the Authorities 
  Outcasts and the Sick
  Midterm 
  Jesus reveals his identidy to the 12
  Jesus The Messiah : Son of God and Son of Man
  End of unit Assessment 
  6 Summer 2 Islam Introduction & Beliefs about God in Islam 
  The Life of Mohammed & the Quran 
  First and Second Pillar of Islam
  Third and Fourth Pillar of Islam 
  Fifth Pillar of Islam
  Islamic Art
  Presentation preparation
  Presentations
  End of unit Assesment 
Year: 8 
  7 Autumn 1  Revelation Introduction and Creation
  Humanity and Orignal Sin
  Revelation to the Patriarchs
  Midterm Assessment
  Revelation to the Prophets
  Jesus: God Revealed
  Nature of Jesus
  Jesus' Redeeming Sacrafice
  End of Unit Assessment
  8 Autumn 2 Grace Introduction and Why We Need Grace 
  Theological Virtues and Cardinal Virtues
  Moral Virtues and Midterm
  Sacraments and Baptism 
  Eucharist and Confirmation
  Reconciliation and Annointing of the Sick
  Marriage and Holy Orders
  End of Unit Assessment 
  9 Spring 1 Marriage Introduction and Marriage in the Bible
  The Rite of Marriage in the Catholic Church 
  Family Life 
  Midterm Assessment
  Marital breakdown and Divorce
  Divorce and Remarriage 
  Adoption and fostering
  End of Unit Assessment
  10 Spring 2 Sacrafice and Death Introduction to Holy Week and the Entry into Jerus
  Jesus' Anointing and the Betrayal by Judas
  Sacrifice and Death The Last Supper and the Agony in the Garden
  Jesus' Arrest and Trial 
  Crucifixion, Death and Burial, 
  Resurrection and Ascension 
  End of Unit Assessment 
  11 Summer 1 Judgement and the Afterlife Introduction and the cause of death 
  Death in the New Testament 
  Preparing for Death 
  Requiem Mass and Christian mourning Rituals 
  7 Autumn 1  Revelation Introduction and Creation
  Humanity and Orignal Sin
  Revelation to the Patriarchs
  Midterm Assessment
  Revelation to the Prophets
  Jesus: God Revealed
  Nature of Jesus
  Jesus' Redeeming Sacrafice
  End of Unit Assessment
  8 Autumn 2 Grace Introduction and Why We Need Grace 
  Theological Virtues and Cardinal Virtues
  Moral Virtues and Midterm
  Sacraments and Baptism 
  Eucharist and Confirmation
  Reconciliation and Annointing of the Sick
  Marriage and Holy Orders
  End of Unit Assessment 
  9 Spring 1 Marriage Introduction and Marriage in the Bible
  The Rite of Marriage in the Catholic Church 
  Family Life 
  Midterm Assessment
  Marital breakdown and Divorce
  Divorce and Remarriage 
  Adoption and fostering
  End of Unit Assessment
  10 Spring 2 Sacrafice and Death Introduction to Holy Week and the Entry into Jerus
  Jesus' Anointing and the Betrayal by Judas
  Sacrifice and Death The Last Supper and the Agony in the Garden
  Jesus' Arrest and Trial 
  Crucifixion, Death and Burial, 
  Resurrection and Ascension 
  End of Unit Assessment 
  11 Summer 1 Judgement and the Afterlife Introduction and the cause of death 
  Death in the New Testament 
  Preparing for Death 
  Requiem Mass and Christian mourning Rituals 

Key Stage 4

What You Will Study at GCSE

Year 9

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Introduction to Judaism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction to Catholic Christianity

  • To understand the nature and content of the RE GCSE
  • To explore the foundations of Judaism and the belief that God is One 
  • To learn different key writings with the Tenakh and its formation
  • To analyse key titles of God as creator and sustainer found in Genesis
  • To evaluate the important of the titles of God as Law-giver, Judge and Redeemer
  • To identify the qualities of the Messiah
  • To contrast the similarities and differences between Christian and Jewish ideas of the Messiah
  • To explore the Covenants with Abraham and their importance of Jewish communities today
  • To investigate the Covenant with Moses and importance of the 10 commandments today
  • To develop an understanding of the key features of a Synagogue

 

  • To understand the way God reveals Himself to us through the Bible
  • To know the meaning of the Incarnation and its impact for Christians today
  • To analyse the ethical teachings of Jesus in terms of how we treat others and the Kingdom of God
  • To identify the role and importance of the Magisterium
  • To understand the central role of the Pope as Head of the Church
  • To explain the importance of the Holy Spirit in our lives and the wider Church
  • To explore Catholic beliefs of sin and salvation and their impact on the Church today
  • To use Annibale Carracci’s ‘Image of a Fiery Purgatory’ to explore Catholic beliefs concerning the afterlife
  • To know various forms of prayer and worship, including drama and music
  • To identify the main features of the Church and how they help Catholics worship

 

Term 2

Unit 1: Creation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit 2: Incarnation

  • To understand the meaning and significance of Michelangelo’s Creation of Adam as it reflects Catholics beliefs about creation and humanity
  • To compare Michelangelo’s Creation of Adam to another Christian artistic expression of creation
  • To explore how the nature of God as creator, transcendent and omnipotent is expressed through Genesis 1 and 2
  • To evaluate the importance of human beings as made in the image of God and how this influences free will, dignity, sanctity of life and stewardship
  • To examine the origins of the Bible and its structure and form
  • To understand how different people interpret the Bible as the Word of God and how this relates to interpretations of Genesis
  • To know Natural Law and how it influences Catholic views on sanctity of life
  • To evaluate the influence of Second Vatican Council on the relationship between religion and science with reference to Gaudium et Spes 36
  • To apply understanding of ‘love your neighbour’ to stewardship locally, nationally and globally
  • To explore how CAFOD’s work on sustainability expresses Catholic beliefs about the goodness of creation

 

  • To understand the significance of Christian symbols such as the Ichtus, the Alpha and Omega and the Chi-Rho 
  • To analyse how belief in the Incarnation influences use of religious art and imagery
  • To explore different sculptures of Jesus and their significance for Catholics today
  • To use the Incarnation accounts to explore beliefs in Jesus as Son and divine Word
  • To examine different titles for Jesus such as ‘Son of Man’ and ‘Son of God’
  • To explain how Jesus is a source of moral teaching using the Beatitudes and the Parable of the Sheep and the Goats
  • To understand the meaning and significance of the writings of Irenaeus in terms of the nature of Jesus
  • To compare and contrast the presentations of the Incarnation in Dei Verbum 4 and Verbum Domini 12
  • To analyse how grace and the Sacraments show the holiness of life
  • To know the importance of imago dei for protecting the unborn

Term 3

Unit 3

  • To understand the influence of different styles of worship such as psalms, plainchant, traditional hymns and contemporary worship songs 
  • To describe the different mass settings used in liturgy and their significance
  • To learn the Eucharistic acclamations; the Gloria, Alleluia, Sanctus and Mystery of Faith
  • To use the Bible and the Nicene Creed to explain Christian beliefs regarding the Trinity
  • To examine Genesis 1 and how it influences Christians interpretations of the Trinity
  • To explain how belief in the Trinity influences Catholic understanding of mission and evangelism
  • To compare and contrast St Augustine and Catherine LaCugna’s explanation of the Trinity
  • To analyse how the councils have impacted Catholic doctrine of the Trinity
  • To explore the importance of Baptism as a sign of initiation and of participation in the Trinity
  • To explain the importance of prayer including contrasting ideas regarding types of prayer

 

 

 

 

Year 10

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Unit 4: Redemption

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit 5: Church and the Kingdom of God

  • To explain how the architecture, design and decoration of Catholic churches reflect beliefs and practices of worship 
  • To analyse how the lectern, altar, crucifix and tabernacle express the mystery of redemption
  • To explore contrasting architecture and artefacts used in Churches
  • To understand how the death of Jesus and the different events surrounding redemption are restorative
  • To compare and contrast Christian views on salvation and grace
  • To evaluate how far redemption has influenced Catholic understanding of the liturgy
  • To compare and contrast St Augustine and Anselm’s salvation metaphors
  • To analyse the meaning of conscience as the Voice of God and how far it guides Catholics today
  • To understand the meaning and importance of the Eucharist for Catholics while comparing it to different denominations
  • To explain how the Words of Institution, the Agnus Dei, the ‘Real Presence’ and the sacrifice of the Mass are linked and shown in Eucharistic adoration

 

  • To reflect on how dramatised prayer, such as the stations of the cross, shows the Church are a people of God on a sacred journey 
  • To understand the meaning and significance of pilgrimage to holy sites such as Jerusalem, Rome, Walsingham, and Lourdes
  • To explain how Catholic understanding of mission and evangelism are expressed in drama
  • To explore the meaning and significance of the ‘Kingdom’ of God as expressed in the Lord’s Prayer
  • To analyse how justice, peace and reconciliation are signs of the Kingdom and are expressed by one important Catholic figure
  • To understand the hierarchy of the Church through the Second Vatican Council and the history of its documents and themes
  • To illustrate how Mary is a model of discipleship in the Church
  • To identify the four marks of the Church and the influence of this on the Magisterium
  • To explain the nature and role of the Magisterium, especially in regard to Catholic social teaching
  • To explore the teaching to love our neighbour through the work of two agencies and through different vocations such as priesthood and family life

 

Term 2

Unit 6: Eschatology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • To reflect on the features and significance of the Paschal candle
  • To analyse Michelangelo’s Last Judgement and its significance for Catholics
  • To compare and contrast different Christian beliefs about life after death and how they are expressed, for example through tombstones and monuments
  • To explore Catholic beliefs about life after death, including Jesus’ resurrection and how this influences eschatology
  • To understand the four last things; death, judgement, heaven and hell
  • To explain Catholic beliefs about purgatory and the difference between particular and final judgement
  • To describe and explain the significance of the story of the Rich Man and Lazarus
  • To know the meaning and significance of cosmic reconciliation of all things with reference to Mother Julian of Norwich
  • To identify how the last rites and the funeral rite express reconciliation and Catholic beliefs about life after death
  • To evaluate the influence of the ‘sanctity of life’ on care for the dying and euthanasia

Term 3

Theme A: Religion Relationships and Families

  • To explore the biblical understanding of humans as male and female
  • To explain the nature and purpose of sexual love as marital, unitive and procreative
  • To explore key features of John Paul II’s Theology of the Body
  • To compare and contrast different perspectives on issues such as sex before marriage, adultery and homosexuality
  • To understand the conditions and nature of a valid marriage
  • To explain Catholic beliefs about annulment, divorce and remarrying
  • To compare and contrast different perspectives on issues such as cohabitation and same-sex marriage
  • To explore the nature and purpose of the family including family planning, procreation and roles and responsibilities at home
  • To explore different attitudes to the use of artificial contraception and the rights of same-sex and single people to have children
  • To analyse biblical and Catholic teaching on the equality of men and women and different perspectives on this today

 

Year 11

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Theme B: Religion Peace and Conflict

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Judaism: Beliefs and Teachings

  • To analyse biblical perspectives on violence, including bullying
  • To explore the concepts of forgiveness, reconciliation and justice through the teachings of Jesus
  • To compare and contrast different perspectives on issues such as righteous anger, injustice and violent protest
  • To know the meaning and significance of Just War Theory, with reference to CCC 2309
  • To explain different attitudes to modern warfare, particular of nuclear war and the use of weapons of mass destruction
  • To understand biblical perspectives on war, including Holy War, particularly from the Old Testament
  • To compare and contrast different perspectives on pacifism
  • To explain Catholic views on terrorism, torture, radicalisation and martyrdom and different perspectives surrounding these issues
  • To explore Catholic perspectives on conflict resolution and peacemaking
  • To analyse the work of two Christian organisations working for conflict resolution and peacemaking

 

  • To understand the nature of God as one, Creator, Law-Giver and Judge
  • To know the key concept of divine presence (Shekinah)
  • To explore Jewish beliefs about life after death, including judgement and resurrection
  • To analyse different beliefs concerning the role of the Messiah
  • To explain the Abrahamic covenant and the importance of the Promised Land
  • To understand the significance of Moses and the 10 Commandments at Sinai
  • To explore key moral principles including justice, healing the world, charity and kindness
  • To evaluate the importance of the Sanctity of Life and ‘saving life’
  • To explain the relationship between free will and the 613 mitzvot
  • To compare and contrast different types of mitzvot and views on their importance

Term 2

Judaism: Practices

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • To reflect on the features and significance of the Paschal candle
  • To analyse Michelangelo’s Last Judgement and its significance for Catholics
  • To compare and contrast different Christian beliefs about life after death and how they are expressed, for example through tombstones and monuments
  • To explore Catholic beliefs about life after death, including Jesus’ resurrection and how this influences eschatology
  • To understand the four last things; death, judgement, heaven and hell
  • To explain Catholic beliefs about purgatory and the difference between particular and final judgement
  • To describe and explain the significance of the story of the Rich Man and Lazarus
  • To know the meaning and significance of cosmic reconciliation of all things with reference to Mother Julian of Norwich
  • To identify how the last rites and the funeral rite express reconciliation and Catholic beliefs about life after death
  • To evaluate the influence of the ‘sanctity of life’ on care for the dying and euthanasia

 

Term 3

N/A

N/A

 

 

 

 

Science (KS3)

Science allows us to explain the world around us, from the ways plants grow, to how the different parts of our body work together to space travel. It is a hugely varied and interesting subject that is well respected by higher education institutions and employers alike due to its academic rigour. Many specific career paths such as medicine, pharmacology, engineering and veterinary science require strong grades in this subject. However, any career choice would benefit from strong grades in science.

In the Science Faculty, we run a two year KS3 course. In Years 7 and 8, students build on their knowledge from Primary School to form clear concepts on fundamental areas of science including particles, forces and the processes of living things

 

Unit

Term Topic Theme Lesson Content
Year: 7 
  1 Autumn 1 Core skills Working scientifically  health and safety 
  equipment 
  scientific investigations 
  Data and graphs 
  2 Cells Cells & Digestion  Microscopes
  Cells
  Specialised cells 
  3 Autumn 2 Forces Forces  Contact and non contact, effect of forces
  Resultant forces
  4 Particles Particles & Separation Particle model 
  Solids, liquids, gases
  5 Spring 1 particles Atoms ,Elements, Compounds  atoms, elements and compounds 
  Particles chemical formulae 
  6 Body systems Structure of living organisiims  Levels of organisation
  breathing and gas exchanges 
  Muscles and joints 
  skeleton 
  7 Spring 2 Space Universe & Gravity  Space & Solar system 
  phases of the moon 
  Day and night, seasons
  8 Reactions Types of reaction  Metal carbonates and acids
  Combustion
  Oxidation 
  Reversible reactions and energy changes
  9 Summer 1 Reproduction Plant & Animal Repro  Animal Reproduction
 
  Plant Reproduction
 
  10 Acid and Alkali Acids and alkali Acids and alkali
  salts and neutralisation 
  11 Summer 2 Waves Sound  Sound waves and energy
  Sound waves drawing and indentifying waves
  Calculating waves
  Uses of sound waves 
  Summer 2  Light Primary and secondary colours of light 
  How we see, eyes, pin-hole cameras
  Reflection, refraction, dispersion 
  EM spectrum and uses of IR etc 
Year: 8 
  12 Autumn 1 Health and lifestyle Nutrition and digestion  Food and nutrients
  Digestive system 
  drugs 
  13 Autumn 2 Periodic Table Periodic Table & elements  Elements
  Periodic Table
  Compounds
  Trends in periodic table
  14 Electricty and magnetisim Magnetism  Effects of magnets
  Electromagnets
 
 
  Voltage, Current & Resistance Basic circuits
  Connecting ammeters and voltmeters, calculating resistance
  Resistance in a wire
  Uses of resistance 
  15 Spring 1 Ecosystems and processes Photosynthesis Structure and function of a leaf 
  Photosynthesis
  Investigating Photosynthesis
  Importance of photosynthesis
  Breathing & Respiration  Respiratory system
  Effects of exercise on breathing and heart rate
  Respiration
  Interdependance  Food chains and food webs 
  16 Seperation techniques Particles & Separation Separation techniques
 
  17 Spring 2 Energy Heating & Cooling  Conduction 
  Convection 
  Radiation
  Heat transfer
  Energy costs Types of energy, efficiency calculations
  Power ratings, power and work done
  Efficiency comparisons
  Generation of electricity
  18 Metals and acids Types of reaction  Metals and acids
  Extracting metals  reactivity and extrcation 
  Materials  polymers ceramics and composites 
  19 Summer 1 Adaptation and inheritance Adaptation and competiion  competition and adaptation 
  Variation and genes  Enivironmental and inhereted characteristics
  Genes and DNA
  Species and biodibersity 
  Genetic engineering and cloning 
  20 Earth's resources Earth Atmosphere
  Lithosphere
  Earth  Extraction of metals 
  Earth Climate change
  21 Summer 2 Motion and Pressure Forces  Speed, distance time 
 
  22 Pressure What is pressure, effects of changing pressure
  Pressure and particles
  Pressure calculations
  Density and related calculations
  23 Skills Science skills Investigation 1
  Investigation 2
  Investigation 3
  Investigation 4
  Investigation 5

Science (Combined)

Science (Combined)

Science allows us to explain the world around us, from the ways plants grow, to how the different parts of our body work together to space travel. It is a hugely varied and interesting subject that is well respected by higher education institutions and employers alike due to its academic rigour. Many specific career paths such as medicine, pharmacology, engineering and veterinary science require strong grades in this subject. However, any career choice would benefit from strong grades in science.

In the Science Faculty, we run a two year KS3 course. In Years 7 and 8, students build on their knowledge from Primary School to form clear concepts on fundamental areas of science including particles, forces and the processes of living things.

In Year 9, students complete a short “key ideas” unit before moving on to the GCSE curriculum, allowing plenty of time to master the challenging new curriculum.

Curriculum intent   GCSE Combined science

Year 9

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

B1: Cell level systems

 

Describe how light microscopes and staining can be used to view cells

Name the main sub-cellular structures of eukaryotic cells and prokaryotic cells and explain how they are related to their functions

Explain how electron microscopy has increased our understanding of sub-cellular structures

Describe DNA as a polymer that is made up of two strands, forming a double helix

Describe that DNA is made from four different nucleotides

Describe experiments that can be used to investigate enzymatic reactions

Explain the mechanism of enzyme action

Describe cellular respiration as a universal chemical process that occurs continuously to supply ATP in all living cells

Describe cellular respiration as an exothermic reaction

Describe and compare the processes of aerobic and anaerobic respiration in animals and plants/fungi inc ATP yield and location

Explain the importance of sugars in the synthesis and breakdown of carbohydrates

Explain the importance of amino acids in the synthesis and breakdown of proteins

Explain the importance of fatty acids and glycerol in the synthesis and breakdown of lipids

Recall that photosynthetic organisms are the main source of food and therefore biomass for life on Earth

Describe the process of photosynthesis, to include reactants and products, the word equation and location of the reaction

Describe photosynthesis as an endothermic reaction

Describe experiments to investigate photosynthesis

Explain the effect of temperature, light intensity and carbon dioxide concentration on the rate of photosynthesis

HT ONLY: Explain the interaction of the effect of temperature, light intensity and carbon dioxide concentration in limiting the rate of photosynthesis

 

C1: Particles

Describe the main features of the particle model in terms of states of matter and change of state

Explain, in terms of the particle model, the distinction between physical changes and chemical changes

HT ONLY: Discuss the limitations of the particle model in relation to changes of state when particles are represented by inelastic spheres

Describe how and why the atomic model has changed over time

Describe the structure of and name the sub atomic particles

State the approximate size of atoms and the relative size of the nucleus and recall where most of the atom's mass is located

State the relative charge of protons, neutrons and electrons and describe the overall charge of an atom

State the relative masses of protons, neutrons and electrons and describe the distribution of mass in an atom

Calculate the number of protons, neutrons and electrons in an atom when given its atomic number and mass number

Define atomic number and mass number

Define an ion and an isotope and use the standard notation to represent these

P1: Matter

 

Describe how and why the atomic model has changed over time

Describe the structure of the atom and discuss the charges and relative sizes of the particles

State the typical size (order of magnitude) of atoms and small molecules

Define density

Explain the differences in density between the different states of matter in terms of the arrangements of the atoms and molecules

Apply the relationship between density, mass and volume to changes where mass is conserved

Describe how mass is conserved when substances melt, freeze, evaporate, condense or sublimate

State that physical changes differ from chemical changes because the material recovers its original properties if the change is reversed

Describe how heating a system will change the energy stored within the system and raise its temperature or produce changes of state

Define the term specific heat capacity and distinguish between it and the term specific latent heat

Apply the relationship between change in internal energy of a material and its mass, specific heat capacity and temperature change to calculate the energy change involved

Apply the relationship between specific latent heat and mass to calculate the energy change involved in a change of state 

Explain how the motion of the molecules in a gas is related both to its temperature and its pressure

Explain the relationship between the temperature of a gas and its pressure at constant volume (qual only)

Recall that gases can be compressed or expanded by pressure changes and that the pressure produces a net force at right angles to any surface

 

B2: Scaling up

Explain how substances are transported into and out of cells through diffusion, osmosis and active transport

Describe the process of mitosis in growth, including the cell cycle

Explain the importance of cell differentiation

Recall that stem cells are present in embryonic and adult animals and meristems in plants

Describe the functions of stem cells

Describe the difference between embryonic and adult stem cells in animals

Explain the need for exchange surfaces and a transport system in multicellular organisms in terms of surface area: volume ratio

Describe some of the substances transported into and out of a range of organisms in terms of the requirements of those organisms

Describe the human circulatory system, the relationship with the gaseous exchange system and the arrangement of vessels

Explain how the structure of the heart and the blood vessels are adapted to their functions

Explain how red blood cells and plasma are adapted to their transport functions in the blood

Explain how water and mineral ions are taken up by plants, including relating the structure of root hair cells to their function

Describe the process of transpiration and translocation

Explain how the structures of the xylem and phloem are adapted to their functions in the plant

Explain the effect of a variety of environmental factors on the rate of water uptake by a plant

Describe how a simple potometer can be used to investigate factors that affect the rate of water uptake

Term 2

C2: Elements, compounds and mixtures

Explain what is meant by the purity of a substance, distinguishing between the scientific and everyday use of the term ‘pure’

Recall how to use melting point data to distinguish pure from impure substances

Describe what the relative formula mass (Mr) of a compound is and calculate the relative formula mass of a compound, given its formula

Deduce the empirical formula of a compound

Explain that many useful materials are formulations of mixtures

Describe, explain and exemplify the processes of filtration, crystallisation, simple distillation, and fractional distillation

Describe the techniques of paper and thin layer chromatography

Recall that chromatography involves a stationary and a mobile phase

Recall how to interpret chromatograms, including measuring Rf values

Suggest suitable separation and purification techniques for different mixtures

Suggest chromatographic methods for distinguishing pure from impure substances

Describe metals and non-metals and explain the differences between them on the basis of their characteristic physical and chemical properties

Explain how the atomic structure of metals and non-metals relates to their position in the periodic table

Explain how the position of an element in the periodic table is related to the arrangement of electrons in its atoms

Describe how elements are placed in groups and periods and how the electrons link to group number

Describe and compare the nature and arrangement of chemical bonds in: ionic compounds, simple molecules, giant covalent structures, polymers and metals

Explain chemical bonding in terms of electrostatic forces and the transfer or sharing of electrons

Represent ionic compounds and simple covalent molecules using dot and cross diagrams

Discuss the limitations of particular representations and models, including dot and cross diagrams, ball and stick models and two- and three-dimensional representations

Explain how the reactions of elements are related to the arrangement of electrons in their atoms and hence to their atomic number

Explain in terms of atomic number how Mendeleev’s arrangement was refined into the modern periodic table

Recall that carbon can form four covalent bonds

Explain that the vast array of natural and synthetic organic compounds occur due to the ability of carbon to form families of similar compounds, chains and rings

Explain the properties of graphite, diamond, fullerenes and graphene in terms of their structure and bonding

Explain the different temperatures at which changes of state occur, using ideas about energy transfers and the relative strength of chemical bonds and intermolecular forces

Use data to predict states of substances under given conditions

Explain how the bulk properties of materials are related to the different types of bonds they contain, their bond strengths and the ways in which their bonds are arranged

 

P4: Waves and radioactivity

Describe wave motion in terms of amplitude, wavelength, frequency and period

Define wavelength and frequency

Describe and apply the relationship between these and the wave velocity

Apply formulae relating velocity, frequency and wavelength

Describe differences between transverse and longitudinal waves

Explain how changes, in velocity, frequency and wavelength, in transmission of sound waves from one medium to another, are inter-related

Describe how ripples on water surfaces are used to model transverse waves whilst sound waves in air are longitudinal waves, and how the speed of each may be measured

Describe evidence that in both cases it is the wave and not the water or air itself that travels

Recall that electromagnetic waves are transverse and are transmitted through space where all have the same velocity

Explain that electromagnetic waves transfer energy from source to absorber

Apply the relationships between frequency and wavelength across the electromagnetic spectrum

Describe the main groupings of the electromagnetic spectrum and that these groupings range from long to short wavelengths and from low to high frequencies

Describe that our eyes can only detect a limited range of the electromagnetic spectrum

Recall that light is an electromagnetic wave

State examples of some practical uses of electromagnetic waves in the radio, micro-wave, infra-red, visible, ultra-violet, X-ray and gamma-ray regions

Describe how ultra-violet waves, X-rays and gamma-rays can have hazardous effects, notably on human bodily tissues

HT ONLY: Recall that radio waves can be produced by, or can themselves induce, oscillations in electrical circuits

HT ONLY: Recall that different substances may absorb, transmit, refract, or reflect electromagnetic waves in ways that vary with wavelength

HT ONLY: Explain how some effects are related to differences in the velocity of electromagnetic waves in different substances

Recall that atomic nuclei are composed of both protons and neutrons, that the nucleus of each element has a characteristic positive charge

Recall that atoms of the same elements can differ in nuclear mass by having different numbers of neutrons

Use the conventional representation for nuclei to relate the differences between isotopes

Recall that some nuclei are unstable and may emit alpha particles, beta particles, or neutrons, and electromagnetic radiation as gamma rays

Relate these emissions to possible changes in the mass or the charge of the nucleus, or both

Recall how to use names and symbols of common nuclei and particles to write balanced equations that represent radioactive decay

Recall how to balance equations representing the emission of alpha-, beta- or gamma-radiation in terms of the masses, and charges of the atoms involved

Recall that in each atom its electrons are arranged at different distances from the nucleus and that such arrangements may change with absorption or emission of electromagnetic radiation

Recall that atoms can become ions by loss of outer electrons

Recall that changes in atoms and nuclei can also generate and absorb radiations over a wide frequency range

Explain the concept of half-life and how this is related to the random nature of radioactive decay

HT ONLY: Recall how to calculate the net decline, expressed as a ratio, during radioactive emission after a given (integral) number of half-lives

Recall the differences in the penetration properties of alpha-particles, beta-particles and gamma-rays

Recall the differences between contamination and irradiation effects and compare the hazards associated with these two

 

Term 3

C4: Predicting and identifying reactions and products

Recall the physical and chemical properties of Groups 1, 7 and 0

Explain how observed simple properties of Groups 1, 7 and 0 depend on the outer shell of electrons of the atoms and predict properties from given trends down the groups

Recall the general properties of transition metals and their compounds and exemplify these by reference to a small number of transition metals

Recall how to predict possible reactions and probable reactivity of elements from their positions in the periodic table

Explain how the reactivity of metals with water or dilute acids is related to the tendency of the metal to form its positive ion

Deduce the order of reactivity of metals based on experimental data

Describe how to test for the presence of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide and chlorine

 

 

 

P6: Global challenges

 

Recall typical speeds encountered in everyday experience for wind and sound, and for walking, running, cycling and other transportation systems

Estimate the magnitudes of everyday accelerations

Recall how to make calculations using ratios and proportional reasoning to convert units and to compute rates

Explain methods of measuring human reaction times and recall typical results

Explain the factors which affect the distance required for road transport vehicles to come to rest in emergencies and the implications for safety

Explain the dangers caused by large decelerations

Describe the main energy sources available for use on Earth, compare the ways in which they are used and distinguish between renewable and non-renewable sources

Explain patterns and trends in the use of energy resources

Recall that, in the national grid, electrical power is transferred at high voltages from power stations, and then transferred at lower voltages in each locality for domestic use

Describe how step-up and step-down transformers are used to change the potential difference as power is transferred from power stations

Explain how the national grid is an efficient way to transfer energy

Recall that the domestic supply in the UK is a.c. At 50Hz and about 230 volts

Explain the difference between direct and alternating voltage

Recall the differences in function between the live, neutral and earth mains wires, and the potential differences between these wires

Explain that a live wire may be dangerous even when a switch in the mains circuit is open, by explaining the danger of providing any connection between the live wire and earth

 

Year 10

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

B6: Global challenges

Explain how to carry out a field investigation into the distribution and abundance of organisms in a habitat and how to determine their numbers in a given area

Describe positive and negative human interactions within ecosystems

Explain the impact of human interactions within ecosystems on biodiversity

Explain some of the benefits and challenges of maintaining local and global biodiversity

Explain the impact of the selective breeding of food plants and domesticated animals

Describe genetic engineering as a process which involves modifying the genome of an organism to introduce desirable characteristics

HT ONLY: Describe the main steps in the process of genetic engineering

Describe and explain some possible biotechnological and agricultural solutions to the demands of the growing human population

Describe the relationship between health and disease

Describe different types of diseases, to include communicable and non-communicable diseases

Describe the interactions between different types of disease

Explain how communicable diseases are spread in animals and plants

Explain how the spread of communicable diseases may be reduced or prevented in animals and plants

Describe a minimum of one common human infection, one plant disease and sexually transmitted infections in humans

Explain how white blood cells and platelets are adapted to their defence functions in the blood

Describe the non-specific defence systems of the human body against pathogens

Explain the role of the immune system of the human body in defence against disease

Explain the use of vaccines and medicines in the prevention and treatment of disease

Describe the processes of discovery and development of potential new medicines

Recall that many non-communicable human diseases are caused by the interaction of a number of factors

Evaluate some different treatments for cardiovascular disease

Analyse the effect of lifestyle factors on the incidence of non-communicable diseases at local, national and global levels

Describe cancer as the result of changes in cells that lead to uncontrolled growth and division

Discuss potential benefits and risks associated with the use of stem cells in medicine

Explain some of the possible benefits and risks of using gene technology in medicine

 

C6: Global challenges

Explain, using the position of carbon in the reactivity series, the principles of industrial processes used to extract metals

Explain why and how electrolysis is used to extract some metals from their ores

HT ONLY: Evaluate alternative biological methods of metal extraction

Describe the basic principles in carrying out a life-cycle assessment of a material or product

Recall how to interpret data from a life-cycle assessment of a material or product

Describe a process where a material or product is recycled for a different use, and explain why this is viable

Evaluate factors that affect decisions on recycling

Describe and explain the separation of crude oil by fractional distillation

Describe the fractions as largely a mixture of compounds of formula CnH2n+2 which are members of the alkane homologous series

Recall that crude oil is a main source of hydrocarbons and is a feedstock for the petrochemical industry

Explain how modern life is crucially dependent upon hydrocarbons and recognise that crude oil is a finite resource

Describe the production of materials that are more useful by cracking

Interpret evidence for how it is thought the atmosphere was originally formed

Explain how, at the beginning of Earth's existence, oxygen was produced by photosynthesis and use the word and chemical equation for photosynthesis

Describe the greenhouse effect in terms of the interaction of radiation with matter within the atmosphere

Evaluate arguments for and against the idea that human activities cause a rise in temperature that results in global climate change

State some potential side effects of global climate change, including discussing scale, risk and environmental implications

List the major sources of carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen and particulates in the atmosphere and explain the problems caused by increased amounts of these substances

Describe the principal methods for increasing the availability of potable water in terms of the separation techniques used

 

B4: Community level systems

 

Recall that many different substances cycle through the abiotic and biotic components of an ecosystem, with examples

Explain the role of microorganisms in the cycling of substances through an ecosystem

Explain the importance of the carbon cycle and the water cycle to living organisms

Describe different levels of organisation in an ecosystem from individual organisms to the whole ecosystem

Explain how abiotic and biotic factors can affect communities

Describe the importance of interdependence and competition in a community

Term 2

P2: Forces

Describe how to measure distance and time in a range of scenarios

Describe how to measure distance and time and use these to calculate speed

Recall how to make calculations using ratios and proportional reasoning to convert units and to compute rates

Explain the vector–scalar distinction as it applies to displacement and distance, velocity and speed

Relate changes and differences in motion to appropriate distance-time, and velocity-time graphs; interpret lines and slopes

HT ONLY: Recall how to interpret enclosed areas in velocity-time graphs

Recall how to calculate average speed for non-uniform motion

Recall how to apply formulae relating distance, time and speed, for uniform motion, and for motion with uniform acceleration

Recall examples of ways in which objects interact and describe how such examples involve interactions between pairs of objects which produce a force on each object

Recall how to represent such forces as vectors

Recall and apply Newton’s First Law to explain the motion of an object moving with uniform velocity and also an object where the speed and/or direction change

HT ONLY: Recall how to use vector diagrams to illustrate resolution of forces, a net force (resultant force), and equilibrium situations

HT ONLY: Describe examples of the forces acting on an isolated solid object or system

HT ONLY: Describe, using free body diagrams, examples where two or more forces lead to a resultant force on an object

HT ONLY: Describe, using free body diagrams, examples of the special case where forces balance to produce a resultant force of zero (qualitative only)

Recall and apply Newton’s second law in calculations relating forces, masses and accelerations

HT ONLY: Explain that inertia is a measure of how difficult it is to change the velocity of an object and that the mass is defined as the ratio of force over acceleration

HT ONLY: Define momentum and describe examples of momentum in collisions

Recall how to use the relationship between work done, force, and distance moved along the line of action of the force and describe the energy transfer involved

Calculate relevant values of stored energy and energy transfers; convert between newton-metres and joules

Explain, with reference to examples, the definition of power as the rate at which energy is transferred

Recall and apply Newton’s third law

HT ONLY: Explain why an object moving in a circle with a constant speed has a changing velocity (qualitative only)

Explain that to stretch, bend or compress an object, more than one force has to be applied

Describe the difference between elastic and plastic deformation caused by stretching forces

Describe the relationship between force and extension for a spring and other simple systems

Describe the difference between linear and non-linear relationships between force and extension

Recall how to calculate a spring constant in linear cases

Recall how to calculate the work done in stretching

Describe that all matter has a gravitational field that causes attraction, and the field strength is much greater for massive objects

Define weight and describe how it is measured

Describe the relationship between the weight of an object and the gravitational field strength (g) (and) has a value of 10N/kg at the Earth’s surface

Recall the acceleration in free fall

 

B3: Organism level systems

Describe the structure of the nervous system, to include the central nervous system, sensory and motor neurones and sensory receptors

Explain how the components of the nervous system can produce a coordinated response

Explain how the structure of a reflex arc is related to its function

Describe the principles of hormonal coordination and control by the human endocrine system

HT ONLY: Explain the roles of thyroxine and adrenalin in the body, including thyroxine as an example of a negative feedback system

Name and describe the roles of hormones involved in human reproduction, including control of the menstrual cycle

HT ONLY: Explain the interactions of FSH, LH, oestrogen and progesterone in the control of the menstrual cycle

Explain the use of hormones in contraception

Evaluate hormonal and non-hormonal methods of contraception

HT ONLY: Explain the use of hormones in modern reproductive technologies to treat infertility

Explain the importance of maintaining a constant internal environment in response to internal and external change

Explain how insulin controls blood sugar levels in the body

HT ONLY: Explain how glucagon interacts with insulin to control blood sugar levels in the body

Compare type 1 and type 2 diabetes and explain how they can be treated

Describe the gross structure of the kidney and the structure of the kidney tubule

Term 3

P3: Electricity and magnetism

Describe that charge is a property of all matter, that there are positive and negative charges, and that the effects of charges are not seen inc how they cancel each other out

Describe the production of static electricity, and sparking, by the rubbing of insulating surfaces

Describe evidence that charged objects exert forces of attraction or repulsion on one another when not in contact

Explain how transfer of electrons between objects can explain the phenomena of static electricity

Recall that current is a rate of flow of charge (electrons) and the conditions needed for charge to flow

Recall that current has the same value at any point in a single closed loop

Recall and use the relationship between quantity of charge, current and time

Describe the differences between series and parallel circuits

Recall how to represent d.c. circuits with the conventions of positive and negative terminals, and the symbols that represent common circuit elements

Recall that current depends on both resistance and potential difference and the units in which these are measured

Recall and apply the relationship between I, R and V, and that for some resistors the value of R remains constant but that in others it can change as the current changes

Explain that for some resistors the value of R remains constant but that in others it can change as the current changes

Explain the design and use of circuits to explore such effects

Recall how to use graphs to explore whether circuit elements are linear or non-linear

Recall how to use graphs and relate the curves produced to the function and properties of circuit elements

Explain why, if two resistors are in series the net resistance is increased, whereas with two in parallel the net resistance is decreased

Recall how to calculate the currents, potential differences and resistances in d.c. series and parallel circuits

Explain the design and use of such circuits for measurement and testing purposes

Explain how the power transfer in any circuit device is related to the potential difference across it and the current, and to the energy changes over a given time

Apply the equations relating potential difference, current, quantity of charge, resistance, power, energy, and time, and solve problems for circuits

Describe the attraction and repulsion between unlike and like poles for permanent magnets

Describe the difference between permanent and induced magnets

Describe the characteristics of the magnetic field of a magnet, showing how strength and direction change from one point to another

Explain how the behaviour of a magnetic compass is related to evidence that the core of the Earth must be magnetic

Describe how to show that a current can create a magnetic effect and describe the directions of the magnetic field around a conducting wire

Recall that the strength of the field depends on the current and the distance from the conductor

Explain how solenoid arrangements can enhance the magnetic effect

HT ONLY: Describe how a magnet and a current-carrying conductor exert a force on one another

HT ONLY: Recall how to show that Fleming’s left-hand rule represents the relative orientations of the force, the current and the magnetic field

HT ONLY: Apply the equation that links the force on a conductor to the magnetic flux density, the current and the length of conductor to calculate the forces involved

HT ONLY: Explain how the force exerted from a magnet and a current-carrying conductor is used to cause rotation in electric motors

 

 

C3: Chemical reactions

Recall how to use chemical symbols to write the formulae of elements and simple covalent and ionic compounds

Write word equations and balanced symbol equations for chemical reactions, including using appropriate state symbols

Use the names and symbols of common elements and compounds and the principle of conservation of mass to write formulae and balanced chemical equations

Use the names and symbols of common elements from a supplied periodic table to write formulae and balanced chemical equations where appropriate

Use the formula of common ions to deduce the formula of a compound

HT ONLY: Write balanced half equations and ionic equations

HT ONLY: Recall and use the definitions of the Avogadro constant and of the mole, and carry out calculations in standard form using the Avogadro constant

HT ONLY: Explain how the mass of a given substance is related to the amount of that substance in moles and vice versa

Recall and use the law of conservation of mass

Explain any observed changes in mass in non-enclosed systems during a chemical reaction, using the particle model

HT ONLY: Deduce the stoichiometry of an equation from the masses of reactants and products

HT ONLY: Explain the effect of limiting the quantity of a reactant

HT ONLY: Calculate the masses of reactants and products when given a balanced symbol equation

Distinguish between endothermic and exothermic reactions on the basis of the temperature change of the surroundings

Draw and label a reaction profile for an exothermic and an endothermic reaction

Explain activation energy as the energy needed for a reaction to occur

HT ONLY: Calculate energy changes in a chemical reaction by considering bond making and bond breaking energies

Explain reduction and oxidation in terms of loss or gain of oxygen, identifying which species are oxidised and which are reduced

HT ONLY: Explain reduction and oxidation in terms of gain or loss of electrons

Recall that acids form hydrogen ions when they dissolve in water and solutions of alkalis contain hydroxide ions

Describe neutralisation as acid reacting with alkali or a base to form a salt plus water

Recall that aqueous neutralisation reactions can be generalised to hydrogen ions reacting with hydroxide ions to form water

Recall that carbonates and some metals react with acids and write balanced equations predicting products from given reactants

HT ONLY: Use and explain the terms dilute and concentrated and weak and strong, in relation to acids

Recall that relative acidity and alkalinity are measured by pH

HT ONLY: Describe neutrality and relative acidity and alkalinity in terms of the effect of the concentration of hydrogen ions on the numerical value of pH

HT ONLY: Recall that as hydrogen ion concentration increases by a factor of ten the pH value of a solution decreases by a factor of one

Describe techniques and apparatus used to measure pH

Recall at which inert electrode (cathode or anode) that metals, hydrogen and non-metals are formed at

Predict the products of electrolysis of binary ionic compounds (e.g. NaCl) in the molten state

Describe competing reactions in the electrolysis of aqueous solutions of ionic compounds e.g. NaCl and CuSO4

Describe electrolysis in terms of the ions present and reactions at the electrodes

Describe the technique of electrolysis using inert and non-inert electrodes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year 11

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

B5: Genes, inheritance and selection

Explain the following terms: gamete, chromosome, gene, genome, allele/variant, dominant, recessive, homozygous, heterozygous, genotype and phenotype

Describe the genome as the entire genetic material of an organism

Describe that the genome, and its interaction with the environment, influence the development of the phenotype of an organism

Recall that all variants arise from mutations, and that most have no effect on the phenotype, some influence phenotype and a very few determine phenotype

Explain the terms haploid and diploid

Explain the role of meiotic cell division in halving the chromosome number to form gametes

Explain single gene inheritance

Predict the results of single gene crosses

Describe sex determination in humans using a genetic cross

Recall that most phenotypic features are the result of multiple genes rather than single gene inheritance

State that there is usually extensive genetic variation within a population of a species

Describe the impact of developments in biology on classification systems

Explain how evolution occurs through the natural selection of variants that have given rise to different phenotypes

Describe evolution as a change in the inherited characteristics of a population over me, through a process of natural selection

Describe the evidence for evolution, to include fossils and antibiotic resistance in bacteria

Term 2

C5: Monitoring and controlling chemical reactions

 

HT ONLY: Explain how the mass of a solute and the volume of the solution is related to the concentration of the solution

Suggest practical methods for determining the rate of reaction

Recall how to interpret rate of reaction graphs

Describe the effect of changes in temperature, concentration, pressure, and surface area on rate of reaction

Explain the effects on rates of reaction of changes in temperature, concentration and pressure in terms of frequency and energy of collision between particles

Explain the effects on rates of reaction of changes in the size of the pieces of a reacting solid in terms of surface area to volume ratio

Describe the characteristics of catalysts and their effect on rates of reaction

Recall how to identify catalysts in reactions

Explain catalytic action in terms of activation energy

Recall that enzymes act as catalysts in biological systems

Recall that some reactions may be reversed by altering the reaction conditions

Recall that dynamic equilibrium occurs in a closed system when the rates of forward and reverse reactions are equal

HT ONLY:  Recall how to predict the effect of changing reaction conditions on equilibrium position and suggest appropriate conditions to produce as much of a particular product as possible

 

Exam revision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sociology

Sociology is the study of human social relationships and social institutions. Its purpose is to understand how human action and consciousness both shape and are shaped by surrounding cultural and social structures. Sociology is an exciting and illuminating subject that covers a range of topics such as crime, education, religion and families.

Year 9

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Introduction to sociology

Introduction to Sociology 

  • Explain the Nature versus Nurture 
  • To define and describe Norms, values and socialisation 
  • To explain Sex versus gender 
  • To evaluate important debates on class, age, gender and ethnicity 
  • To explain sociological perspectives; functionalism, Marxism, feminism, interactionism and postmodernism 

 

Term 2

Research Methods

Research Methods – how do sociologists investigate society and social behaviour? 

To define, explain and evaluate:

  • Ethical issues 
  • Practical issues 
  • Questionnaires 
  • Interviews 
  • Observations 
  • Longitudinal studies 
  • Sampling 
  • Official statistics 
  • Case studies and ethnographies 
  • Primary versus Secondary data 

 

Term 3

Families and Households

  • Defining the family 
  • To explain reasons for increased family diversity in the UK 
  • To evaluate ‘is the nuclear family still important?’ 
  • To describe alternative families (communes, kibbutz) and global differences in family life 
  • To explain and evaluate Functionalist, Marxist and feminist perspectives on families 
  • To explain marriage, divorce and the consequences 
  • To explain and evaluate roles and relationships in the family 

 

 

Year 10

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Education

  • To explain and avaluate functions of the family from functionalist, Marxist and feminist perspective
  • To describe and evaluate school diversity
  • To evaluate alternative education
  • To compare private versus state school
  • To explain and evaluate explanations for differences in educational achievement according to class, gender, and ethnicity

Term 2

Education

  • To evaluate different measurements of recording achievement e.g. progress 8
  • To evaluate different education policies since 1870

Crime and Deviance

  • To define crime and deviance
  • To evaluate different definitions
  • To explain and evaluate how crime is measured
  • To compare biological, psychological and sociological explanations of crime.
  • To explain and evaluate the functionalist, feminist and Marxist view of crime.
  • To describe patterns of offending

Term 3

Crime and Deviance

  • To evaluate patterns of offending according to class, age, gender and ethnicity.
  • To describe agents of formal and informal social control
  • To assess arguments for treatment of young offenders
  • To assess the arguments for and against prisons
  • To evaluate the role of the media in crime creation and presentation.

 

Year 11

 

Unit / Topic / Theme

Student Learning Outcomes

Term 1

Social Stratification

  • To define social stratification
  • To compare approaches to stratification from functionalist and Marxist perspective
  • To assess factors that affect life chances
  • To evaluate studies of the affluent worker
  • To explain social mobility and evaluate problems with measuring social mobility
  • To define poverty and evaluate different explanations of poverty.

Term 2

Social stratification

  • To define the underclass and evaluate different approaches to poverty
  • To describe the history of the welfare state
  • To evaluate different approaches to the welfare state
  • To define and explain globalisation and its impact on social stratification in the UK
  • To describe power and authority and different types.
  • To evaluate the role of patriarchy in the UK

Revision

Term 3

Revision

  • Focus on areas of weakness to ensure students have a complete understanding of what they need for the exams
  • Develop exam skills
  • Practise answering exam-style questions

Spanish

The MFL Faculty strives to prepare students for a globalised world where the importance and relevance of foreign language learning has never been greater, given the wider opportunities for contacts abroad both at work and in leisure time.

Learning a language maximises opportunities for future employment in the UK, and offers a stimulating intellectual experience and a challenge which is worthwhile in itself. It also supports English literacy acquisition.

We believe that gaining insight into other cultures leads to greater tolerance and contributes to breaking barriers of racism and xenophobia.

During Years 7-8, students will have the opportunity to develop their language skills in listening, reading, speaking and writing in the target language. Whenever possible and appropriate, we use authentic material to support teaching and learning.

Weekly homework is a crucial part of learning and ensures students consolidate grammar concepts and vocabulary.

Unit Term Topic Theme Lesson Content
Year: 7 
  1 Autumn 1 Phonics Relationship between letter and sound Spanish sounds and intonation
  Class rules Infinitive expressions: Hay que, vamos a Colours, numbers 1- 6
  Writing a short paragraph Basic connectives, expressions with infinitives Writing a short text describing what you can and can't do at school
  Assessment week and DIT
  2 Greetings Greetings expressions; cómo, dónde Asking and saying my name, where I live and how I am
  Age Numbers 1- 20, expressions with tener Asking and saying my age
  Autumn 2 Dates and birthdays Numbers 1- 31 Asking and saying when my birthday is; asking and saying today's date
  The alphabet & spelling words in Spanish Alphabet & spellings Asking and saying spelling of familiar words
  Items in my rucksack Masculine & feminine; basic connectives; writing a Asking and saying what you have in your rucksack
  Items in the classroom Masculine & feminine; basic connectives;writing a  Asking and saying what you have in your classroom
  Consolidation- Reading strategies tengo, me llamo, hay Introducing myself
  Assessment week
  DIT and target setting
  3 Spring 1 School subjects Masculine & feminine; basic connectives;writing a  Asking and saying the school subjects you study
  Lesson activities Present tense of regular verbs (ar) Asking and saying what you do at school
  Describing your teachers Es, tiene, negation, adjectival agreement Asking and saying what your teacher is like
  Expressing opinions on school subjects Opinion verbs, masculine & feminine, singular & pl Asking and expressing opinion
  Items of food and drink Present tense of regular verbs (er, ir) Asking and saying what you normally eat and drink at school
  Consolidation- Listening strategies Opinion verbs and present tense Describing school day and the subjects you like
  Assessment week and DIT
  4 Spring 2 Telling the time Numbers, singular & plural Asking and telling th time
  The future tense Immediate future tense & infinitives Future tense & conjugation of ir
  Open book writing assessent Using the present and the future tenses together General revision
  DIT with codes
  5 Expressing opinions on free time activities Opinions verbs & infinitives Asking and expressing opinions
  Summer 1 Free time activites Present tense of hacer, salir; al, a la Free time verbs and opinions
  Sports Present tense of hacer & jugar Sports and opinions
  Consolidation- Writing strategies Present tense of irregular verbs, future tense, op Free time
  Assessment week and DIT Present tense, Opinions verbs & infinitives
  6 Description- hair & eyes Present tense tener Physical description
  Talking about my family- brothers and sisters adjectival agreement, se llama(n), possessives, ti Describing others
  Summer 2 Talking about my family- other family members se llama(n), possessives, tiene Describing others, numbers 1- 100
  Talking about pets adjectival agreement, se llama(n), possessives, ti Describing others
  Describing character adjectival agreement, se llama(n), tengo, soy Describing oneself
  Consolidation- Reading strategies Descriptions, present tense, future tense, adjecti Descriptions
  Assessment week and DIT
  DIT week
Year: 8 
  7 Autumn 1  Verbs: Infinitives and present tense Verbs and verb endings Free time
  Autumn 1 Free time activities Present tense of regular verbs and hacer, salir, j
  Description Adjectival agreement, tener, ser Describing others
  Comparisons Desccribing others
  Assessment week 1 Present tense and comparatives Descriptions and free time
  DIT with grammar codes
  8 Autumn 2 Daily routine Reflexive verbs- present tense Describing my routine
  Nationality Adjectival agreemnent  Talking about oneself
  Conslodiation week Using the future and present tenses together  
  Assessment week 2 Descriptions and free time
  9 Places in town voy al vs voy a la Describing where I go 
  Future tense Present and future tenses together Making plans
  Telling the time Singlular and plural Arranging to go out
  Spring 1 Inviting someone out Using the conditional 
  Accepting and Refusing invitations No puedo, quiero + infinitive
  What you like doing in your free time Expressions with infinitives Free time
  Conslodiation week Free time and descriptions
  Assessment week 3
  Assessment DIT
  10 Spring 2 What you did Preterite of regular verbs Holidays
  Where you want and who with Preterite of ir and ser
  Saying where you went on holidays Preterite of irregular verbs
  Saying who you went on holidays with
  Giving more details of your holidays Expressing opinions in the preterite
  Conslodiation week Using the future, present and preterite tenses to 
  Summer 1 Assessment 4
  DIT with grammar codes
  11 Talking about the weather Weather idioms
  Open book assessment Using the future, present and preterite tenses to 
  DIT with grammar codes
  12 Summer 2 Iitems of clothing Adjectival agreement, tener, ser Identity
  School uniform Present tense of llevar/ sentences with infinitive
  What you like wearing Planning a trip
  Talking about a party you went Revision of preterite
  Conslodiation week Using the future, present and preterite tenses to 
  Assessment 6
  DIT with grammar codes